1st long run in a while and I’m tore up!

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  jeremyd 10 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #7406

    jeremyd
    Member

    Hey everybody, new to posting here, but I usually read.

    I started a training program back in December for Madison Marathon.  I have four marathons under my belt, and I was looking to really make a big improvement.  Previously I was running about 55 miles/week, and I started the Pftiz 24/70 plan.  Things went great for the first 2 months and I was ahead of schedule and hitting high 60s for mileage. In late January I felt a twinge on the inside of my knee, tried to run through it, and finally broke down in February.  I met with a sports doc and an ortho specialist, got a few different reasons for the pain, but no consensus.  Bottom line, I took 4 full weeks off with only riding on my trainer for exercise.  I started back slowly, going 10m on week 1, then 15, 20, and then 25.  No issues with my knee.  After my 4th week I got the flu and missed another week.  Last week I did nearly 40, including a 16 mile run.

    here's the problem, the 16mile long run left me tore up.  My quads and hip flexors are spent!I still want to do the Madison Marathon, though I realize i'm not in peak form.  I realize an “A” race is out of the question.

    My plan was to do 20 mile long runthis coming weekend, 20 the following weekend, and then move into a 2 week taper.

    Is this reasonable, or should I scrap the whole spring marathon and work towards a fall marathon?

  • #25078

    GTF
    Member

    Why is such a large proportion of the volume being done in a single run?  Within what context are the 20-mile runs supposed to fall?

  • #25079

    jeremyd
    Member

    Fair question-I just feel as though I need to get that amount of time on my feet to get ready for May 25th.  I'm not exactly sure what to do.  I could boost my weekly mileage to 55-60 with a 20 miler, but I'm worried about the jump in overall weekly mileage. Maybe that shouldn't be as big a concern since I have handled that mileage for about the last year. If you have an idea of how to go about the next couple weeks I would like to hear it!  🙂

  • #25080

    GTF
    Member

    I'm worried about the jump in overall weekly mileage.

    Yet apparently there was/is no concern regarding the jump in longest run mileage and how well (or not) the weekly mileage will support it?  No offense intended but that does not make rational sense.  Are you married to the myth of the 20 miler?  The longest weekly run is not the only or even the main thing that will get you ready for May 25th.  Whatever you feel you are capable of handling on a weekly basis, the longest run (obviously, from the stated results) should not be as high as 40% of the weekly volume.  It would be rather surprising if someone like Pfitzinger would recommend otherwise.  Below 30% (closer to 25%) would likely be more ideal for the level of volume you want to do.  Hope you heal soon and feel well enough to get after a more balanced training regimen.

  • #25081

    robrunrob
    Member

    With other marathons under your belt, general fitness, and a couple of long runs in the bag, I don't see why you can't run this spring marathon.  The question I have is what is the goal of the race for you?  Finishing comfortably and injury free?  Racing to a certain time?  Given how your training has gone so far, I would advocate using the race as a way to build your base back up.  Train through it, have fun on race day, stay healthy and come up with a plan to attack that big improvement in the fall.  Trying to salvage the training you've been able to do so far and piece together a plan to get the improvement now might leave you hurt (either before or after race day) and unable to go for it in the fall.  How long had you been running 55 mpw before December?

  • #25082

    tgrunner
    Member

    I would recommend perhaps running the Madison Marathon if you are set on doing it, but given the training disruption you will likely have to succomb to the fact that it won't be your goal race any longer….maybe enjoy the run and use it as fitness toward the Lakefront? When training doesnt go well, which it hasn't for nearly everyone at one time or another, you can't do much except adjust.

  • #25083

    jeremyd
    Member

    With other marathons under your belt, general fitness, and a couple of long runs in the bag, I don't see why you can't run this spring marathon.  The question I have is what is the goal of the race for you?  Finishing comfortably and injury free?  Racing to a certain time?  Given how your training has gone so far, I would advocate using the race as a way to build your base back up.  Train through it, have fun on race day, stay healthy and come up with a plan to attack that big improvement in the fall.  Trying to salvage the training you've been able to do so far and piece together a plan to get the improvement now might leave you hurt (either before or after race day) and unable to go for it in the fall.  How long had you been running 55 mpw before December?

    I probably had about 4 months of 55mpw. 

    My goal is to finish strong, so I am comfortable really holding back. I think I will take your advice (and tgrunners)and try to train through the marathon. I am signed up for Lakefront-so I'm OK with this idea.

    thanks again guys.

  • #25084

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    I would definitely agree with the others, train through it. You're not going to get a performance you're happy with if you push for time no matter what you do in the next month so run without any time goals. In fact, consider walking breaks.

    As for what to do between now and then, I wouldn't try to jump right into the 20 milers. If you're really sold on needing a 20 miler, something I don't think is necessary physically but may be a mental pick-up, build up more gradually. Something like 18/20 would make more sense to me than jumping straight from 16 to back to back weekends with a 20 miler. Otherwise, realize that some training plans max out at 16-18 miles for the long run. In fact, from what I've been told, it's normal for European training plans to max out at 18.6 miles because that's a nice round number in the metric scale at 30K. 20 miles isn't a magical distance, it's just a round number.

  • #25085

    GTF
    Member

    Or perhaps consider changing to the half-marathon for Madison, if that is possible?

  • #25086

    SBSpartan
    Member

    I know there is no problem with running the Marathon at the end of the month.  Really, you don't need to be worried about getting a 20 miler in either.  Even if you did one the weekend before you should be ok.

    I am all over the place here but even with injury you seem to have a high base already so getting the long runs in won't be that critical.  Like Ryan said, it's mainly just a nice number people attach themselves to.  Getting used to that is more for people who haven't run a marthon before and don't know what it's like to be out for so long.  Having run a few already I think you are fine mentally as you should know what to expect.

    Also, I have run 8 marathons and never gone over 45 miles/week at the peak of training.  Now, I am not as fast as most people here but I did run a 3:42 as a PR. Why am I saying this?  Because I am living proof you are going to be just fine.

    Oh, and 16 miles should hurt based on what you are saying.  Don't make it such a big part of your week.  If I were your friend I would have told you to go out Friday night and run like 4-5 miles then wake up and run 12-13 very early.  Make it a “virtual” 16.  Your body won't know too much about it, but the miles will be spread out enough to not kill you either.  That is one of my goofy theories that I quite like.

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