A mileage building idea…

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This topic contains 2 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  JCWrs 13 years, 12 months ago.

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  • #2030

    JCWrs
    Member

    OK, I came up with this looking over my running log last night and I wanted to make sure that it sounded ok to some more experienced runners. My log is pretty simple, it just contains the distance of each day and the total for the week (if I do a workout and I need to track my progress I just note it out to the side). I was averaging my /week last night and then my 10 week averages as well because, well, I’m a geek like that.

    It was looking at my 10 week averages that I had a thought. Since each week that you add in kicks one week out the back of the 10 week average, I had the idea of trying to build mileage by making sure each of these “new” weeks were higher then the one getting dumped off the back, thus always increasing my 10 week average. My thinking is that since I have cut-back weeks and other variations within that 10 weeks, it will keep me from trying to always set a new mileage record and be a safer way to build mileage. What do you all think? Obviously there may be circumstances such as races that I want to taper for or even if I just don’t feel good on a certain week that could keep me from making my goal, but does that idea at least sound like something worth shooting for? It doesn’t put limits on my mileage, but at the same time it will keep what I’m shooting at from being my all-time weekly high every week (and yeah, I get stuck on that a lot). Let me know what you think. As always, thanks!

  • #16794

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    My first impression is that this seems better than the alternative you offer of always trying to increase upon the previous week. In that way, it seems good.

    Then, I took a moment to realize what’s going on. You know, you don’t always need to be building. There may be times you need to level off and there may be other times, planned or unplanned, where you need to cut back a bit. While you would hopefully see an upward trend over the course of 10 weeks, trying to always improve on what you did 10 weeks ago could to a lesser extent carry the same risks as trying to always improve on what you did last week.

    I guess I’m still just a fan of doing as much as your body and your chosen priorities allow and letting the numbers take care of themselves.

  • #16894

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    My first impression is that this seems better than the alternative you offer of always trying to increase upon the previous week. In that way, it seems good.

    Then, I took a moment to realize what’s going on. You know, you don’t always need to be building. There may be times you need to level off and there may be other times, planned or unplanned, where you need to cut back a bit. While you would hopefully see an upward trend over the course of 10 weeks, trying to always improve on what you did 10 weeks ago could to a lesser extent carry the same risks as trying to always improve on what you did last week.

    I guess I’m still just a fan of doing as much as your body and your chosen priorities allow and letting the numbers take care of themselves.

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