Fall and winter gear. What to wear?

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  snowski12000 12 years ago.

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  • #5667

    snowski12000
    Member

    I know many of you run in areas where it rains all fall and have the cold and snow all winter. In the past I've skipped my runs on days that it rains and just waited it out for a day or so. Last winter I ran with so many layers on that at times I felt like a snowman. Can you folks please give me some suggestions on how to dress for the rain and also the cold weather. I've been wearing a thin nylon shell for my legs when the temp get below 45. In the rain I have no idea what to wear. Thanks, Ski.

  • #21840

    GTF
    Member

    GoreTex or a similar laminated fabric.  Breathable base layers, insulative outer layers.  Better to be a little too warm than a little too cold. 

  • #21841

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    There are a lot of tech fabrics available now that can do a very good job of keeping you warm without having to pile on a ton of gear.

    GoreTex is probably the ultimate for handling the rain and I've heard is pretty good for the cold. I've been too cheap to buy it, so I work with other, more affordable fabrics.

    For the rain, what I do depends on the temp. The worst conditions for running at all as far as I'm concerned would be 35-40 and rain. For this, I usually wear a pair of lightweight Nike Dri-fit or adidas Climalite pants and a similar shirt with a Dri-fit windbreaker jacket, which helps keep me dry at least until I've warmed up. A pair of gloves and a fleece hat that would likely come off before the end would complete the gear.

    For the cold, it's mostly a combination of Nike and adidas tech fabrics (there happen to be Nike and adidas outlets not too far from my home so most of my gear that I don't buy online from ads through this site are obtained from those outlets at good discounts). Some pairs of heavier pants I have are usually good for me down to the 10-20 degree range, at which time I will add a pair of tights under them. I have some windpants for the severe cold. For the top, layering of tech fabrics for their wicking ability against my skin, cotton (yes, I'm still “old school” with the cotton) for insulation in the middle, and my Nike windbreaker if it's windy. A good fleece hat will usually suffice for me in all but the most severe conditions, in which case I might layer hats, and gloves of varying thickness depending on the temps finish it off.

    Of course, everyone has different needs. Some people need to really bundle up in the cold, others don't need much at all. It's a very individual thing. The key is to get the right materials, of which almost every manufacturer of sporting gear has an alternative. Look for wicking layers for against your skin and insulating layers outside of that.

  • #21842

    r-at-work
    Member

    Of course, everyone has different needs. Some people need to really bundle up in the cold, others don't need much at all. It's a very individual thing. The key is to get the right materials, of which almost every manufacturer of sporting gear has an alternative. Look for wicking layers for against your skin and insulating layers outside of that.

    besides wet & cold, I have a big variable on how I feel on a particular day… I'm weird, if I wake up and I'm chilled I bundle up in several layers, especially hat & gloves… my polar fleece running jacket is the best thing I've bought other than gloves… I'm still looking for the perfect earwarmers since the upper edges of my ears get cold when the rest of my head is fine (I may have had mild frostbite as a teen)…

    one thing I do when I am feeling extremely wimpy is to run from home and do a four mile loop and come home to change gear as needed, like lose the jacket when I'm warm, or change wet shoes & socks if it's raining… one 20 miler last year I changed all my outer gear three times(cold & rainy), but it got me through the miles and made for LOTS of laundry but since I do the laundry I didn't complain at all…

    I've also done 20 milers in rain & 85 degrees… joyously… but that's another topic…
    -Rita

  • #21843

    GTF
    Member

    I'm still looking for the perfect earwarmers

    http://www.180s.com/

  • #21844

    GTF
    Member

    There are a lot of tech fabrics available now that can do a very good job of keeping you warm without having to pile on a ton of gear.

    Indeed.  I believe I have worn up to four layers, though typically do not wear more than three, and have never felt like a “snowman” or significantly weighed down.  If one does it consistently, one will get used to it.

    GoreTex is probably the ultimate for handling the rain and I've heard is pretty good for the cold. I've been too cheap to buy it, so I work with other, more affordable fabrics.

    One can be cheap and still find it, if one knows where to look to find the bargains.  However, I have not found that it is frequently needed, though that may not be the case in the upper lowlands. 

    For the rain, what I do depends on the temp. The worst conditions for running at all as far as I'm concerned would be 35-40 and rain. For this, I usually wear a pair of lightweight Nike Dri-fit or adidas Climalite pants and a similar shirt with a Dri-fit windbreaker jacket, which helps keep me dry at least until I've warmed up. A pair of gloves and a fleece hat that would likely come off before the end would complete the gear.

    For the cold, it's mostly a combination of Nike and adidas tech fabrics (there happen to be Nike and adidas outlets not too far from my home so most of my gear that I don't buy online from ads through this site are obtained from those outlets at good discounts). Some pairs of heavier pants I have are usually good for me down to the 10-20 degree range, at which time I will add a pair of tights under them. I have some windpants for the severe cold. For the top, layering of tech fabrics for their wicking ability against my skin, cotton (yes, I'm still “old school” with the cotton) for insulation in the middle, and my Nike windbreaker if it's windy. A good fleece hat will usually suffice for me in all but the most severe conditions, in which case I might layer hats, and gloves of varying thickness depending on the temps finish it off.

    There are similar garments that can be found at discount stores like Target for even less than the major label gear.  Also, being smart and utilitarian is not the sole provice of the “old school”.  😉

  • #21845

    snowski12000
    Member

    Thanks to all for the input. This at least this gives me some ideas on what and where to look for, the needed clothing for the up coming months. Ski.

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