Author Topic: Always Ready To Race  (Read 6292 times)

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Offline Andrew A.

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Always Ready To Race
« on: May 06, 2011, 07:40:46 AM »
Great training article from Joe Rubio: http://www.runningtimes.com/Article.aspx?ArticleID=22722
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline cesar

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Re: Always Ready To Race
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2011, 10:12:32 AM »

Thanks. Really good article, He also wrote about that in the book "run strong". That is basically what I am doing right know, but I added 6 weeks of easy running(Daniels base phase).My question is don't you get injured of doing high intensity all year round? How one can improve without stepping back in  intensity and building more easy miles?

Offline Double

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Re: Always Ready To Race
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2011, 11:42:22 AM »
This has always been around.  In the 70's and 80's it seemed many guys raced all the time...and well.  Some tolerated it
very well.  Bill Rodgers and Robert de Castella come immediatly to mind...though many perscribed to year around racing.
 
Most of us running for a period of time were introduced to the sport this way.  Once I began reading a lot of Ron Daws
I picked up on training in stages.  I actually preferred this and went about things this way for years.
 
I will say, as one ages the throw it all in over the week seems more doable and practical.  Mainly because the mileage
base shrinks and the recovery from a diet of miles seems to take longer.  In my medical history this is certainly the case,
but I know few my age or older who run 70+ a week.
 
If I was younger and cared about optimum performance, I would go about it with the Lydiard type method, though this
is just personal experience.
 
Again...back to today, a Summer regiment of 1 Long (2-3 hours), 1 Medium (1.5-2 hours), 1-2 Harder (20-30 minutes)
and the other easy days or off is really appealing.  It is nice to get a harder workout in and be done in 50 minutes.
That's about 55 miles a week, which for around here seems to be a decent week of running anymore.
 
 
"What are you training for?" "For life."  (Barry Duncan)
"What race are you running?" "The human race." (Clement Grum)

Offline ksrunner

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Re: Always Ready To Race
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2011, 12:13:24 PM »
I was going to post a link to the article if it were not already posted.

Cesar, I think that one might be able to manage such a schedule by listening to your body and remaining controlled in your workouts and races. He addresses it in the article in the section titled, Endless Season Intensity:

Quote
This isn't a phase where you hammer any and all workouts and races; this phase is about keeping things controlled, both in workouts and races. It's about consistency and self-control. It's a long-term approach, an approach of letting the fitness come to you instead of trying to force the issue.

I really like the phrase "letting the fitness come to you". Hindsight being 20:20, I see that most (maybe all) of my injuries have occurred at times when I was anxious to be race fit right now -- where race fit represented a specific performance goal. I would suddenly start training at the volume or intensity that I thought would be necessary to be able to meet that goal -- right now. That doesn't work. You cannot get from point A to point B without passing through all of the intervening points first. You may never get there, but if you start training at the level that you body can handle now and gradually progress, there is a good chance for success. Magill states it well in his article, Slower Is Faster.

I really like the idea of the endless season. My work schedule remains consistent year round. When I've wanted to try to train in Lydiard-style phases, I always struggled with the transition from one phase to the next and failed at some point in the progression. It is easier for me to establish a weekly routine and try to stick to that year round with only minor adjustments from time to time. I printed out this article for reference after doing little more than reading the title and skimming through the first page. This is exactly what I am trying to accomplish with my training.

I feel like these lessons that I'm learning in my 40's are things that others here learned much earlier. I've not been a very good student of the sport. Early on, I relied upon coaches to tell me what to do without understanding why. Later, I did do some reading, but I allowed exuberance to override common sense much too often. Hopefully, I am figuring it out while I've still got a some fast performances ahead of me.
We run, not because we think it is doing us good, but because we enjoy it and cannot help ourselves.
   - Sir Roger Bannister, former athlete

Offline Ryan

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Re: Always Ready To Race
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2011, 12:33:42 PM »
I was also going to link to this article. I actually heard a Running Times Performance Podcast from March 30th, where Scott Douglas interviewed Rubio on this topic. I still have it on my phone because I thought it was such a good interview I might want to listen again.

Double, I would agree (no surprise to many I'm sure). If you want to put it all on the line and have your best performance possible at a single race, then this type of training isn't for you. This is for the person who wants to run well from the spring right through the fall. You'll give up a little on the peak but you'll be ready for a good performance at any race that comes along for a long period of time. Honestly, this is what a lot of us hackers are looking for. Just let me run well at as many races as possible through my area's racing season.

Cesar, the key is the intensity level. If one was doing high intensity workouts for a sustained amount of time, they would get injured or burn out likely after about 2 months. The key to endless season training, as already pointed out and as I seem to recall Rubio stressing in the podcast, is that you aren't running these workouts all out. One of the runners I'm working with right now is actually looking to do a lot of racing throughout the summer and doesn't want to peak, if at all, until the fall. My plan even before hearing the podcast was to dial back the workouts. After hearing the podcast, I just felt reinforced in the idea that I was planning this season the right way. I've warned her a few times, do these workouts too hard and you'll peak in June or July, keep them how I want you to and you'll continue to gain fitness throughout the summer and we can think about hitting a peak in the fall.

Offline cesar

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Re: Always Ready To Race
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2011, 01:55:39 PM »
I still dont understand very well. As Rubio stresses, you do an interval workout at 1500-10k race pace and tempo runs on the weekend, plus the racing, if you are doing the workouts at race pace, you are not holding back at all, for example, at the beginning of the season I do for example 5 x 1000s in 4 mins (6:26 per mile)around 5k race pace or 5 x 1 mile at 10k race pace (at those paces I am forcing enough to be a hard workout) . At what time should I do it with 4-8 weeks ( according to the article) before the Goal race?

Offline Ryan

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Re: Always Ready To Race
« Reply #6 on: May 06, 2011, 07:21:09 PM »
Well, maybe Rubio's workouts are 6x800 or even 8x400 at 5K pace, maybe 4-6x1200 at 10K pace. Maybe recoveries are longer. Pace is only one component of the overall intensity of a workout.

As an example, Tuesday, I did about 3.5 miles at about 10 mile race effort. Thursday, I did 8x2:00 at about 5K effort with 1:00 slow jog recoveries. Neither of these workouts was all that taxing. Neither left me dragging the next day. This is what you're looking for.

Offline cesar

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Re: Always Ready To Race
« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2011, 05:43:13 AM »
Thanks Ryan, I now get it. What if one wants to increase mileage? Do you still do the workouts and increase mileage at the same time?
« Last Edit: May 07, 2011, 05:53:06 AM by cesar »

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Always Ready To Race
« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2011, 09:37:01 PM »
This has always been around.  In the 70's and 80's it seemed many guys raced all the time...and well.  Some tolerated it
very well.  Bill Rodgers and Robert de Castella come immediatly to mind...though many perscribed to year around racing.
According to Frank Shorter, he also trained similarly.  Deek's training under Clohessy was the basis for Wardlaw's Complex System.  There are, of course, more contemporary examples, as well.

If you want to put it all on the line and have your best performance possible at a single race, then this type of training isn't for you. This is for the person who wants to run well from the spring right through the fall. You'll give up a little on the peak but you'll be ready for a good performance at any race that comes along for a long period of time.
Not necessarily so.  Rubio says so right in the article:
Quote
From my experience coaching beginners up to national champions and Olympians, I've noticed that they often race better in a pre-competitive training pattern than they do when they try to peak using all three phases. In many cases an athlete will race better going straight into a pre-competitive phase of training without spending the traditional two to three months solely focused on building a base phase.
Indeed, once one has truly established a solid fitness base the first time then - provided there are not significant breaks for injury or more than a couple weeks at the end of a competitive racing season - there seems to be not only little need to keep going back to 'reestablish' a base via a long training phase for each racing season but it can also be counterproductive if one is neglecting to work on other aspects that tie into performance.  There likely are mental/emotional benefits to racing frequently towards a peak rather than rigidly keeping the focus almost exclusively on training.
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline blink180

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Re: Always Ready To Race
« Reply #9 on: May 09, 2011, 03:53:53 AM »
Wondering if any folks here have read Joe Rubio's "Always Ready to Race" in this month's Running Times?

Offline grasshopper

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Re: Always Ready To Race
« Reply #10 on: May 09, 2011, 07:05:33 AM »
It appears that all who clicked the link at the top of the thread did.  ;D

Offline Ryan

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Re: Always Ready To Race
« Reply #11 on: May 09, 2011, 08:02:00 AM »
Andrew, I know Rubio states that and I agree to some extent with him. However, at a higher level, I would disagree with him. Not many people ever come close to it and not many people even have any interest in doing so but, if you want to and are serious about it, you'll most likely not reach your full performance potential without some peaking plan. You will come close but not quite hit that ultimate peak.

Many people run worse on a peaking plan because they don't do it right. That's not the fault of the plan, it's the fault of the implementation.

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Always Ready To Race
« Reply #12 on: May 09, 2011, 03:41:59 PM »
Perhaps I misstated or was unclear.  This type of a plan certain can build to a peak as well as any other -- the proverbial Lydiard pyramid is far from the only way to peak.  Simmons, et al. absolutely peak their runners.
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline Ryan

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Re: Always Ready To Race
« Reply #13 on: May 10, 2011, 06:21:15 AM »
Yes, they can build to a peak at the end of the season with a month or two of work. Actually, you maintain yourself so close to peak that you can actually get there relatively quickly at any time. However, from personal experience, I'm still not sure it's quite the same quality of a peak as a more "traditional" peaking plan. Back to my earlier point and Rubio's point, though, most people want to race well for a longer period of time which makes the matter of the peak irrelevant.

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Always Ready To Race
« Reply #14 on: May 10, 2011, 11:24:07 PM »
Yes, they can build to a peak at the end of the season with a month or two of work.
Or even three or four or more months.
Quote
Actually, you maintain yourself so close to peak that you can actually get there relatively quickly at any time. However, from personal experience, I'm still not sure it's quite the same quality of a peak as a more "traditional" peaking plan.
Because world records have not been set and gold medals have not been won by runners who have trained this way?
Quote
Back to my earlier point and Rubio's point, though, most people want to race well for a longer period of time which makes the matter of the peak irrelevant.
This reminds me of the quantity or quality discussion and my typical response: with a smart approach, you can have both.  8)
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Tags: training joe rubio