2006’s gone, what’s on tap for 2007?

Welcome! Forums Running Forum 2006’s gone, what’s on tap for 2007?

This topic contains 44 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by  Peter 11 years, 10 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #5900

    Peter
    Member

    I know nobody wants to be put on the spot, but if you choose to do so, tell us a bit about your past year, and what you want to accomplish this year.

    As for me, 2006 was a year I just never got going. After my best running year as an adult in '05, last year started w/ health issues, was further stalled w/ more medical injuries, and after I was healthy, I just couldn't get my weekly numbers to go up beyond 35 mpw or so. So my 1400 or so miles run this last year is a bit disappointing, but my November and December was actually pretty good, the best two months I had since March and April, and I should surpass last January's mileage by Sunday.

    So for 2007, I want to get out there 6 days every week, build my base up beyond the 5-6 mile runs I've been doing, and put in some really solid training. In order to do so, I need some goals, and the 1st one is to run the Sytennde Mai (20 mile race) in May at a pace that betters my marathon PR pace (6:50), and then focus on getting a sub 37 minute 10K during the summer and a 1:24 or better 1/2 marathon this fall, along with helping the Hillrunner team at Al's Run and Jingle Bell, if we can get enough folks to run. If all goes well, I'll look at signing up for a fall marathon, but it's not definite. I know that at 43+ years old, I need to work hard to achieve these goals, but they're certainly reachable. 

    ok, how's about you?

  • #22328

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Hmm, I guess I'll put myself on the spot.

    2006 definitely was not what I was expecting 365 days ago. Much like you, Peter, I just never got going with my goals. After going up and down more than a roller coaster in my attempt to get some base training going, I decided early in the year that I needed a break. I took an extended break, then got back into building my base too late for a serious fall marathon attempt so I thought I'd try my hand at some shorter races. I started the year kind of weak but not bad all things considered on the 4th of July, followed that up with a couple of pretty solid races later in July, had a very solid run at a “5k” that was short due to the lead bikes taking the leaders off the course, did pretty well at my school's alumni meet, then tanked at Al's Run, the goal race. Fortunately, because I wasn't focusing on a marathon, I was running enough races before and after that a bomb in the goal race didn't make the whole year a waste. After Al's Run, I had a good run and a great learning experience at my first ever trail race and followed that up with a solid run at a 5k a couple of weeks later. To finish off the year, I (finally) put together a good run at Jingle Bell.

    All told, it was a good year. I had one really bad race and no races that I would consider all-time bests but a handful of very good races. For what it's worth, I finished “in the money” (taking home some prize) at all but two races, the alumni meet which doesn't give prizes and Al's Run where the wheels fell off. I also finished in the top 5 in seven of my nine races (5, 3, 3, 5, 2, 1, 4). Not too bad for my final year in the 20-29 age group.

    As for 2007, I'm still not feeling the motivation to go after a marathon and, with how I treat the marathon, I simply can't bring myself to do one unless I'm really fired up for it. If things change, maybe I'll shoot for a fall marathon. Otherwise, I've been considering doing the trail series that Anne and jtpaten did last year and I'm considering my options at other races of the half marathon distance and shorter. Right now, I just want to establish some consistency with my base training and prepare for an assault on the 30-39 age group. There's a race two days after my birthday that's tempting. Otherwise, maybe I'll start out my 4th decade on this planet the same way I started out my 3rd decade here, racing on the indoor track. The only races that I'm sure I'll be doing will be the alumni meet, Al's Run, and Jingle Bell. Hopefully, there will be plenty of familiar faces at Al's Run and Jingle Bell so we can defend one title and work on reclaiming the other.

  • #22329

    sfrunnerdude
    Member

    2006 was an up and down year.  The first 6 months were marked by a complete lack of motivation for any sort of racing.  I ran alot that first half though it was unstructured and unplanned.  That first 6 months was sort of a base phase, though I did too many short doubles to get the benefits one really wants from the base work.  I did run races a couple times during that period, notably a 1/2 in Feb where I ran the exact same pace as the marathon I did 2 months before.  A 5k in March where I set a PR (18:02) and a mountain trail run where I placed 3rd after leading for the first 7.5 out of 9 miles.  In May I had a trail race where for some unknown reason I couldn't run faster than 7:00/mile and finished in June with a small 5k PR of 17:55.

    The 2nd half of the year I went to Europe and ran a 1/2 in my company's “olypmics” and completely bombed it by running a PW in 95 degree high humidity conditions and taking an IV after.  After my time over there I came back to the US and set a huge PR unexpectedly in the 10k lowering my time from 38:17 to 37:08 capping off a 92 mile full marathon training week.  In October on an easier course I again raced a 10k in exactly 37:08 which was maddening as I thought I was in 36:30 shape.  A week later I ran a practice 1/2 to perfection with 5 miles at MP, 5 a hair faster, and all out the last 5k.  I set my sights on a 2:45 marathon and finished in 2:47:04 with a 19 second negative split.  I ran the perfect race for the course and ran my fastest for the day, which I am pleased with.

    For 2007 I have very high motivation for some reason and plan on 10 weeks of winter base work followed by a focus on 5 and 10k's from mid March through May.  From there, I am unsure on what I'll do.  I'd like to get as close to 35 minutes for a 10k as possible this spring.

  • #22330

    GTF
    Member

    A day has yet to pass that would demarcate either a beginning or an end to anything significant; the first of January is simply a continuation of what continues to be just as much as December 31st was.  Hopefully good fortune will follow in the coming days, but if not it will be no noteworthy tragedy.  Either way, it will continue to be interesting to see. 8)

  • #22331

    Layne
    Member

    It's so interesting the juxtaposition of one runner's goals vs another's. Ryan can't get motivated for a marathon and that's ALL I can think about. I'm hesitant to share my goals.
    In 14 years of running there have been so many failures and maybe 3 successes; breaking 4hrs for the marathon, qualifying for Boston, and my PR of 3:12. I'll be 55 this year and realize that time is running out to accomplish my 2 dreams. With that in mind, for 2007 I've adopted  the new mantra: if you do what you've always done you get what you've always got. It's time to adopt new methods knowing I can't do any worse than I've already done. I've put all else on hold, including Comrades, to focus on 2 marathons this year. I am returning to Boston in an attempt to erase two previously (very) disappointing times. In that regard I am trying to take every advantage of the mile winter we've had; long runs, longer runs, and two-a-day runs when possible. My second goal is the most sacred. Once before it's too late I would like to break 3 hrs. There I've said it, a secret just three other people knew. My target race is LFM 2007. I started counting the days after this past years completion. It'll be my 10th LFM and first in the 55-59 AG. Without talking out my A$$, I'm hoping to travel here (www.lornah.com) this summer to complete my training. Whether all this will come to fruition remains to be seen, but if I don't make it, I at least want to believe I did things differently and gave it my best shot.

  • #22332

    Aaron
    Member

    2006 started off slow recovering from some issues with my IT band and sesamoiditis.  I was starting to run well in spring with a 10K PR and then I ended up straining my right quad sliding into home during a softball game.  After close to a month off I geared up for Fall and managed a PR in the 5K and 15K.  I managed to run a similar time that I qualified for State in 1991.  Not bad for a 32 year old ex-smoker.  I finished the season with my debut 1/2 marathon and ended up winning the Lake Mills Tyranena Half Barrel Run.  I was not happy with my time but I learned alot about ruinning that distance and some things I could do in my training that would lead to improved results.

    So.. for 2007, my goals are to stay healthy, run my debut marathon (probably Grandma's), qualify for Boston, and PR in the 5K, 10K, and 1/2 marathon all over again.  This year my base will be bigger and better than ever so I am looking forward to a good running year. 

  • #22333

    cameron
    Member

    I managed to roll 2000 miles in 2006 as well completing marathon #16 and #17 and ultra #5.  I PR'd in the marathon (3:08:05) and 50K (4:10:36) distances and flirted with my PR's in the 15K and 20K.

    Goals for 2007…ordered from most realistic to most challenging…

    1. Crush my Course Record at Boston (3:24:53)
    2. Finish my first 100K at the Kettle 100 in June
    3. sub4 50K at the Chicago Lakefront 50K in November
    4. sub3 marathon (Boston or more realistically at Lakefront in October)

    Road Runner in Red…it's interesting to hear you talk about running out of time for a sub3 at age 55.  i'm closing in on 35 this summer and am feeling the clock ticking for my chances!  (someday i'd like to do Comrades.)

  • #22334

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    It's so interesting the juxtaposition of one runner's goals vs another's. Ryan can't get motivated for a marathon and that's ALL I can think about.

    Indeed. More evidence that running is many different things for many different people. I actually wouldn't say I can't get motivated for a marathon, I just can't get motivated for the 13 runs a week/20 miles a day type training I consider necessary to make the commitment of doing a marathon worthwhile. I kind of hope I can get there by early spring so I can take a shot at a fall marathon but, if not, I'll enjoy another year of shorter races.

    I'm hesitant to share my goals.
    In 14 years of running there have been so many failures and maybe 3 successes…

    I hope you don't look at that as a failure. If so, then I'm right along with you. Personally, when I look at all the goals I've fallen short of, I just remind myself that, if I set “realistic” goals all the time, I never would have accomplished nearly as much as I have. There's that old saying that goes something like “Aim for the stars. Even if you fall short, you will still hit the moon.” I've put plenty of craters on the moon that would not be there if I was only aiming for the moon.

  • #22335

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Cameron, if the clock is ticking for you yet it's still about 3am. While I wouldn't suggest wasting time, you still do have plenty of time to chase that sub-3. I only see two things keeping you from getting there: focus and long term consistency.

  • #22336

    r-at-work
    Member

    for me 2006 was a good year, didn't start out that way as I had my first DNF in Tampa in February (stood in the rain for half and hour, by mile sixteen everything cramped)… but I put in 125 more miles than last year and the Philly marathon was good enough to allow me to send off my money to Boston for 2007…

    my older son went off to college this fall, younger one started HS and ran XC with a four minute improvement from his first meet to the last (same course), most improved runner on his team… okay, so he started out as the slowest guy, but at the award night the coach said he had a “great attitude and never gave up”…

    so I finished up the year making hotel & train reservations and got a lecture from my kids & my husband about how I can't give up running now that I've met my goal… not likely… as long as the body holds out I'll be thinking about 'the next one' and lacing up my shoes…

    hope everyone has a great year…
    -Rita

  • #22337

    Anne
    Member

    2006 was my best year of running for several reasons: renewed dedication & commitment, the addition of new elements to training mainly speedwork and hills, focusing on shorter distances rather then just the marathon, experiencing the world of trail racing.

    I set PR's in every distance with the exception of Grandma's Slogfest, took first in my age group in every race I ran except for Grandma's & Whistlestop. Even managed a first overall and a second overall. FINALLY ran a race where I didn't start out too fast. 
    I'm very motivated right now & have clear goals on what I want to accomplish in 2007. Right now training for Boston is first & foremost, it may be my last marathon & I want to do it right. After that I plan to focus on the 1/2 marathon distance & see what I can do. I plan to race several 1/2's, 5 & 10K's this year, hopefully continue to PR.

  • #22338

    cameron
    Member

    Cameron, if the clock is ticking for you yet it's still about 3am. While I wouldn't suggest wasting time, you still do have plenty of time to chase that sub-3. I only see two things keeping you from getting there: focus and long term consistency.

    yep…i agree with you.  focus is tough especially with having a wife and 3 kids plus a wandering eye towards ultramarathons.  as far as consistency, i've run 2000, ~1700 and ~2200 miles for each of the last 3 years respectively.  i think that annual amount needs to move higher to give me a better shot at success in general.

    regardless, i'm still out there grinding away.  most of my high school and college teammates have hung up the spikes long ago.  😉

  • #22339

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Cameron, no doubt it's hard. Harder than at this point I have had to experience. Just stating what is needed to accomplish the goal. The only question left is how important the goal is to you in relation to everything else.

    Your yearly consistency is impressive but how about your monthly consistency? I have a hunch your intra-year consistency could be improved upon and result in some pretty impressive improvements.

    No doubt your well beyond your peers, as are most of us here. Of course, most of us are more interested in improving our standing than remaining ahead of the former All-American who is now carrying an extra 30 pounds.

    Not trying to be cruel or anything. Just trying to offer some input on where you are in relation to your goal. If you think your clock is ticking, then nearly everyone's clock is ticking.

  • #22340

    Zeke
    Member

    i think that annual amount needs to move higher to give me a better shot at success in general.

    I couldn't agree more.  You always talk about mileage for the 12 weeks leading up to the race, but it takes more than that to run up to your potential.  Frankly, I'm surprised you've run 3:08 on about 2,000 mpy.

  • #22341

    randys
    Participant

    For me 2006's high point was my 3:19 marathon PB last May. I also maintained good training consistancy (took no days off in 06); hitting nearly 4000 miles for the 2nd year in a row.

    The bad news for 06 is only surfacing now! With 17 weeks until my next marathon I find I've lost speed. My endurance is good; and 80-90 mile weeks are not a problem; but I can't hit my old training paces especially on long runs and progression workouts (at least not at the old perceived effort levels).

    My marathon pace from last year feels really tough now; and that pace is well off what I need to reach my 07 goal of a 3:14 marathon in May.

    Well, if I don't get faster in 07 at least I can look forward to entering the 50-54 age group next year. I can start setting new AG PB's in 08.

    Randy

  • #22342

    cameron
    Member

    Your yearly consistency is impressive but how about your monthly consistency?

    I just updated my monthly totals for the Million Mile Ultra.  You can see a list going back to Jan 97 at…

    http://ice.he.net/cgi-bin/suid/~mmahoney/mm.pl?name=Gerald+Cameron

    It looks like I'm currently in 37th place…trailing 28th place Dave Dehart (AKA Double) by about 3000 miles.

    http://ice.he.net/cgi-bin/suid/~mmahoney/mm.pl?within=3

    My annual mileage totals since 2000 are…

    2006 – 2000.0
    2005 – 1598.4
    2004 – 2201.9
    2003 – 1685.3
    2002 – 1959.6
    2001 – 1933.8
    2000 – 1750

    zeke – i've actually got two 3:08's [2006 & 2001] and a 3:09 [2004] to my credit…on minimal miles

  • #22343

    cameron
    Member

    (took no days off in 06)

    Randy – Why no days off?

    I can't hit my old training paces especially on long runs and progression workouts

    Wouldn't a day off once every two weeks (or so) help give you a spring in your step?

    In 2006, I had 267 days “on” and 98 days “off”…on average slightly under 2 days off per week.  (and only ran half the miles you did)

  • #22344

    GTF
    Member

    Got recovery weeks?

  • #22345

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Let me just jump on board the “no days off?” train, also. It seems very plausible that the “no days off” may be a factor in the lack of sharpness you're feeling. Did you build any recovery of any kind in your schedule? Did you do any tempo/progression/fartlek/strides type workouts any time recently? If you run the same thing every week and every month, eventually you're going to get comfortable with that but have trouble doing anything different (in this case, anything fast).

  • #22346

    cameron
    Member

    Got recovery weeks?

    i took a week off at least twice last year.  once after my spring marathon and another after my fall 50K.

  • #22347

    GTF
    Member

    As per the subject line, that post was directed to the poster who indicated a complete lack of days off.  To clarify, recovery weeks are regularly scheduled (every 2-4 weeks) weeks of reduced volume to enhance recovery from the previous 2-4 weeks of training, to ensure that the benefits of the training are assimilated.  These are not the same as annual or semi-annual planned breaks.

  • #22348

    randys
    Participant

    My problem with speed is less an issue of legs and more an issue of lungs. When running quicker than an easy/aerobic pace my breathing becomes labored (with wheezing); and my heart rate climbs rapidly. I think the return of colder weather has caused my asthma symptoms to return.

    I started running 5 years ago to improve my health and avoid being dependant on long-term medication. At the time I was taking blood pressure, cholestoral and several asthma medicatations. Running let me overcome the need for those medications; and my asthma symptoms (which had been a part of daily activities; like simply walking up stairs) diminished to the point where they appeared only on fast runs.

    After 8 months of running without AdVair (or any medication) I thought I had overcome it. Now it looks like I need to renew that perscription. Ironic; I started running to avoid taking medication, now I need it to run better!

    Until I'm back on AdVair I'll change venues for the faster workouts. On my treadmill (in warm, moist air) the symptoms are greatly diminished. I'm worse in cold, dry air and during the height of the pollen season (probably related to alergies).

    Randy

  • #22349

    Peter
    Member

    Randy, you still don't address the question of why you feel the need to run every single day. Without ragging to much on you, Ryan, Cameron and myself tend to agree that taking days off or having a recovery period scheduled can benefit you mas much if not more than running every single day. Ryan's point about becoming stale from little or no variation in your workouts is a good point. If you want to take a real shot at 3:14, then you ought to focus on MP runs @ 7:20-7:25 pace, tempo runs @ 6:50 pace, and repeats or intervals @ 5K race pace (6:30?).

    Please take this as constructive criticism. I am pretty much in awe with what you've done over the 5 years you've been running, and I wish I would put in the miles you are doing. Keep a positive outlook, and good luck with the training.

  • #22350

    Zeke
    Member

    Randy, you still don't address the question of why you feel the need to run every single day…If you want to take a real shot at 3:14, then you ought to focus on MP runs @ 7:20-7:25 pace, tempo runs @ 6:50 pace, and repeats or intervals @ 5K race pace (6:30?).

    We have this same “conversation” once or twice a year, don't we?  Don't forget the part about trying different race distances – other than just marathons.

  • #22351

    Bart
    Member

    I'm also looking to go sub-3 in 2007.  I'm planning to run the Rock 'n Roll Marathon in June and then a second marathon in the fall, probably either Bizz Johnson or CIM.  I'd also like to break 1:25:00 for the half and 19 minutes for the 5k, but sub-3 is the primary focus for this year.

    In 2006, I ran 3:06:39 in the rain at the Napa Valley Marathon, set a half marathon PR (1:26:46) and I also finally broke 40 minutes for the 10k (39:40).

    Bart

  • #22352

    GTF
    Member

    My problem with speed is less an issue of legs and more an issue of lungs.

    So that would excuse disregarding the needs of the m-s system?

  • #22353

    Run
    Member

    Im a little late posting my 2006 miles, but better late than never.

    I got 2029 miles in, I think thats about 300 more than 05.  But more importantly, I had no running related injuries.  I did have brain surgery in July, and am currently undergoing chemotherapy, but Ive been really lucky in regards to this whole ordeal.  Im actually running PR's!  I ran a 5 miler at the end of December in 29:27. 

    Currently Im gearing up for a spring Half in NJ as part of an effort to raise money for the National Brain Tumor Foundation.  At the moment I thinking I might be able to come in the top 10.  I just have to stay healthy and keep my training in line.  Well, thanks for reading, and if you want to read more about my story, check out my website.  You can also donate to the NBTF there. 

    http://www.runtimrun.com

    TIM

  • #22354

    sueruns
    Member

    let's see if I can be as vague as GTF  😀

    2006:  “it was the best of times, it was the worst of times”    Charles Dickens

  • #22355

    GTF
    Member

    Which part was lost on you?

  • #22356

    sueruns
    Member

    maybe all of it.  😀  I can only tell that you maybe have something coming up soon, but you will conitnue to train in 2007 very much like 2006.  I don't know, I was thinking you were avoiding spilling what your number goals are…I have the same vagueness  :-X

  • #22357

    GTF
    Member

    Admittedly, I have made little secret that I find little sense in broadcasting specific goals.  I find also little sense in “number goals” so there is nothing to “spill”.  To quote another Brit (you may know who): “Life is what happens while you are busy making plans.”

  • #22358

    Run
    Member

    John Lennon

  • #22359

    Anne
    Member

    My post from yesterday afternoon is gone.  ???

    GTF, why do you feel it makes no sense to state (“broadcast”)  specific goals?

    In what I've read on the subject both sports psychs & coaches say that letting others know your specific goals is one of the steps in the process of goal setting.
    Furthers the commitment, drives the motivation if the others know what you're working towards.
    I find it's beneficial to me to let someone else know what's keeping me going out there day after day after day….

    Also, because others here share the same interest, I like to know what they are working towards whether it's to knock 5 seconds off a PR or race a new distance. Part of a running forum environment.

  • #22360

    sueruns
    Member

    my post disappeared also  ???

    I didn't mean to put GTF on the spot,  and I apologize if I did so.  I thought maybe we had something in common (never mentioning times, ect.).  I'm very reluctant to publicize my goals.  I do believe that it's my own lack of confidence, somewhat.  I always set the bar pretty high and in the past when I've confided in running acquaintances, they've given me grief and even questioned by ability to get there.

    my quote for 2007:

    If you don't know where you’re going, you'll probably not wind up there.”

    ~ Forrest Gump

    ;D

  • #22361

    Anne
    Member

    Something tells me GTF rarely feels put on the spot.  😉

    Establishing goals is tricky business.  To make them challenging yet obtainable. For me they are like stairs, achieve one then go on to the next even though it may take a year or two to get there.

    The mental aspect of running has always been my biggest weakness & I'll use whatever motivational tools to improve. I've found over the years by verbalizing my goals to others I'm more driven to achieve them.

    I haven't run into the naysayers that you have Sue, I suppose if I met with the same reactions I'd be less apt to let them know my plans.

    So if you feel you set the bar too high maybe you come up with some more reasonable goals. The self confidence builds as you cross off another goal that's been met but if you continually find yourself falling short then I can see where the doubts would set in.

    You are an extremely talented runner Sue, perhaps your some of your goals could focus on the self confidence aspect.

    Believing in yourself is another topic altogether.

  • #22362

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    My post from yesterday afternoon is gone.  ???

    my post disappeared also  ???

    Indeed, some posts were lost due to a server change this week and technicalities of the Internet. Sorry about that. Explanation here.

    As for goal setting, the way I see it, it can go both ways. Sometimes, publicly stating goals can be a big motivator. It can help you stay true to your goals because you know others are aware of what you wanted to accomplish. On the other hand, you can set yourself up. Sometimes, goals have to change and it's hard to change them once they are known publicly. Also, some people might see a person's aggressive goal and think the person is getting cocky or start giving the person a rough time about their goals.

    Personally, I used to always be 100% open. Goals, training, everything was an open book. After being attacked left and right if I fell even seconds short of a goal or if I had to adjust my goals due to factors out of my control and being attacked left and right about my training, I appreciate the value of silence. Sometimes, it really is better to keep things to yourself and be very selective about what you share publicly.

  • #22363

    Anne
    Member

    I've never experienced what you & Sue have when falling  short of  goals. If I had then as I said in my reply to Sue I'd probably keep my goals to myself.

    I've gotten advice & the “you'll get it next time” but have never had anyone be critical of my aspirations.

    Maybe it has something to do with the level of runner you are. Either that or I confide in nicer people then you. 😉

  • #22364

    GTF
    Member

    My post from yesterday afternoon is gone.  ???

    GTF, why do you feel it makes no sense to state (“broadcast”)  specific goals?

    Perhaps it was misunderstood, “broadcast” means to publicly state.  It is perfectly fine to formulate goals and share them with appropriate personal confidants, I often will do so.  Broadcasting goals in a public setting to include those who may not necessarily have your best interests in mind or whose input may be inappropriate seems to be quite different from that. 

    In what I've read on the subject both sports psychs & coaches say that letting others know your specific goals is one of the steps in the process of goal setting.

    No coach of mine ever suggested or encouraged the like. 

    Furthers the commitment, drives the motivation if the others know what you're working towards.

    If a goal is meaningful to me in an activity that I genuinely enjoy, then motivation and commitment will already be more than sufficient and likely cannot be improved via external sources. 

    I find it's beneficial to me to let someone else know what's keeping me going out there day after day after day….

    Perhaps in terms of attaining affirmation and acceptance.  In observing several different running-focussed fora over the years, it seems that most who spend their time talking about their own running significantly tend towards underachieving and failing to reach stated performance goals.  It might be mere coincidence, but clearly the public broadcasting had zero positive effect in reaching goals for multitudes of others.

    Also, because others here share the same interest, I like to know what they are working towards whether it's to knock 5 seconds off a PR or race a new distance. Part of a running forum environment.

    Others may make that out of it, the only real use I find in it is the basic premise of information exchange.  I do confess to enjoying noting improvement (via end results) in others.

  • #22365

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    In the end, to each his or her own I guess. Some people respond well to publicly stating goals, others don't. I've seen the positives and negatives of each, so I appreciate both points of view. The only thing I'd say is, if you are publicly stating your goals, especially online, realize that anyone can read them. Possibly, as GTF pointed out, including people who do not have your best interests in mind.

  • #22366

    sueruns
    Member

    In the end, to each his or her own I guess. Some people respond well to publicly stating goals, others don't. I've seen the positives and negatives of each, so I appreciate both points of view. The only thing I'd say is, if you are publicly stating your goals, especially online, realize that anyone can read them. Possibly, as GTF pointed out, including people who do not have your best interests in mind.

    good point.  I believe what Anne says that is good to be able to “say it”.  But probably safest if I say it to myself.  While I find this website a very safe atmosphere, it is public.  People are naturally A”curious”.  I once had a person email me with information on a race I ran when I resided in a different state, with the comment “I had to see if you were the real deal” attached :-[

  • #22367

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Sue, that is a tough situation. It's really amazing and could be considered scary how much information is out there on us just in online race results.

    I would even say it's good to be able to “say it” to trusted confidants. There are just some risks of doing so in a too public place. I don't think some people realize how many people actually visit this site anonymously (I think it's a great thing they can visit and read good advice but all it takes is a tiny percentage of ill intentioned people and you could have one or two here) and I'm not even going to try to claim that it's a high traffic site. I don't want to scare anyone away from this site or others, including more busy ones, but it is a fact of life we should be aware of.

  • #22368

    Anne
    Member

    GTF, what can I say, you & I are very different breeds of runners.

    I disagree with with much of what you say, you seem to see things in black & white, there is never any gray with you.

    I won't take the time to respond because I truly and somewhat sadly feel that it would be a waste of my time.

  • #22369

    GTF
    Member

    GTF, what can I say, you & I are very different breeds of runners.

    Perhaps so, though I am not as certain of it.

    I disagree with with much of what you say, you seem to see things in black & white, there is never any gray with you.

    I have no problem stating that this is an incorrect perception.

    I won't take the time to respond because I truly and somewhat sadly feel that it would be a waste of my time.

    Too late.  What is sad?  This is about running, which is fun for me.  8)

  • #22370

    Wilson
    Member

    I know nobody wants to be put on the spot, but if you choose to do so, tell us a bit about your past year, and what you want to accomplish this year.

    ok, how's about you?

    I haven't checked in here for quite some time, but this thread appears to have drifted (or not) from its original intent.

    Running-wise, 2006 was intense, fun, and aerobically satisfying, but it ended with a pretty big crash. I cross country ski for 6 mo of the year and didn't get started with running consistently until May. Best races of the year were a 35:32 10k, 4:54 mile, 19:30 1/2, and an quantifiably immeasurable 5k hill climb where I raced against a bunch of college athletes. Considering advancing age, now approaching 50, it barely could have gone better. However, I crashed at my peak/goal race, the Equinox Marathon, by catching a cold a few days before and then bonking at the end and had to try to fight off a former 29 min 10k runner over the last mile for a coveted 5th place plate. He outkicked me over the final 100 m, and that ended my running season. Was sick off an on for the next six weeks.

    However, have bounced back and have enjoyed a decent ski season so far, and will do three 50ks (including one you midwesteners may have heard about, the Birkebeiner) in the next six weeks. After that I'll cycle back into running, but have no plans for a marathon. Would like to really focus on 1 mile to 10k for the summer, and then just do mid-distance trail races (mostly about 15k to 13 miles) into the fall.

  • #22371

    jtpaten
    Member

    I'm still formulating my goals but wanted to weigh in on this aging thread nevertheless.

    This year I'll look to shave from my marathon PR the 65 seconds I need to get to Boston. Haven't picked a qualifying race yet, but it will likely be in the fall.

    I'm already registered to run the Grand Island Trail Marathon and the Keweenaw Trail Running Festival and my goals are to break 3:30 at the former and finish in the top 10-15 at the latter.

    In fact, I'd like to stick to trail running (and mountain biking) as much as possible this year. I may even look for an off-road tri, but one that substitutes the swimming with paddling.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.