Author Topic: The Story of Cap and Trade  (Read 3127 times)

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Offline Andrew A.

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The Story of Cap and Trade
« on: December 19, 2009, 03:29:17 PM »

The Story of Cap & Trade from Story of Stuff Project on Vimeo.

The Story of Cap & Trade is a fast-paced, fact-filled look at the leading climate solution being discussed at Copenhagen and on Capitol Hill. Host Annie Leonard introduces the energy traders and Wall Street financiers at the heart of this scheme and reveals the "devils in the details" in current cap and trade proposals: free permits to big polluters, fake offsets and distraction from whatís really required to tackle the climate crisis. If youíve heard about Cap & Trade, but arenít sure how it works (or who benefits), this is the film is for you.

« Last Edit: December 19, 2009, 03:33:27 PM by Andrew A. »
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Offline Ed

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Re: The Story of Cap and Trade
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2010, 12:58:43 PM »
We cannot leave it to governments to solve the issues - they will never accomplish anything real. 

It has to be done through consumers.  We need to pressure industry to make changes by taking our purchases to "greener" companies. 

I do not think that each household really has much of an impact on the environment.  For example - an average home probably has an average gas/electric energy bill of (what) $200.00 per month.  A local steel manufacturer had an average monthly electric bill of $1,000,000.00 (yes that is monthly!)  That is equivalent to nearly 5,000 residential homes.  If all residential homes cut their energy consumption by 10% it would take nearly 50,000 homes to negate the energy impact of this one business.

Question then becomes - How do we convince a company like this to reduce is energy consumption by 10%?  This would be like eliminating 500 residential homes!
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Offline Ryan

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Re: The Story of Cap and Trade
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2010, 01:46:50 PM »
Ed, the problem with this approach is we know nothing about the energy that goes into a product we purchase. I understand where you're coming from but, if the consumer never knows the true environmental impact of one product versus another or, worse, is tricked by deceptive advertising, the consumer can not make an informed choice.

As an example, I think you know where I work. The specific facility I work in became the first large manufacturing facility in the country to become a LEED certified building (before we became LEED certified, it was believed by many that a 25 year old large manufacturing facility could not achieve certification) and we're in the process of getting 2-3 more plants LEED certified, with the goal of being the first large printer to have our entire production platform certified. There is a lot we do to lesson our carbon footprint, from purchasing wind power to capturing emissions and reusing them as fuel to installing anti-idling technology on our trucks and routing them in ways that minimize fuel use and countless things in between. We were the first in our industry in many environmental regards. So let's say you want to reward us for being environmentally conscious and you want to reward our customers for using an environmentally conscious supplier. How do you go about doing that? First, how do you get the information to verify that we are in fact doing a better job than our competitors, especially when everyone is bragging about their environmental accomplishments? Second, in our case, how do you know what we produce so you can but our products as opposed to those from our competitors? Third, how likely are you to let our customers know that the reason you are buying from them is because they made good environmental choices (maybe you will but how likely is the typical person)?

I don't like regulation or any form of government intervention when there is a better way. However, in this case, I'm still waiting to hear of the better way.

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: The Story of Cap and Trade
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2010, 02:20:22 PM »
If left entirely to industry, market forces would not ensure the safety of a deregulated food supply chain, just as an example.  We should not ascribe traits to pure capitalism and market forces that simply are not reflected in reality.  Regulations have always been necessary to ensure the greater good, which unfortunately falls outside of any given corporation's objectives, though it was not always that way.  The main issue in terms of attempting regulations with such broad (i.e. international) reach is that there exists essentially no viable mechanism to enforce them so nations like China comply (or not) based on their own whims as they pertain to short-sighted self-interest or even just posturing and power games.  They can refrain from signing any treaty that they do not like and can even refrain from engaging in treaty negotiations if that is their desire.  So then it enables the short-sighted and defeatist attitude of "well, if they are not sacrificing and carrying their share of the burden then why should we?"  It does not excuse that attitude, but it does explain it and that is often the reality.
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Offline Ed

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Re: The Story of Cap and Trade
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2010, 12:31:47 PM »
As "greener" becomes more and moer popular - we might see industry vying for that image.  Then with the internet being what it is - we as consumers are more empowered to research companies and make informed decisions.

Just a thought.
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Offline Ryan

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Re: The Story of Cap and Trade
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2010, 02:21:48 PM »
Ed, that's part of the problem. Industry is vying for the image but many companies are vying for the image without actually following through in action. They are building a green image without actually becoming green. The big problem is that there is as much misinformation, if not more, as there is good information.

Bad information can be worse than no information and, in this regard especially, there is a lot of bad information out there.

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: The Story of Cap and Trade
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2010, 10:23:06 AM »
Yes, marketing, advertising, greenwashing.  How often do ads and image match reality?  8)
« Last Edit: January 16, 2010, 03:06:14 PM by Andrew A. »
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

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