Author Topic: NYRR + NYCM  (Read 7549 times)

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Offline Andrew A.

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Re: NYRR + NYCM
« Reply #15 on: November 03, 2012, 10:01:03 AM »
I suspect that Wittenberg already might have.  She was, in turn, insensitive to locals and then to those coming from out-of-town.  It is apparent that she had zero working contingency plan in place, which is a bad look for a CEO.
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
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Offline Ryan

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Re: NYRR + NYCM
« Reply #16 on: November 03, 2012, 08:04:35 PM »
I think they should have realized it Tuesday, Wednesday at the very latest. The more I think about it, the more I think it was a bad idea to try to hold it from the very beginning. From what I'm hearing, Staten Island is in horrible shape and the last thing they need is tens of thousands of people running through their streets when they are just struggling to return to some semblance of a normal life.

I feel for the runners, especially the elites who were counting on this race as a major source of their yearly income. It has put some of them in a very bad position. However, their livelihoods aren't the only ones being affected. People are talking about comparing the cancellation of this to the non-cancellation of basketball and football games. They have to realize that basketball and football games only affect very small parts of cities. A marathon affects every part of the 26 miles it goes through. There is a big difference, especially if the stadium and arena are in less hard hit parts of the city (as I understand it, they are) than parts of the marathon course.

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: NYRR + NYCM
« Reply #17 on: November 04, 2012, 06:50:37 PM »
Right, the implied comparisons to pro football and pro basketball are silly, at best.  If nothing else, those games could be moved to alternate venues (see: Katrina).  The financials for those sporting events are dependent on both season ticket sales and cable subscription sales and provide salaries for players and staff.  How much of that resembles a marathon, even a WMM event?  Little at all.  If all ground transportation were halted well after Sandy, as it was with Katrina, then no doubt those games would have been moved, postponed, or canceled.  Having dedicated venues for those contests renders moving or postponement far more reasonable.  It was only the subway that was flooded, so only the fans entirely reliant on the subway to get to games would have been unable to get there.  (Never mind that the football stadium is in New Jersey and thus not directly subject to decisions made by NY government agencies.)  As you say, those contests are pretty much confined to the stadium areas, they do not require distributing resources (aid, police, sanitation) along a 26-mile route through the city. 

Also, the notion that they should hold a race for just the invited elites entirely within Central Park would be an insult to all those people who not only paid the exorbitant entry fee, but then spent money on travel and lodging through Friday.  And, honestly, those are the people that this race is really about anymore, the affluent (as noted in the above-linked article, NYRR caters directly, if not entirely, to them) who can afford such extracurricular trips.  The entry fee itself makes that fact quite clear.  I may not be a fan of that fact, but I can recognize that reality and its impact on NYRR decisions.  As such, the affluent masses are given higher consideration than invited elites - NYRR can always entice elites to come back next year, they cannot risk (further) alienating their paying customers.  For the elites who were depending on prize money here to make up a significant part of their annual income, the outcome is no different than if they had become injured in their training build-up.  It is something out of their control.  Also, this is a position that they allowed themselves to be put in.  They let NYRR (and its cohorts) wield this much power.  There is no such thing as guaranteed income from races.  In other (real) pro sports, the players unionize and bargain collectively for better terms for themselves.  Remember concepts like a half-marathon WMM or a minor leagues WMM?  Those would benefit the athletes and provide better income opportunities.  But those are not going to just be offered to them, if they will not organize sufficiently and make demands for their own benefit then they have to accept the status quo, on both small and broad scales.  As it stands, all athletes in road running are independent contractors dealing with corporations that are more powerful than ever.  I know that unions get a bad name, but in today's free market it is the way for labor to make sure its interests are given proper consideration.  Anyway, this is getting sort of rambling and blustery. 

The other answer for those who were so reliant on the NYCM payday: race more.  Greg Meyer and Benji Durden, to name just two, have been known to criticize how seldom today's U.S. elites race.  Why not race two half-marathons and two or three 10Ks and 5Ks in the marathon build-up?  Combined prize money may not net the same as being in the top five at NYCM but it sure helps a lot if one runs into a bad day before or during NYCM or something else unplanned (like a hurricane) takes the possibility of prize money away.  At least they have homes to return to and can race more next month and next year to make up for it - in this specific context we are talking about hundreds and thousands of people who have lost their homes, businesses, and loved ones to this storm, which is not at all comparable on the level of loss.
« Last Edit: November 04, 2012, 07:47:15 PM by Andrew A. »
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

Offline Andrew A.

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Re: NYRR + NYCM
« Reply #18 on: December 08, 2012, 09:37:50 PM »
I like this column from Roger Robinson on the 2012 marathon season, with good commentary on NYCM: http://www.runnersworld.com/rt-columns/roger-running-season-storm-and-stress
Why dink around? Go for it, be the best. It is worth whatever risk there is even if you fall short. You will be better.
‎"There is no such thing as an overachiever. We are all underachievers to varying degrees." - John Wooden.

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