Author Topic: Mom, can I run a marathon?  (Read 1587 times)

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Offline Andrew A.

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Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline Ryan

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Re: Mom, can I run a marathon?
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2009, 11:29:19 AM »
I'm so tired of this straw man argument:

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"The growing problem of childhood obesity and inactivity would seem to dwarf any problems related to running a marathon"

As if there is no middle ground between childhood obesity and childhood marathoners. Might I propose that an option better than either of those would involve shorter race distances?

I see a very similar argument from adults who want to rush into a marathon before they are ready. The same concept applies. Instead of deciding between the best of two extreme and poor options, take the much more sound middle road.

Offline r-at-work

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Re: Mom, can I run a marathon?
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2009, 05:51:12 PM »
I'm sure there are a few exceptional youth out there but most of the teenagers I've encountered in the last 7 years since my kids started into HS don't want to train... my kids enjoyed racing and 'some' training with their teams but certainly not what would be needed for a marathon... I think the minimalistic approach to the marathon for a youth would be even worse than what you see in adults... on the other hand I have seen two HS kids who jogged through a marathon in the fall after XC season with a couple extra long runs, but they did it with a parent who was MUCH slower (race pace) so it was less than a full effort, neither had any problems afterward but said they would wait till they were out of college and had time to train better before attempting another (at their REAL pace)... I didn't have the heart to tell them that if they couldn't find time while in college they might never find the kind of time they think they need...

but yeah, there has to be something between OBESE and marathon-runner... my kids liked to run 5Ks before it got un-cool to be seen with their mom...
-Rita
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Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Mom, can I run a marathon?
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2009, 06:41:45 PM »
I'm so tired of this straw man argument:

Quote
"The growing problem of childhood obesity and inactivity would seem to dwarf any problems related to running a marathon"

As if there is no middle ground between childhood obesity and childhood marathoners.
Never mind that the increasing popularity of adults running marathons has coincided with a steep rise in obesity among adults -- clearly there is essentially no connection between obesity and marathon running.
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline Ryan

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Re: Mom, can I run a marathon?
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2009, 06:09:02 AM »
Rita, not only do most kids not do the training to handle a marathon. Those who do would still be better served running shorter distances. As for the "until they are out of college" thing, that's absolutely the right choice if they are going to be competing for their schools. The collegiate racing season already drags on through most of the school year. The last thing they need is to extend that by fitting a marathon into the year somewhere.

Andrew, great point. If there were any relationship between marathon participation and obesity, it doesn't seem to be the one that these people are suggesting (in my opinion, great evidence that there is no relationship). It doesn't have to be all or nothing. In this case, the most ideal place is the middle ground.

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