Good time to start hill repeats?

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  randys 13 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #2153

    randys
    Member

    Next week, 14 weeks out, I will add hill repeats to my schedule (Tue and Thur).

    I will do 4 weeks of hills, followed by 8 weeks of intervals, a 2 week taper and the race (Long Island Marathon, May 1st).

    Is this a reasonable amount of time for each phase?

    I’ve been doing aerobic mileage for a long time (with strides; and some up-tempo and mp running over past few weeks).

    The winter winds and extra layers of clothing are making me feel slug-like. I look forward to getting back to some anaerobic training.

    With each marathon I seem to do more base and less hills and intervals.

    Randy

  • #17372

    Bart
    Member

    Your schedule looks reasonable to me. Personally, I prefer to do one day of hill repeats or intervals and one day with a tempo run instead of two days or hills or intervals, but that’s just my personal choice.

    RandyS wrote:
    With each marathon I seem to do more base and less hills and intervals.

    Just out of curiosity are your marathon times getting faster despite less hills and intervals?

    Bart

  • #17373

    randys
    Member

    Bart,

    Yes, but probably due to many factors

    I am a 47 year old male who started running 3 years ago (after quitting a 27 year old smoking habit and getting off the couch for the first time since school ended).

    My marathon history goes as follows:

    May 2002: 4:28 – 45 mpw – Long Island

    Oct 2002: 3:40 – 50 mpw – Mystic

    May 2003: 3:37 – 55 mpw – Long Island

    Oct 2003: 3:38 – 60 mpw – Mystic

    May 2004: 3:29 – 65 mpw – Long Island

    Nov 2004: 3:29 – 65 mpw – Philly

    The May 02 race was only 4 months after I began running so it is not in line with the other times.

    I was sick at the second Mystic and had a non-running related injury before Philly so those time don’t track well either.

    Beyond that my race time continues to drop as I refine my training through learning and experience but most important of all is the weekly and annual milage.

    I ran the Philly race with no speed work because of the injury. On a tougher course I ran the same time as 6 months earlier. I did speed work for the earlier race so it goes to show longevity and mileage are the biggest factors.

    I run almost every day, year round, and on only that base (no hills or sharpening) could run within a several minutes of my time with the anaerobic training.

    I hope the 70 mpw I am averaging this time around will get me to a sub 3:20. That sounds like a big leap but I feel without the injury Philly could have been closer to 3:25. I ran it with the injury, off of base training, and felt comfortable running the 3:29.

    I will know where I stand in my quest to reach sub 3:00 in 14 weeks. I am a very patient and will take incremental improvements, a little every year.

    Randy

  • #17374

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    14 weeks seems reasonable to me. As for your improvements, while I’d be willing to bet the weekly mileage helped, don’t discount the importance of the cumulative effect of training. Years of base will improve your times even if you do the same training the whole time.

  • #17375

    Ed 1
    Member

    Ryan – that last comment is important for me to take to heart – patience is part of the game – I need to get that into my thick skull. A very well developed base is very important and the more that base is built the better performances can be as well.

  • #17376
    Ryan wrote:
    14 weeks seems reasonable to me. As for your improvements, while I’d be willing to bet the weekly mileage helped, don’t discount the importance of the cumulative effect of training. Years of base will improve your times even if you do the same training the whole time.

    I’d agree particularly as it pertains to marathons.

    Regarding hill repeats, I usually don’t do them because I do a fair amount of my general aerobic runs over hilly terrain. Since I’m training for Boston, I’m thinking I need a little extra.

    Currently in week 6 of the 18 week 70+ pfitz program and will be moving into the LT + Endurance phase next week. I’m thinking of doing a few hill workouts during this phase to strengthen my quads.

    A friend of mine also suggested finishing a few long runs on a downhill stretch of a couple miles. Do this at MP or better on tired legs.

  • #17377

    Zeke
    Member

    Regarding hill repeats, I usually don’t do them because I do a fair amount of my general aerobic runs over hilly terrain. Since I’m training for Boston, I’m thinking I need a little extra.

    Last year was the first time I really added hill repeats to my training and it really seemed to helped. Prior to that, I was like you, just run some aerobic hilly routes. I think you’ll find some specific hill repeat to be beneficial – especially if you’re doing Boston.

    A friend of mine also suggested finishing a few long runs on a downhill stretch of a couple miles. Do this at MP or better on tired legs.

    Be careful with that. ‘Doc’ used to post here about 2-3 years ago. He was training for Boston by running some hard downhills and he ended up with a stress fracture. If you can run them on a soft surface, that’d help.

  • #17378

    Agree Zeke, I’m willing to take the risk but probably wouldn’t if I were running a flat course. Fortunately, I live close by an area in New Jersey that has hilly terrain on dirt roads which should be ideal.

    Hopefully, it will help prepare my quads for the hammering I plan to give them from Boston College on.

  • #17379

    Zeke
    Member

    Hopefully, it will help prepare my quads for the hammering I plan to give them from Boston College on.

    Actually the quad pounding starts immediately as the first 4 or 5 miles are downhill. You just don’t feel it ’til BC.

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