Author Topic: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart  (Read 10562 times)

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Offline Andrew A.

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Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline Ryan

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2009, 07:35:48 PM »
I have to agree with the final sentence. First, I do everything in my power to keep my daughter from making a scene in public and her occasional scenes are very short. However, if anyone ever did anything like that to her, it would take everything I had to not just lay into him. I'd do my best to avoid escalating the situation but I have to admit, it would probably be the most difficult thing I would ever do.

Offline r-at-work

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2009, 07:05:18 AM »
one look at that guy's pleasant face  ::) and I could see he was having more than a bad day... I've only had one of my kids throw a tantrum in public, at a mall... it was a "lay down on the floor and cry" thing... I pulled him over to one side and let him go at it... I did have several women come up and ask me what was wrong... I told them that he was in the process of throwing a tantrum and I wasn't giving in (and letting him play video games)... they all voice opinioins that made it sound like I was not only doing the right thing but they weren't sure they would be 'strong' enough to let their kid embarass them...I told them he was only embarassing himself... my older son was mortified

on the other hand I've been in MANY stores, sometime late at night, and seen parents with crying children, some sobbing that they were hungry or tired or had to go to the bathroom... I hate to say it, but I think lots of parents don't realize that kids have a lower tolerance for those things than adults as children have almost no control over their lives, except to cry. What I usually say to parents is "poor mom" or "poor dad" as I know that this might be able to get to the store.

The only time I spanked my kids was when they ran into the street.

I would be interested to know if that guy had any kids. I'd also be interested to see what kind of defense he puts up, maybe just no contest and pay the fine.
-Rita



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Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2009, 07:59:31 AM »
He is being charged with a felony, I suspect he might not get off very lightly, unless the mother decides it is not worth pressing charges.
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
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Offline Ryan

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2009, 09:23:51 AM »
Rita, I have seen some parents do things with their kids that I would disagree with. If you always give in to a tantrum, when you are in a store and can't, it's going to get ugly. I've also seen parents seemingly doing everything right and the kid just has to get it out. I've been in that position. Fortunately, I don't give in to a tantrum so she knows they won't work and she gives up quickly (she also knew what a time out was before she was 18 months old and knows that she better shape up quickly when a warning is given) but it can be tough in a public place. It's not like the parent wants the kid to make a scene but it sometimes happens.

I've by no means gotten everything figured out in just under 20 months but I have had some good guidance and figured a few things out. Unfortunately, some people don't have the benefit of the kind of guidance I've received.

As for this specific situation, though, we don't know the story. Maybe the mother was letting a tantrum like your scenario play out. Maybe the mother didn't have control of her child. Maybe something else. No matter what, though, no stranger has the right to strike anybody's two year old. I hope he does get the book thrown at him. He deserves to.

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2009, 10:09:07 AM »
Maybe it is a sign of the times.  I grew up in a time when you could be disciplined by people in your community who knew you (granted, that is not the case with this guy as he was a complete stranger) or your parents.  I took "pops" in school and I am sure that as much as I did not like them that I did deserve them and they were of benefit.  I do not recall crying babies in stores or in restaurants back then, either.  I think maybe it signifies a shift in our society, that we have lost the cohesiveness of community to the degree that we do not care as much about each other.  Disciplining a child, even one you do not know, is showing that you care about your community and the individuals within it -- you want to see that child getting the right message and reinforcement of good behavior.  If you do not care then you just ignore it and hope it goes away on its own.  Same with letting your kids annoy others with their out-of-control antics in public settings like stores and restaurants.  I am not saying anyone here is guilty of that, but I know you have likely witnessed instances of that.  If you care about your community then you take steps to remedy that behavior.  If you care only about yourself, then you just let the kids do whatever.  I have heard stories of waitstaff approaching parents to ask that they control their kids only to be upbraided by those same parents.  I know parents who would be horrified if their kids behaved that way in public and would hurriedly leave the scene with their children to find a more isolated spot to address the discipline.  That just seems increasingly rare anymore.  And so then we will see people who did come up in a time when there was more personal accountability within a more cohesive community and they are not used to the excessive poor behavior (from both children and parents) and react badly.  Not an excuse for this guy, lack of control on the part of others is not a good reason to lose control yourself, but a possible explanation.  There is just so much separation and isolation anymore, and I paint myself with that same brush. 

Of course, he was shopping at Wal-Mart, so maybe that is what you get when you do that. ;)
« Last Edit: September 03, 2009, 10:17:41 AM by Andrew A. »
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Offline Ed

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2009, 11:27:18 AM »
Carefull Andrew -

It sounds like you are syaing that the poorer people that shop at Wal-Mart deserve less respect than those that can afford the more expensive stores.  ;)
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Offline Ed

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2009, 11:37:18 AM »
Also - if an individual tried to touch my child - Oh Lord help that person!  An individual's mere annoyance at the antics or issues of a child cannot be an excuse to even think that they could touch that child.

It is usually the childless adults that whine the most about children - crying and tantrums and all that.

I will defend my family to the point that any threat is 100% incapacitated. 
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Offline Ryan

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2009, 12:00:45 PM »
I don't think things have changed as much as you seem to think they do. When my daughter is old enough that she might be under someone else's supervision or otherwise playing with the neighborhood kids outside of my supervision, if she does something she shouldn't, I hope whoever is supervising will discipline her. However, they better not lay out any physical punishment. This is the same thing I've heard my mother say. She expected others to discipline my brother and myself when we weren't under her supervision but, if anyone laid a hand on us, she would have come down full force on them. In my opinion, that's just appropriate. It was when I was a kid and it still is when I am a parent. You discipline other kids but leave physical punishment decisions to the parents.

As for kids crying in public, I agree. If you can't get the kid to calm down quickly, then you get the kid out of the public setting as quickly as possible. Of course, if you can't carry the child and they are doing one of those laying on the floor tantrums, your options may be limited. I remember seeing tantrums years ago, though they were not nearly as frequent as I see today. Maybe I didn't notice them, maybe I'm now in places with more people so I should expect more, maybe they really are happening more often. I can't say. I do know that I am never comfortable when Shayla starts crying in public and I will always try to either get her to stop or get her removed from the public place as quickly as possible when she does. You might hear her cry if she's at a store or restaurant with me but you won't hear her crying for long. She will either be gone or calmed down. I think more parents are like this than you realize. It's the kid throwing a tantrum for 15 minutes that you notice, not the many who don't throw any tantrum or who cry for a minute or less before calming down or being removed from the situation.

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2009, 01:42:34 PM »
[Careful] Andrew -

It sounds like you are [saying] that the poorer people that shop at Wal-Mart deserve less respect than those that can afford the more expensive stores.  ;)
Not poorer, just not classy.  Far wealthier people than I shop Wal-Mart. 8)
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
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Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2009, 02:04:39 PM »
As for kids crying in public, I agree. If you can't get the kid to calm down quickly, then you get the kid out of the public setting as quickly as possible. Of course, if you can't carry the child and they are doing one of those laying on the floor tantrums, your options may be limited. I remember seeing tantrums years ago, though they were not nearly as frequent as I see today. Maybe I didn't notice them, maybe I'm now in places with more people so I should expect more, maybe they really are happening more often. I can't say. I do know that I am never comfortable when Shayla starts crying in public and I will always try to either get her to stop or get her removed from the public place as quickly as possible when she does. You might hear her cry if she's at a store or restaurant with me but you won't hear her crying for long. She will either be gone or calmed down. I think more parents are like this than you realize. It's the kid throwing a tantrum for 15 minutes that you notice, not the many who don't throw any tantrum or who cry for a minute or less before calming down or being removed from the situation.
If a kid you cannot carry is throwing a tantrum in public then there is likely a lot that has been overlooked leading up to that point -- it is not really what happens then and there that matters, it is what did not happen in the hours, days, months, and even years prior that matters.  Is the kid obese?  Is the kid old enough that it should have been given stricter discipline all along?  Does the kid have a chemical imbalance to the point that more than just one person should be along on any outing at any age, for the safety of all involved? 

You are right, it is the ones that are really bad and allowed to continue to be bad that really get noticed, not something that lasts for less than a minute.  Also, parents I know are usually more attuned to these things than I am.  Where I live, there are plenty of parents who think it is a great idea to bring their tots with them to bars late in the evening.  That seems akin to a bunch of rowdy frat boys or bikers rolling up to Chuck E. Cheese to pound some pitchers.  I also recently had the noisy-baby-in-a-movie-theater experience, the mother apparently thought it was okay to just bring it along and did not feel compelled take it out.
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline Ed

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #11 on: September 04, 2009, 07:21:28 AM »
Children do not under any circumstance belong in bars nor do they belong in any movies that they will not be able to follow/appreciate/understand.

I would never consider taking one of my children to a movie that was not made for children.  When my children were younger and the youngest started to cry or act up during the movie I took him out into the lobby.  It would have been inconsiderate to do anything else.

Parents are very often looked down upon for utilizing physical punishment - how can anyone begin to condone a stranger applying physical punishment.
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Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #12 on: September 04, 2009, 08:47:00 AM »
I don't think things have changed as much as you seem to think they do. When my daughter is old enough that she might be under someone else's supervision or otherwise playing with the neighborhood kids outside of my supervision, if she does something she shouldn't, I hope whoever is supervising will discipline her. However, they better not lay out any physical punishment. This is the same thing I've heard my mother say. She expected others to discipline my brother and myself when we weren't under her supervision but, if anyone laid a hand on us, she would have come down full force on them. In my opinion, that's just appropriate. It was when I was a kid and it still is when I am a parent. You discipline other kids but leave physical punishment decisions to the parents.
To revisit this for a moment, I think things have changed more than you seem to think they have.  Did your grandparents never spank you?  Mine did with me and my sister.  I am sure that my parents had family members who disciplined them, even with a spanking, while in the care of a relative.  Now I am also sure that a relative or family friend would want to find the parent to discipline a misbehaving child, but if that were not possible I am certain that it would have been deemed appropriate by the parents that a fitting disciplinary punishment was given in the moment of the misbehavior.  I know I have read plenty in literature set in the past about kids receiving physical punishment at the hand of someone other than their parents.  Did you ever receive corporal punishment in school?  Like I said, I did.  My parents did not go to the principal to complain about it.  Despite all this, my sense to this day is that my parents were sheltering and overprotective of me.  Given the more transient nature of modern society, not to mention ever-shifting values, it seems like there is less connection between neighbors (i.e. if you see any kid on the street near your home, can you immediately tell who his or her parents would be?) and thus a diminished sense of personal accountability within the community.  This is born out in public statements made by people like Bill Cosby and Jim Brown -- their commentary may be specific to the African-American community, yet that community does not exist in a vacuum and there are impacts both to and from the whole of western society.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2009, 09:19:13 AM by Andrew A. »
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Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #13 on: September 04, 2009, 08:54:58 AM »
Children do not under any circumstance belong in bars nor do they belong in any movies that they will not be able to follow/appreciate/understand.

I would never consider taking one of my children to a movie that was not made for children.  When my children were younger and the youngest started to cry or act up during the movie I took him out into the lobby.  It would have been inconsiderate to do anything else.
Right, and I was seeing a documentary film, not "UP."  I think in that case (as well as with bars and so on) the parents wanted to do what they wanted to do but did not want to bother getting a babysitter.  I noted many young kids when I went to see "Transformers 2" earlier this summer -- they did not bother me at all, but I was a bit disconcerted that parents thought nothing of exposing their kids to that level of violence, even if it is animated and between robots.  Of course, this is something I experienced growing up, as well.  My parents would not let me see movies like "Rambo" even though many of my peers saw movies like that at the same age. 
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline r-at-work

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #14 on: September 04, 2009, 12:05:58 PM »
If a kid you cannot carry is throwing a tantrum in public then there is likely a lot that has been overlooked leading up to that point -- it is not really what happens then and there that matters, it is what did not happen in the hours, days, months, and even years prior that matters.  Is the kid obese?  Is the kid old enough that it should have been given stricter discipline all along?  Does the kid have a chemical imbalance to the point that more than just one person should be along on any outing at any age, for the safety of all involved? 

when my kids had his melt down I was a single mom, I'm 5'2", was was 6 y.o. and already over 50 pounds but not fat, just really solid... he has no organic issues, just that day he couldn't deal with my decision (not to play video games at the mall, just pick up the ONE thing we needed and go home)... so I guess I'm saying that I have empathy for the parent of the screaming kid... it's possible that this parent was at Walmart between a job & getting the kids home from the sitter and had no one else to help and was trying to ignore the tantrum... raising kids is a process, even with the best advice each kid is a new path, each day and every day...

the GUY that slapped the kid does need to have to book thrown at him... no question there...this was not a relative or family friend giving aid, it he really didn't like it he could have walked away and acted like an adult or asked the parent if everything was okay (which it clearly wasn't, but maybe the parent really did need help)
-Rita
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Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #15 on: September 04, 2009, 05:02:53 PM »
There are many possibilities.  On the other hand, I know from observation and experience that parents can be irrationally defensive of their young (a natural biological response) and that might play a role here.  This sort of thing does not just happen out of the blue, there are surely reasons behind it from each participant's involvement.  Ignoring one's own child's tantrum does not require subjecting innocent bystanders to it.  Then there is the fact that there are a whole lot of unfit parents in this country -- not saying whether the mother in question is, but we have all seen them or might bear the consequences someday.
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
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Offline Ryan

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #16 on: September 09, 2009, 07:17:17 AM »
Honestly, while I didn't get in trouble a lot, I can't recall grandparents, teachers, or anyone but my parents using physical punishment on me. I don't think I would be opposed to a grandparent using physical punishment but that is even different than a neighbor.

As for neighborhoods, I know what you mean but all neighborhoods are different. One reason for my recent move was the neighborhood. We moved from a "keep to yourself" kind of neighborhood to one where people do know each other, where people even on the other side of the 70-some home neighborhood know each other by first name, where you can see a kid riding bike down the sidewalk and know who the kid's parents are. Maybe this isn't the typical neighborhood but it's one that we chose to move to largely because of factors like this.

As for this particular scenario, we will probably never know the family dynamics that led to the tantrum. Maybe the parents had not been doing a good job. Surely, the parents made at least a few mistakes along the way (who doesn't?) and maybe they made a lot of mistakes or maybe they just didn't care enough to try to correct the mistakes. Regardless of that, though, I keep going back to one thing. Any parent who would not have a big problem with a complete stranger hitting their child is, in my opinion, an unfit parent. This guy was completely in the wrong and should have the book thrown at him.

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #17 on: September 09, 2009, 08:26:38 PM »
"Throwing the book at him" if he did not injure the child is as over-the-top of a response as his was.  Being arrested and pleading to a lesser (misdemeanor rather than felony) charge might teach him a deserved lesson.  So far there seems to be a desire only to sympathize with the parent and not with the man.  It could be that he has hearing aids that are highly sensitive to the shrill shrieks of toddlers and that for the past decade he has been subjected to the shrill shrieks of other people's tots on half or more of his visits to MallWart and all those other times he has simply walked away.  Perhaps something else was going on and he was having a bad day, week, month, or year -- maybe he had a GM pension that was cut or his wife's medical insurance had been dropped.  Dealing with the thoughtlessness of others can be trying at times.  I know I have said regrettable things when I have felt pushed to my breaking point.  I get the sense that he was not assaulting the child and had no intent to harm but felt that if the parent was not going to adequately discipline this child then he would.  He was certainly out-of-line and there is no excuse for it, yet I know I have felt a similar impulse when dealing again and again with people who apparently thought nothing of foisting their undisciplined, unruly, and unleashed dogs on other people on trails where I live.  If those people do not care enough about their dogs (not to mention fellow trail users) to train and discipline them or keep them leashed then it is left to me to administer some sort of reinforcement to keep them from charging/jumping on me.  If I have to decide whether I allow a dog to possibly injure me or use force to avert what appears to me to be inevitable physical contact then I will choose the latter.  I will never get why people presume that anyone and everyone else along the same trail that they are using is interested in meeting their dog(s).  I love dogs but when I am out to run I am spending my time to focus on that and without any interest in playing with random dogs.  I do not presume that everyone else out there to meet me and shake my hand, so I do not run up to them yapping away with my hand extended.  Anyway, I am getting off on a tangent here.  I was in a store this evening and was on an aisle with a mother who was there with her shrieking young child.  As I observed, the mother was doing as little as possible to get the little girl to behave.  Not that this is necessarily the case in this story, but at the end of a work/school day there could easily be impatience and grouchiness on the part of a kid and apathy/lack of energy to deal with it on the part of the parent.  Again, not an excuse and it is out-of-line to subject innocent bystanders to the fallout, but I do understand that this is a reality for a lot of people and it seems like they are either incognizant or unconcerned with how it might affect anyone else and how sensitive they might be to it for any number of reasons.  It is a two-way street and I think that, at least in certain locales, that a breakdown in common courtesy and thoughtfulness regarding others has led to the proliferation of this type of situation.
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
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Offline Ryan

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #18 on: September 10, 2009, 06:42:20 AM »
First, "throw the book" was probably a poor term to use. I hope he gets a punishment that fits his actions, which I would still argue were quite severe.

As for your comparison between a kid throwing a tantrum in public and dogs running loose, I'm sorry but I don't see the comparison. One is an admittedly extreme annoyance, another is a safety issue. As far as I'm aware, the number of incidents where someone had to seek medical treatment due to listening to a toddler throw a tantrum is pretty low. In the United States, nearly two people every minute seek medical treatment due to dog bites (and these are only the cases where the doctor reports the cause of the injury as dog bite, surely understating all dog related injuries which are not always reported as bites). I understand your point of common courtesy but I simply disagree that these two types of incidents, beyond some base level of common courtesy, have anything in common.

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #19 on: September 10, 2009, 08:21:45 AM »
That is perhaps because you are looking without a broad enough perspective.  In either situation, the essential result is others having to deal with the side-effects of someone else's lack of control, irrespective of the details of possible outcomes.  When you are sitting in a restaurant and someone's kid shrieks and/or starts running around and raising a ruckus, it is a rude interruption of your activity, an activity that is not bothering anyone else.  When you are running in a park and someone's dog runs up to you playfully (or not), it is a rude interruption of your activity, an activity that is not bothering anyone else.  Another example might be thoughtless drivers, which carries even greater possible danger yet still often necessitates others who did not invite it having to deal with it.  To repeat, dealing with the thoughtlessness of others can be trying at times.  It can bring forth similar impulses regardless of the actual cause and possible outcomes.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2009, 08:24:40 AM by Andrew A. »
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Offline Ryan

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #20 on: September 10, 2009, 02:56:59 PM »
Maybe we're just viewing this from different angles. Regardless of dealing with side-effects on someone else, one is an annoyance and another is a danger. Thoughtless drivers are also a danger. There are many annoyances that we deal with every day. Some people find how I dress to run annoying and think my wardrobe choice is thoughtless, some might find my way of landscaping my yard or the fact that I don't always mow the lawn as soon as the grass is getting a bit long annoying. People get over annoyances every day, even multiple times a day. People shouldn't have to get over unnecessary risks.

Also, when a child is throwing a tantrum, there is no immediate risk (is there any risk?) to one's health. When a dog is chasing you, there is. Defending yourself from a chasing dog is far different than slapping a stranger's toddler.

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #21 on: September 10, 2009, 03:40:29 PM »
I never claimed there were no differences in the details, but you are seemingly trying to insist that there are zero similarities.  Perhaps I am not communicating my point clearly enough.  If I do not like the way you look, I can just not look at you.  Same with your yard.  The three examples I gave are intrusive annoyances.  Regardless of the possible consequences of each, they are still essentially that.  Others would include someone choosing to mow the lawn or fire up their leaf blower or gun their motorcycle's engine or hammer nails or cut wood with a chainsaw near your home at 3 a.m.  No, they do not present much danger to one's safety yet they are not easily avoidable and, bottom line, they are someone else's responsibility.  Danger or not, nobody sought your permission before inflicting loud noises on you while you were asleep, or dining out, or shopping, or before letting their dog chase you or before driving in a highly discourteous manner.  They just did it without regard to the feelings of your or anyone else.  Each is the result of the thoughtlessness of someone else and results in others having to deal with noise or danger.  I am no immediate risk (is there any risk?) to your health if I run up to you and jabber away with my hand thrust out to shake, yet you have to deal with that intrusive behavior in one way or another and you did not invite it simply by being in that place at that time. 
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #22 on: September 11, 2009, 07:34:14 AM »
Just as you never claimed there were no differences in details, I never claimed there were no similarities, just that in my opinion the differences in seriousness of infringement. I guess we'll have to agree to disagree on this one and continue to view it from different angles. I understand where you're coming from but I also think we can find many things that people, even ourselves, do that some might consider infringing on themselves. As a parent, I can tell you that parents don't get to choose when a tantrum is thrown. You can only deal with it when it happens. In almost any case, I'd choose to remove the child from the public setting and I think most parents also would but, in some scenarios, that may be a choice that is, at best, difficult to make.

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #23 on: September 11, 2009, 08:38:09 AM »
I do not disagree, yet at the very basic, conceptual level those are all uninvited "infringements."  I also see it as being a difference between things that fall very obviously into that category of immediacy and relatively innocuous things such as not matching your shirt to your pants or letting your grass grow more than three inches tall.  Some things you can block out and ignore and some things you simply cannot.  There is also a difference between a parent swiftly dealing with a child screeching (loud noise is an assault to the senses) in a restaurant or a store and a parent blithely disregarding it and continuing to irresponsibly subject others to it.
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
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Offline Ed

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #24 on: September 18, 2009, 01:13:02 PM »
As a parent I must add my two cents.

Sometimes a parent has no choice of when to complete some neccessity shopping (prescription medication) and therefore cannot leave.  Parents have been told that spanking is physical abuse, yelling is emotional abuse - so what are we left with?  Reasoning?  With a todler that is in tantrum mode -yeah right!

Also, I am kind of curious as how a crying child is an "assault" to the senses when a fully grown adult male physically slapping a child is not assault.

Lastly, no set of circumstances that the man had been in should ever be an excuse to touch another individual - child or adult.
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Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #25 on: September 18, 2009, 04:43:17 PM »
As a parent I must add my two cents.

Sometimes a parent has no choice of when to complete some [necessity] shopping (prescription medication) and therefore cannot leave.  Parents have been told that spanking is physical abuse, yelling is emotional abuse - so what are we left with?  Reasoning?  With a [toddler] that is in tantrum mode -yeah right!
So tantrums must be dealt with in the middle of a crowd?  Why?  Funny, but I have seen and heard of plenty of parents taking their kids to a quiet, isolated place (outside the store or restaurant) until the kid is calm enough to return.  As opposed to the woman I witnessed in the grocery store last week who essentially did nothing to quell repeated outbursts.  Why did she allow that?

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Also, I am kind of curious as how a crying child is an "assault" to the senses when a fully grown adult male physically slapping a child is not assault.
I am kind of curious where you got the idea that it is not, as that is a disturbingly deviant suggestion.

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Lastly, no set of circumstances that the man had been in should ever be an excuse to touch another individual - child or adult.
Thank you for pointing out the obvious, since you now agree with the rest of us on that I expect world peace to commence immediately. ;)
« Last Edit: September 18, 2009, 04:48:52 PM by Andrew A. »
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Offline Ed

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #26 on: September 18, 2009, 10:56:26 PM »
A crying child is an assault to the senses?  I have thicker skin than that.  It must be a tough life if little things like that are appearently that disturbing to an individual.  People need to learn to toughen up in life and suck up things that bug them - to a point of course. 

Maybe that young child that was assaulting your senses had an ear infection or was sick and the mother was obtaining some neccessities for treating that child.  Maybe not - but maybe. 

I do not allow my children to display that type of behavior in public becuase I want to teach them that good and or proper behavior gets the attention that they are looking to receive.
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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #27 on: September 19, 2009, 07:36:20 AM »
A crying child is an assault to the senses?  I have thicker skin than that.  It must be a tough life if little things like that are [apparently] that disturbing to an individual.  People need to learn to toughen up in life and suck up things that bug them - to a point of course. 

Maybe that young child that was assaulting your senses had an ear infection or was sick and the mother was obtaining some [necessities] for treating that child.  Maybe not - but maybe.
I have thicker skin than that, too, yet I do not presume to speak for how thick everyone else's skin should be -- i.e. what everyone else should gladly put up with.  Maybe I am out (not at Chuck E. Cheese or Mickey D's) having a nice quiet meal and my date is annoyed by someone who is allowing their kid to scream in a restaurant for the entire meal.  How wise would it be to cop your attitude and tell her to "just suck it up?"  Would you be as "thick skinned" and understanding if a bunch of frat boys or bikers the next booth over from you were being obnoxiously loud while you were out for a nice, quiet meal with your wife?  How about if the neighbors had a party on Tuesday night in their back yard with loud music going until 3 a.m.? 

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I do not allow my children to display that type of behavior in public [because] I want to teach them that good and or proper behavior gets the attention that they are looking to receive.
Exactly.  So why defend the crappy parents who allow it?
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
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Offline Andrew A.

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Re: Stranger Slaps Mother's Crying Toddler At Georgia Wal-Mart
« Reply #28 on: September 19, 2009, 01:01:05 PM »
Carefull Andrew -

It sounds like you are syaing that the poorer people that shop at Wal-Mart deserve less respect than those that can afford the more expensive stores.  ;)


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Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

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