2 miles in the 12’s

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  erroberts_2000 14 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #1465

    I am running 2 miles in 13:34 right now. I want to be able to get down my time in the 12’s. I have hit a wall. I was woundering if you had any training methods that would help me. I run 5 times a week. 3 times a week I run 3 miles. the other two I run 2 miles. I run as fast as I can each run. I don’t know if I need to rest more or run shorter. I loose the heart to push myself faster than what I am going at the time to run in the 12’s. Any help would really be appreciated.

  • #14418

    Anonymous

    I think you need to get stronger, not faster. Running 5 times per week is a great start. Gradually work on increasing your weekly mileage. Do this by slowing down. Yes, you read that correctly. Not everyone of your runs needs to be balls out. Say you are running your 3 mile runs at 7-7:30 pace, slow down to 8-8:30 and extend them to 4-5 miles. Not only will you get stronger, but you won’t be so wiped out from running fast all the time.

    Zeke

  • #14419

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    erroberts_2000 wrote:
    I run 5 times a week. 3 times a week I run 3 miles. the other two I run 2 miles. I run as fast as I can each run. I don’t know if I need to rest more or run shorter.

    Neither. You need to slow down on some of those runs. Once a week, let it fly. The other times, back off the pace to a conversational pace, basically run at a pace that would allow you to hold a conversation with someone if you were running with someone. Over time, push the distance of one of those conversational pace runs up toward the 5-6 mile range, Adding some distance to the other runs would help but shouldn’t be required to go under 13 minutes. Once a week, add in a few short bursts to your run. Run easy to warm your body up, then go hard for 100-200 meters followed by going easy for about the same distance. Alternate until you have done around 4-10 hard portions, starting close to 4 and working up as far as you want to go, and then run easy to cool down. On the other days, run truly easy. You shouldn’t be running as hard as you can more than once a week, even once a week might be too frequent for some.

    There is a lot more you can do if you want to continue progressing but something as simple as this should lead to getting to where you state your goal is.

  • #14420

    Ed 1
    Member

    You might want Ryan’s opinion on this but you could also try some sprints after your runs. Once you have cooled down get to a grassy area or other very soft surface. Then eye up a distance of about 100 yards. Start out running building your speed over the distance to your top speed and then try a for a little more. Walk back to your start point and repeat. Do this several times. This may help to train whatever fast twitch muscles you have in your legs. Don’t do this on your all out days. Do this once a week and build it slowly up to three times a week. Good luck keep us all posted on your progress.

  • #14421

    randys
    Participant

    The change to the course route did teach me something about track construction.

    The course was layed out so that 600m were run on the Mitchell field track. This is the same venue where the Good Will Games were in the late 90’s.

    Until then the only track I had ever run on is at the local high school; which appears to be made of asphalt.

    The track at Mitchell field was entirely different. It felt almost ‘sponge like’. Giving but not mushy. It was a surface that I missed the moment we stepped off it. It felt like the track was adding spring to my strides.

    I never knew that ‘professional’ tracks were constructed in this way. I assumed they all were basically asphalt; perhaps with varying degrees of hardness. This surface felt more like rough textured rubber. If I hadn’t been in the middle of a race I would have paused to check it out more closely.

    Ryan, After every race I say to myself that next time I will just line up like everyone else, but by doing that I only become part of the problem. Thus far I have resisted that urge. Your idea about lining up based on expected finish position makes a lot of sense since the signs seem almost universally ignored.

    Randy

  • #14422

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    RandyS wrote:
    The track at Mitchell field was entirely different. It felt almost ‘sponge like’. Giving but not mushy. It was a surface that I missed the moment we stepped off it. It felt like the track was adding spring to my strides.

    I never knew that ‘professional’ tracks were constructed in this way. I assumed they all were basically asphalt; perhaps with varying degrees of hardness. This surface felt more like rough textured rubber. If I hadn’t been in the middle of a race I would have paused to check it out more closely.

    This is how most tracks are made these days. Off the top of my head, I can’t even remember the last track I ran on that was asphalt. It would have to be back in high school and the asphalt tracks were going away at that level even 10 years ago. It is basically rubber pellets, which give a more forgiving surface and enable the use of spikes.

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