Hills – my discovery

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This topic contains 14 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  rather-b-running 14 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #1527

    For 3 weeks now, I have set aside one of my running days as hill repeats. I run 1.5 warm up & cool down, with 1 mile of intense hill repeats.

    Prior to this schedule, I have suffered from minor aches and pains – hip, shins, knees, etc. . . Also, I felt like my endurance was slipping, as my long runs seemed to be getting more difficult.

    Ok, with all that said, I just wanted to voice praise for hill work. I feel so much stronger, and I wake up the day after my hr day, and I don’t have any pain – anywhere!! What a difference!! And ironic.

    I live in a city where hills are everywhere, so all my outdoor runs consist of several hills of various lengths & heights. But doing hill repeats each week, I feel this has helped me in more ways than one. I hope that it will eventually help to speed me up a bit. I hate doing intervals, but as soon as I feel strong enough, I’ll start alternating my hr w/ intervals.

    Thanks for listening!

  • #14681

    r-at-work
    Member

    I’m still waiting for the improvement to kick in… only have been doing the hill thing about three weeks, not enough time yet… but I have also been doing intervals once a week as well…the caoches tell me adaptation will be within the next two weeks…

    thanks for the positive results report… hopefully it’ll keep me from getting discouraged… just in case it takes me longer to adapt… but I’m not giving up…

    -Rita

  • #14682

    Rita,

    So you are doing hills and intervals both each week? I was told (& also read) that you shouldn’t do both in the same week. Alternate was the advice I received.

    But if that’s the case, then I’m sure your coach knows what’s best for you!

    I’m just convinced that the hill work is definitely worth the pain!!!

    😀

  • #14683

    Scattershot
    Member

    I used to live in Elkton, MD which was full of hills. My four mile run was flat for the first and last, but all up/downhill for the middle two; I’d run that same route everyday (depending on distance). I miss it! Salisbury is completely flat.

  • #14684

    You know, the hilly runs that I do on the other days don’t seem to add the strength that my hill repeats do. I don’t know why, but the repeats are what have made the difference for me. I can honestly say I enjoy doing them. 😮

  • #14685

    Scattershot
    Member

    Back when I was doing HMs and lifting at the same time, I noticed my squats went up after a month or two on the aforementioned hill, just from running it (no repeats or anything).

    Alas, the physics of running at 300+ pounds are *just* a little bit different. 😀

  • #14686

    Anonymous

    Run, I got the same thing. My pain is concentrated in my hip. This is the third time i’ve had this. The other two times, I tried to come back too soon dragging the injury out.

    This time, I sort of threw in the towel and resigned myself to 3 weeks off to put it behind me. It kind of stinks cause I’ll lose alot from my marathon training. I’ll be shooting to run a PR in the 10k and the LBI 18 mile in the fall.

    I’ve been focusing on strenghthening my core and working on flexibility.

  • #14687

    Rich
    Member

    I find that hill running massively has improved my running generally. But what do you mean specifically by “hill repeats”?

    Hmm shall I run this Friday evening, or tomorrow morning? Thinks……. 😕

  • #14688

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    There are several ways we can run hills and they all serve their own purposes, many times one feeding off of the other.

    Hill repeats: The ultimate hill workout and, according to many coaches and athletes including people like Lydiard and Eyestone, the ultimate strength training workout for distance runners. This is the most demanding hill workout but also most effective way to build strength you will find useful, whether racing on hills or on the flat. This is where your strength basis comes from.

    Hill fartleks: These can be just as intense and effective as hill repeats or much less intense and effective, depending on your course and how you run the fartlek. This can be a good way to build or maintain your strength and, for those who don’t like hill repeats, can be less monotonous while getting in the same type of workout if you can find the right route.

    Hilly routes: This is a great workout for initial strength building before hill repeats, a secondary strength workout while doing hill repeats, or maintaining strength after hill repeat phase is over. Simply getting up and down the hills on a course with a number of challenging hills, no matter how hard you push them, will do a lot to build and maintain your strength.

    Daily runs on hills: This is another maintenance workout or, for the runner who has done no running on hills yet, a way to introduce the runner to hills. It will not be as effective for strengthening as the above types of runs but you can hit a good hill or two every day without sacrificing your workouts and this will help maintain strength or gradually build into hill running for those who haven’t run on hills before.

    Also, it’s important to remember that hills are great for working on your form. I mentioned strengthening here but you could replace strength with form and strengthening with form work throughout this post and it would still hold true.

  • #14689

    Scattershot
    Member

    Strength is an extension of speed and vice versa; work on one and the other improves. This is why 270 pound linebackers in the NFL can run 4.5/40s while the 200 pound Defensive Backs run a 4.3/40. I don’t think anyone here is interested in what their 40 yard dash time is, but it’s something to consider for the kick at the end of a race.

    If you’re not doing hills or have no access to them (like myself… grumble), Squats are wonderful in that regard.

  • #14690

    Rich
    Member

    Well – couldn’t be bothered to run this morning becasue I had things to do, and after a busy week at work, I enjoyed a lazy long morning. Then The FA Cup Final on BBC1, and Manchester Utd appear to have won. Boo!!!

    @ Scattershot – So now it’s time for me to run up a big hill!!! 😆

    Rich

  • #14691

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    Scattershot wrote:
    I don’t think anyone here is interested in what their 40 yard dash time is, but it’s something to consider for the kick at the end of a race.

    Don’t forget that there is much more to a kick, though. According to Arthur Lydiard in Running the Lydiard Way:

    Peter Snell was basically the slowest runner in the 800-meter final at both the Rome and Tokyo Olympic Games. But he had the stamina to carry him through the heats and then sprint the last 100 meters of the finals faster than any of his rivals. By then they were too tired to use their superior speed. Snell was trained to be capable of running a fine marathon, but I doubt that his rivals could. This was the advantage that enabled him to succeed; it’s also the advantage you can give yourself.

    A lot of people think the kick is all about speed. I have been able to outkick people who have far superior speed because I was able to run the kick out of them while not running what kick I had out of myself.

  • #14692

    Scattershot
    Member

    Indeed, Ryan. Those same LBs and DBs aren’t running those 4.3/40s at the end of a game as they are towards the beginning (though with all the pads and whatnot they’re probably not running them on the field at all). Believe it or not, in my first HM I knew there was a big, long hill for the final half-mile of the race so I saved something for it. When I got to the base I saw no less than 15 people ahead of me, all walking or shuffling and looking completely spent. I knew I was going to finish near the end but I saw this as an opportunity to pick up a few places so I kicked it out (of course, my kick is probably a light jog for you and most others here :)). I passed all of them and finished 967/1003, where I would have been somewhere in the 980s if I had spent myself before that hill. That’s where running that same hilly route every day for the previous three months came in handy.

  • #14693

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    Scattershot wrote:
    Believe it or not, in my first HM I knew there was a big, long hill for the final half-mile of the race so I saved something for it. When I got to the base I saw no less than 15 people ahead of me, all walking or shuffling and looking completely spent. I knew I was going to finish near the end but I saw this as an opportunity to pick up a few places so I kicked it out (of course, my kick is probably a light jog for you and most others here :)). I passed all of them and finished 967/1003, where I would have been somewhere in the 980s if I had spent myself before that hill.

    Or you would have run faster over the rest of the course and finished 950th. 😉

  • #14694

    Schpeff
    Member
    Ryan wrote:
    A lot of people think the kick is all about speed. I have been able to outkick people who have far superior speed because I was able to run the kick out of them while not running what kick I had out of myself.

    Ah, the joys of running kickers into the ground. 😀 Too bad most of the time I do that I run the kick out of me too! 😉

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