Forced to take a deep marathon taper; now what

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  r-at-work 9 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #12014

    randys
    Participant

    Ok, here's the deal; I'm a consistant, resonably high mileage runner (often going a year or two between a day off, mileage range of 50-80 a week, for the past 10 years). Last Friday I was doing an easy, recovery workout running on lightly traveled suburban roads. Usually I run down the crown of the road and move to the sides when cars approach.

    Some of these roads have a lot of potholes left from this winter. Anyway, a car was approaching and I was forced to move to the shoulder and into the path of a bunch of potholes. I tried to leap over one to avoid the puddle it contained but misjudged, caught my toe and twisted my leg. I had to walk home limping.

    I rested the leg for 2 days and tried an easy 8 Monday which felt ok (I went reallly easy on this run). Feeling optomistic I did 8 at marathon pace on Tuesday which felt ok on the run but the pain returned afterwards.

    I was still sore on Wed but tried to run real easy; after 3 miles the pain was clearly increasing so I called it a day . Yesterday was even worse and I turned for home after a mile. Today I didn't even try; figuring it's going to take at least several days without running to heal the strain.

    My problem; I'm registered to run the Long Island Marathon May 2nd. In the months leading to the injury I ran plenty of miles; for the past 16 weeks I did Sunday runs of 20-24 miles, 13 on Wed, 10 on Sat (at MP), with a mix of easy and hard workouts Mon, Tue, Thu and Fri.

    Now the two weeks leading to the race are a complete bust. I've never believed in long, deep tapers, preferring a modest reduction in volumn with a corresponding increase in intensity over the last 10 days.

    If the injury is healed by next Sunday how much impact will this huge, forced, “taper” have on my race plan? I'm an experienced marathoner; I've raced 12 in the past 10 years. I'm not new to the distance, but new to taking this much time off.

    Thanks,

    Randy

  • #29885

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Randy, sorry to hear about the bad luck.

    I wouldn't worry about this situation too much, though. As you know from your running experience, nothing you do between now and race day will improve your fitness on race day. You're going to be relying on the months and years of consistent training going into these final two weeks. Do what you have to in order to get to get to the start line healthy. Once you start running on race day, you have the experience to adjust as necessary. The one thing to keep in mind, your fitness will be fine.

    Personally, I don't think I'd even adjust my goals pre-race. I'd go into the race with the same goals but maybe just a bit more cautious approach early on, then see where things were taking me.

  • #29886

    Andrew A.
    Member

    Usually I run down the crown of the road and move to the sides when cars approach.

    This is what I do and is why I tend to prefer running on quiet neighborhood/country roads.

    Now the two weeks leading to the race are a complete bust. I've never believed in long, deep tapers, preferring a modest reduction in volumn with a corresponding increase in intensity over the last 10 days.  If the injury is healed by next Sunday how much impact will this huge, forced, “taper” have on my race plan? I'm an experienced marathoner; I've raced 12 in the past 10 years. I'm not new to the distance, but new to taking this much time off.

    What have you been doing for recovery other than rest?  At this point in the phase, all the m-s stuff is basically completed, so cross-training for similar duration and intensity to the planned runs should be enough to prevent peaking early.  Given the nature of the injury, pool running might be best though the elliptical trainer/nordicski/rowing machine could also work as ways to mix up the routine 2-3 times per week.  As long as you replicate the stress on your c-v system then you should be good to roll into your usual taper routine.  Does that make sense?

  • #29887

    r-at-work
    Member

    good advice from the running side… what about that injury? are you icing, taking ibuprophen and thinking about a massage? when I read 'twisted' it made me think that there might be multiple muscle groups involved… I would get a massage to be sure they were all balanced before hitting the road again (but I'm a massage kind of person)… good luck with the LI marathon, with your background this might end up a non-issue..
    -Rita

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