Author Topic: When Money Came into Running  (Read 10205 times)

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Offline Andrew A.

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Re: When Money Came into Running
« Reply #15 on: September 10, 2011, 08:36:05 AM »
Great runners seem to run as if money were no concern, for the joy of the effort.  :)
Like Geb or Meb?  Those two seem to orchestrate their every race and tactic around paydays.
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: When Money Came into Running
« Reply #16 on: October 05, 2011, 08:59:37 AM »
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline Ryan

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Re: When Money Came into Running
« Reply #17 on: October 05, 2011, 12:10:46 PM »
Symmonds was interviewed on this week's House of Run podcast. He makes some pretty persuasive arguments.

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Re: When Money Came into Running
« Reply #18 on: October 06, 2011, 09:16:04 PM »
Undoubtedly, yet as Reavis alludes to, persuasive to whom exactly?  The IAAF (as well as USATF) exists primarily to concentrate and preserve power.  Unless and until enough of the top stars are convinced to take collective action (a la NBA, MLB, NFL players' unions) then the powers that be have no good reason to listen to them.  (See: advent of professionalism in road racing and then track.)  Talk is cheap, action that threatens the income of the powerful is what will get them to sit up and pay attention.  Symmonds's suggestions may indeed be great for the athletes and may provide additional benefits for federations and the power structure, but it benefits those seeking to hang onto their power none to rock the boat and deviate from the status quo.  Their feet have to be held to fire, so they can convince their own supporters that they had no choice.
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: When Money Came into Running
« Reply #19 on: October 07, 2011, 05:33:18 PM »
Another related topic: http://runningtimes.com/Article.aspx?ArticleID=24104
I am not a fan of ____-only prize money, at least not at the upper echelon of the sport.  It smacks of xenophobia and of charity.
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline Ryan

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Re: When Money Came into Running
« Reply #20 on: October 09, 2011, 04:23:00 PM »
That's true and Symmonds alluded to that. He did mention the athletes association but, if I recall, pointed out that athletes would have to be more forceful in organizing because one or two guys saying they need more ability to raise money for themselves won't hold much power.

Offline SF/John

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Offline Andrew A.

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Re: When Money Came into Running
« Reply #22 on: November 03, 2011, 07:33:20 PM »
http://runningtimes.com/Article.aspx?ArticleID=24334
Interesting view and Morse makes some good points.  I still feel that there should be a higher focus on prize money (deeper) than on appearance fees and that for events like WMM there should be some publicized structure (floor, ceiling, performance levels tied to fee levels) in place, which would help with the income perception for the sport and ensure better uniformity in field quality among races at that level.
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline Ryan

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Re: When Money Came into Running
« Reply #23 on: November 04, 2011, 06:29:46 AM »
Agreed on all points. Pay for performance, not just to show up. I'm not saying appearance fees shouldn't exist but they should be a smaller piece of the pie and prize money should be a larger piece of the pie.

As well, I know each race is its own entity and one race may not have the deep pockets and revenue sources another has but I think there definitely should be a floor on the WMM events. If you want to be a world major, pay like a world major.

Also, I've heard it stated and I strongly agree that the amount of money going to the athletes, in whatever form, should be more publicly accessible. Most people have no idea how much money an athlete is making because all they hear is prize money, which is a small part of an athlete's overall income. It makes it sound like running/T&F is a small money sport. Of course, runners aren't getting 20 million a year like athletes in some other sports but I think people would be surprised how much money there is in running if they heard about more than just prize money. Maybe that would attract a few more elites to the sport. If you're a good athlete and have to choose between, say, sprinting and becoming a football wide receiver or middle distance running and soccer, how do you choose if you love both? If your whole family is poor and you figure your athleticism is a way to support your whole family, you might choose football or soccer because of the million dollar paydays. If the athlete knew there was a good amount of money in track and that the risk of a career ending injury was lower, maybe that would affect their decision making.

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: When Money Came into Running
« Reply #24 on: June 26, 2012, 04:44:07 PM »
A follow-up piece from Robinson, well-done as always: http://runningtimes.com/Article.aspx?ArticleID=26392
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline Ryan

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Re: When Money Came into Running
« Reply #25 on: June 27, 2012, 06:18:33 AM »
Another good read. Robinson has some very interesting thoughts on this topic.

Offline SF/John

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