Author Topic: BAA is caught in a numbers game  (Read 2795 times)

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Offline Andrew A.

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Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline Andrew A.

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Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: BAA is caught in a numbers game
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2010, 04:33:16 PM »
Statements coming out of the BAA make them seem like they take their marathon more seriously than their actions indicate they actually do, and betray a conceited attitude.  Things like
Quote
I dont want to eliminate the sense of runner euphoria when they cross the finish line of a qualifying race and they look at the clock and see a time, said McGillivray. I dont want them to cross the finish line and say, I hope Im in now. Youd like to structure this where you run a certain time and you can start celebrating right away.
are just short of ridiculous.  If someone is going to feel 'euphoria' enough to 'celebrate' qualifying for the race then why would they not also 'celebrate' the 'euphoria' of running faster than they ever have, or at the very least what for that person would be a crowning performance?  I mean, people also 'celebrate' the feeling of 'euphoria' of merely finishing a marathon so why not champion that ideal, too?

It has also been clear that "the registration system is unfair" for longer than just the past year or two.  Needing to register months and months in advance of race day does not serve the best runners well at all -- however, a multitude of slower runners with deeper pockets seem okay with it.  Would Bill Rodgers, if not a returning champion or invited elite, have been able to justify dropping an amount of money that might equal (if not exceed) his grocery bill for the next month or three in October for a race in April back when he was just getting his start in marathons?  Somehow the prospect of letting runners with a faster standard register before runners who have met a slower standard (not to mention the headache it would cause for BAA staff when slower runners register while fraudulently claiming to have met the faster standard) if that registration window opens before the February preceding race day is hardly any improvement.
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline Double

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Re: BAA is caught in a numbers game
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2010, 07:56:18 PM »
In grade school we lined up and raced each other...a lot.  As we aged, others asked to see people go head to head.  At 13 we had our own Olympics,
including the marathon (4 mile block).  We sprinted against each other at the end of football practice.  The top ten always squared off.  I ran in HS
and in College.  For the most part, I've been running all my life.  I enjoy training, racing, and the regiment.
 
I ran Boston my first Boston at 40 years old.  It was a great experience for me and my PR is there.  But, if you were to pull that experience from my
personal lifetime of enjoyment, it would be like taking a drop of water out of a bucket of water.  You wouldn't notice it. 
 
I've said this before, running is not holistic to me.  When I mow the grass, I'm thinking about mowing the grass.  When I run, I concentrate on running.
I have never experienced this euphoria...hell, I haven't even figured out whar a runner's high is.  These events are just something to do.  When I was
one of the last ones to get in the theatre when "Gran Torino" came out, I didn't feel euphoric; nor was I high.  I just made it in.
 
Boston is like the NCAA.  Let's suspend players from Ohio State next year.  However, you can play in the BIG bowl game.  You figure it out.
 
I have little time for wafflers.  I'll do my 2-3 events a year and let the buttercups do what they think makes them feel life. 
 
 
 
"What are you training for?" "For life."  (Barry Duncan)
"What race are you running?" "The human race." (Clement Grum)