London Marathon

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This topic contains 43 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  GTF 11 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #7220

    robrunrob
    Member

    Predictions on Ryan Hall's performance on Sunday?  I'm certainly pulling for him to do well, finish top 5 in sub 2:08, stay healthy, and collect his nice paycheck.  I see no problem with him running a top flight spring marathon in an Olympic year.  What do others think?  Should he save it for Bejing?  My thinking is the Olympic marathon will be too much of a tactical crapshoot, he has the right to “take the money and run” in London.  As a sidenote, what kind of money is he getting to show up in London? 10k, 25K, 50k,… way less?? I have no idea.

  • #24888

    tgrunner
    Member

    I'm certianly interested to see how Hall does and I do not think this will affect his Bejing performance. However, I'm actually more interested to see how the Kenyan situation plays out. I think it will be an exciting, extremely competitve marathon. Top 5 might be a tough pull for Hall in this one. Very curious to see how Wanjiru will do – since he is shooting for a 2:05  in the hopes of making the Kenyan team.

  • #24889

    GTF
    Member

    I agree with the second post(er), I am much more interested in the incredible talent with better records ahead of Hall than I am in the great white hope hype.  I do wish Hall well and think it would be great if he could buck the odds and get onto the podium, but said odds are still too long to be at all invested in the prospect.  Whatever time he runs and whatever amount of money he might 'earn' is secondary to even that.  Even with rabbits, London should hardly be any less tactically competitive than the Olympic marathon could be.  Hall arguably could have a better shot at the podium in Beijing than in London, with the generally less-competitive top end of the field of the former and the equalizer of far-less-than-ideal weather conditions and air quality (which usually play at least as much of a role as tactics do).  So, if his odds of performing his best in Beijing are curtailed by running London (and it is unclear whether or not that might hold true) then he should be skipping London.  Paydays should always be secondary (at best) to glory.

  • #24890

    WI MTP
    Member

    It is an iteresting thought – Hall looked like a stud at the OT, but it was a very slow start and he dictated the pace in the mid and late race.  At London there will be guys cranking from mile #1, their will be all sorts of strategic surges mid and late race.  Last year at London Hall was a player until near the end when he just didn't have enough to hang.

    This year he says he is faster and more fit.  I think he could go low 2:06 if he ran his own race, but this is London and he will be racing with the big dogs and not running his own pace.

    I still think he can crack 2:07, if it is a good weather day.  Finishing somewhere between 4-6th place.

    Its gonna be fun!

  • #24891

    Run
    Member

    Ryan Hall is still at the beginning of his career, just getting into the big leagues.  I think he will do really well on Sunday, but regardless of his time or place, he will gain what he needs most by competing in this race, experience.  From interviews Ive seen with him, he seems to realize that he still has a lot to learn.

  • #24892

    r-at-work
    Member

    I think he will do really well on Sunday, but regardless of his time or place, he will gain what he needs most by competing in this race, experience.  From interviews Ive seen with him, he seems to realize that he still has a lot to learn.

    I'm very interested in the Kenyans.. Wanjiru could really make it exciting… but indeed as important as time/winning/money/glory are in the 'long run', I think playing it smart and running ones own race, whatever that may mean is what Ryan has to keep in the front of his mind… as pitiful as my abilty and training is in comparison, even I have felt the pull those first few miles… steady on…
    Rita

  • #24893

    robrunrob
    Member

    Lel sprints to win in last 200 yards in 2:05:15
    Wanjuri, Goumri, Mutai, then….

    RYAN HALL 5th in 2:06:17!  What a race, and Ryan Hall… what a stud.

  • #24894

    Run
    Member

    Here's a good interview with Ryan after today's finish;

    https://web.archive.org/web/20080421103803/http://www.flocasts.org:80/flotrack/speakers.php?sid=78&vid=13179

    Definitely a great performance by the top 6, all under 2:07 😮

  • #24895

    tgrunner
    Member

    watched the marthon as well. Wow, Hall was more impressive than I had expected. Great race to watch overall – wanjiru?? Lel responding….its was exciting.

    If I didn't before, I now feel like Hall deserves to be there.

  • #24896

    robrunrob
    Member

    Hall certainly hung in there with the big dogs. 

    I've been impressed with the things that he has been saying about his training and racing.  He seems like a pretty grounded, humble guy.  He knows he has more to learn, but also has the confidence that he belongs with the absolute best marathoners in the world.

    So now I start to wonder, if he does it right, how fast can he go a couple of years down the road?  Very exciting prospect for a fan of US distance running.

  • #24897

    WI MTP
    Member

    This year he says he is faster and more fit.  I think he could go low 2:06 if he ran his own race, but this is London and he will be racing with the big dogs and not running his own pace.

    I still think he can crack 2:07, if it is a good weather day.  Finishing somewhere between 4-6th place.

    I was impressed he ran his own race – Letting the lead pack go and then rejoining at 35K.  I do think the uneven 1st half pulled the chance of a world record away from the field.  The pacers were up and down on the pace acccording to reports and not as even as they should have been.  Still a great race – I love Hall as a runner and a person, but as a young and up and  comer you have to give Wanjuri a huge vote – half marathon record holder and a low 2:05 marathon – he is already great and his coach is patient so hopefully he will wow us for years to come.  Maybe next year or year after it will be the epic battle between Wanjuri and Hall.

  • #24898

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Yes, Wanjiru is the young marathoner who my eye is on. This guy has nothing but upside and, as an already low 2:05 runner, that is a dangerous thing. I'm looking forward to what he can do in the future. Hall definitely gives American running fans more hope for the future than we have had for some time but Wanjiru gives world running fans hope for something very special in the future.

    (Stupid me, I can't spell…)

  • #24899

    tgrunner
    Member

    True, Wanjiru is phenomonal. I think Hall is underestimated to some degree. Its only his third marathon afterall – and he's only 25. I have a feeling we'll be watching the accolades for years to come from Wanjiru. All that said – I was most impressed with Lel in this marathon.

  • #24900

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    I don't know what to think of the coverage of Hall. I think some sell his potential short, while others seem to overfocus on him and think he's destined to be a world beater (I think he could be a world beater but, at that level, nobody is destined for anything).

    As for Wanjiru, this guy is amazing and largely unheralded in the American running media. He broke the world half marathon record three times before his 21st birthday. In his debut marathon, just over 4 months ago and less than a month after turning 21, he broke the course record at Fukuoka, not exactly a pushover marathon. Now, at 21 years old (he's listed as 20 in the London results but the IAAF has his birthdate as Nov 11, 1986) and in his second marathon, he pushes Lel quite hard and goes 2:05:24. This guy has the potential to do some very special things.

  • #24901

    tgrunner
    Member

    agreed on all points. Wanjiru is fun to watch – considering he and Lel will likely be appointed to the kenyan team, it should be a fun marathon to watch in the olympics this year. 

    Just out of curiousity, what are your thoughts on Ritz and the marathon distance?

  • #24902

    GTF
    Member

    I don't know what to think of the coverage of Hall. I think some sell his potential short, while others seem to overfocus on him and think he's destined to be a world beater (I think he could be a world beater but, at that level, nobody is destined for anything).

    I have not noticed any of the former, though certainly the latter abounds.  Hall will do what he will do, he has (apparently) made good decisions so far in his career.  It is obvious to all that he has great potential and was wise to move to the marathon when he did.  While London was likely better for his debut I would prefer to have seen him run BAA this year, though hopefully he might consider it for 2009.  He has come along at an interesting time, at a point when the marathon careers of Khannouchi, Keflezighi, and Culpepper are all but over and world class dinosaurs like Geb and Tergat are teetering on the tail end of the crest of their careers.  At the same time, there are great talents in the marathon ascending to or settling into the throne, such as Lel, Wanjiru, Goumri, Cheruiyot (what an evocative name, “chariot”), and Kibet.  The field at BAA and even non-WMM Rotterdam features/featured athletes who do or likely could belong in that same circle.  And then there are phenomenal talents such as Zersenay Tadese and Tariku and Kenenisa Bekele, who conceivably could move to the marathon in the next four years and could take it to a whole new level and relegate all the current “big dogs” to also-ran status.

    Just out of curiousity, what are your thoughts on Ritz and the marathon distance?

    He can be so erratic when it comes to getting to the line healthy and performing when it counts, at least during his pro career.  He could pop a couple of good marathons, that would not surprise me at all.  While the OG marathon is a WMM and considered a huge win and has the added intrigue of equalizing conditions and a constrained field, it is certainly a crap-shoot anymore and especially in the current cycle.  If he and/or Hall medals, he/they and his/their advisers look like geniuses (for both right and wrong reasons).  Most any runner would take one OG medal over multiple wins at other WMM races.  However, racing a marathon against that level of talent in the likely conditions in Beijing could come at a great cost — I would expect most of the top runners to go in with race plans that result in DNF if a shot at a medal is clearly not in the cards by, perhaps, 21.1 km or 35 km.  This way they could get out with less physical damage, get to recovering and training again, and take a shot at a marathon such as Berlin, Chicago, or NYC a couple of months later.  Taking it to the limit in that kind of heat and humidity can reduce marathon career span and quality.  Take Salazar and Beardsley as just two examples.  Kastor has been somewhat erratic in the marathon since Athens, same for Meb and Culpepper.  The same might also be said of Baldini.  However, for any of those named it could also be partly due to getting long in the tooth, chronologically and competitively.  Anyway, it is a tricky prospect, and knowing how Ritzenhein seems loath to DNF he may put so much into even a 5th-15th place (if not worse) finish that – especially given his apparently delicate nature – he might never be the same in the marathon. 

  • #24903

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    My take on Ritz is that he could do something special in the marathon. I don't know if his potential is equal to that of Hall's but I do think he has a lot of upside. That said, GTF raises a great point. His ability to remain healthy is questionable. Also, as GTF mentioned, I think it would be a great choice for Ritz (or anyone for that matter but Ritz has mentioned it) to choose the 10,000 over the marathon due to the conditions they will be facing in Beijing. I wouldn't be surprised if those conditions end the careers of at least a couple of the marathoners. It's going to take a lot to get through the marathon in those conditions and some runners will never be the same after doing so. Hopefully, the bright future of marathoners that GTF mentioned won't be too negatively affected by this. It would be a shame to see Wanjiru, Hall, or any of the other up and coming stars burn out before their times have really come.

  • #24904

    WI MTP
    Member

    As far as Hall goes – To me he is the most exciting american to come along in awhile.  He joins a bunch of other young runners currently on the scene – There used to be 1 guy being able to run 2:05, now there are some that have and many more with the potential.  Eventually the more runners close to the WR, one will substantially better the WR.

    If we had 20 Wanjirus' – 21 years old with his potential – I would say sub 2:02 or 2:01 or maybe even 2:00 would happen within the next 10+ years. 

    I would love for the USA to have 10 Hall potential type runners – But I think we have only one right now – So we cheer and media covers –  I think even the Kenyan's know a great USA hopeful is good for them – The more mainstream americans get interested in running the more money there will be available for Kenyans to get in endorsements and prize money. 

  • #24905

    tgrunner
    Member

    All very interesting points. Agreed that concerns for Ritz would be staying healthy and the discipline to succomb to a DNF if necessary. However, it would seem that his learning curve and ability would lend itself to potentially some strong marathon performances. So up and down though – I just don't know what to expect from him.

    Would be interesting to see Bekele target the marathon distance in the next 4 years, among others.

    I too would have probably preferred to see Hall at Boston, but given the talent pool in London this year, it was probably a better lesson race for him leading into Bejing.

  • #24906

    WI MTP
    Member

    If I were Hall I would have run London – Running a fast time is the more “Sexy” option.  And MTP – “Mikey the Pig” is all about being “Sexy”  ;D

    There is some truth in running a more technical course slower or a faster time on an easy course – Come on we all love to PR!

  • #24907

    GTF
    Member

    Ha!  So you would be all for Hall skipping Beijing and running Chicago, instead?

  • #24908

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    I too would have probably preferred to see Hall at Boston, but given the talent pool in London this year, it was probably a better lesson race for him leading into Bejing.

    I could go either way on that. I understand your point but Boston has more in common with an Olympic marathon in other regards. Not having rabbits, it's more of a championship-style race (though this year, it sounds like the rabbits didn't do all that good of a job making London a time trial-style race). Also, typically, the Boston conditions are more similar to an Olympic race than the London conditions are, though the conditions in Berlin could be so severe nothing will prepare anyone for what is to come.

    This could be just like last year, though. Getting out of this country allows him to fly under the radar a bit more, which would allow him to maintain his focus better on what really matters.

  • #24909

    WI MTP
    Member

    Ha!  So you would be all for Hall skipping Beijing and running Chicago, instead?

    MTP in a 70s disco suit with a gold medal resting on my hairy chest would be very sexy indeed.  But … its not a fair comparison – 2 marathons almost same date – running 5th with a 2:06 would be much sexier than running 3rd at Boston with a 2:09. 

    Maybe I am projecting myself into it, but worlwide more top people run London than Boston.

  • #24910

    BirdDog
    Member

    i'll be looking for MTP warming up at the next race in that disco suit  😀

  • #24911

    GTF
    Member

    What is “not a fair comparison?”  Anyway, just how much do those “top people” (or their PR's) mean to the casual observer or even the typical running fan?  Conversely, winning (or nearly winning) BAA would create MUCH bigger splash than 3rd or even 2nd at London.  The former would likely make SportsCenter, the latter would still be buried behind the front page of the sports section of Anytown USA's fishwrap.  Stats are not “sexy,” they are dorky — winning is what is “sexy.”  8) 

  • #24912

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    I have to agree with GTF on this one. How many people even know what a 2:06 marathon means? That's not going to gain attention. Heck, does the average American even know there is something called the London Marathon every April? The average American does know there is a Boston Marathon every April. I get asked about Boston every year in the days following the race. When DeHaven and Coogan ran so well there, several people at work stopped me in the hallway to ask me about it and those guys didn't even win. I can't imagine what in the distance running world, outside of an American winning Olympic gold, would make a bigger splash in the mass American media than an American winning Boston.

  • #24913

    WI MTP
    Member

    Thats assuming you think he could win Boston -3rd at Boston or 5th at London against a better field.

    If stats are dorky then why did they make such a huge deal about the 1/2 marathon Ryan ran at Houston?  He won, but that was not the big deal it was that he won in an American Record – AR is just a dorky stat.

  • #24914

    WI MTP
    Member

    Although I agree most people know about the Boston marathon – No one I work with (250+ people)has any idea when it is or anything about it.  Americans had a great showing in 2006 finishing 3-4-5-7-10-11 I had 0 conversations about it at work.  Of course Hall running a 2:06 at London – I had 0 conversations about it at work.

    So why do you think Hall has run 2 London Marathons?  0 Boston marathons?  Do you think Hall would beat Cheruiyot?  I do agree that Hall would have a better chance to win Boston with lessor top runners, but I also know he felt he had a chance to win London.  Why did he choose the harder race to win?  Why do more top runners worldwide choose London and Chicago over Boston?

    Boston is offering the most prize money of any of the wold majors … but of course I do not kwow how much guranteed money is handed out at London (Probably exponentially more)

    I am trying to follow your logic, since you have stated my logic is Dorkey, but … Hall is not following your logic either.

  • #24915

    GTF
    Member

    However Hall might perform at BAA this year is still hypothetical, challenging for the win against that field could be as possible as 3rd or worse.  Considering that BAA is an aided course, it could also be just as possible that Hall might have been able to run a faster time there than he did London, for those who believe that really makes much difference.  A US runner winning a major event on US soil would also be bigger than winning a major event on foreign soil, OG excepted, and it would be a slim minority that would be concerned with the relative quality of the field he would have defeated at either event.  If Hall's performance from last Sunday happened to be good enough to win Flora London and, for example, Ritzenhein happened to enter and win BAA this coming Monday while running two minutes slower than Hall, the balance of the hoopla (national media, sports media, running media) would be in Ritzenhein's favor.  Even making the podium at BAA is still better than being an also-ran at Flora London.  The numbers are a secondary concern, at best, to winning which is secondary, at best, to winning when and where it counts the most. 

    Hall taking 3rd at BAA would be on the front page of my local newspaper's sports section (likely above the fold) as opposed to below the fold on the second page, which was where the Flora London wrap-up (with mention of Hall buried deep within the copy) was.  That is how the sports world works, the winners are lauded highest and after them those who were closest to the winners.  How much attention is given to people who finish sixth at the Masters or sixth at the Tour de France?  Much less than is given to whomever finished third — the person in third is typically in a better position to realistically challenge for a win than whomever finishes sixth.  It does not matter if Tiger Woods and Vijay Singh were not in the field, winning a golf major is big in that sport — same for winning one of the WMM races in distance running, or coming closest.  BAA is a WMM event, it does not matter that the field is not considered as “strong” as Flora London's, just as it did not matter so much that Real Berlin had an incredibly weak men's field (worse than BAA's) when Gebreselassie set the WR there (except that it meant HG could dictate that no challengers would be in the field).  That stuff is parsed out by those with keener eyes — you and I might have a sense that winning BAA could be an easier task than winning Flora London was based on how much money Flora London throws into appearance fees as opposed to the BAA (digressing to a topic for another thread, perhaps).  However, it is a narrow segment that is interested enough in such minutiae.  2:05 and 2:10 are more or less the same in the eyes of the general sporting world, including 75%+ of all marathoners. 

    Who is this “they” you speak of?  Oh, I already knew that records (personal, school, state, national, area, world) are stats.  8)

  • #24916

    GTF
    Member

    Although I agree most people know about the Boston marathon – No one I work with (250+ people)has any idea when it is or anything about it.  Americans had a great showing in 2006 finishing 3-4-5-7-10-11 I had 0 conversations about it at work.  Of course Hall running a 2:06 at London – I had 0 conversations about it at work.

    So why do you think Hall has run 2 London Marathons?  0 Boston marathons?

    Two words come to mind: appearance fees. 

    Do you think Hall would beat Cheruiyot?

    I have no idea who Hall would beat until he faces them.  Today I would estimate that he has as good of a chance of beating Cheruiyot as he would of beating most anyone with a slower PR than his — conditions and tactics will play out differently on different days and on different courses and among different fields.  A faster PR is no guarantee, obviously. 

    I do agree that Hall would have a better chance to win Boston with lessor top runners, but I also know he felt he had a chance to win London.

    He felt wrong, apparently! 

    Why did he choose the harder race to win?  Why do more top runners worldwide choose London and Chicago over Boston?

    Those two words again: appearance fees.

    Boston is offering the most prize money of any of the wold majors … but of course I do not kwow how much guranteed money is handed out at London (Probably exponentially more)

    Yes, quite a bit more.  BAA is not as loose with the appearance fees as Flora London, Bank of America Chicago, or INGNYCM are — this is something I would like to see WMM address with regulations and perhaps even caps, especially so that someone like Gebreselassie and his agent do not hijack races like Real Berlin to orchestrate rabbited time trials. 

    I am trying to follow your logic, since you have stated my logic is Dorkey, but … Hall is not following your logic either.

    So, you speak for Hall's thought process now, as if you can look inside his head to see what he really thinks?  I will state for the record that I do not presume to know everything that goes into Hall's decision-making process, I am telling what would likely happen from my observations.  Also, I never labelled your argument as “dorky,” I would not do that — perhaps you read something incorrectly.

  • #24917

    WI MTP
    Member

    I do not speak for Hall's thought process – just his actions – He ran London and not Boston.

    I am having fun with this discussion and hope no one is taking offense – We are all running fans –

    The only they – I meant about his 1/2M AR is I seen it everywhere – Paper / 6 o'clock news and tons of internet stuff – I have to admit I had to search out information on Hall after London.

    and …

    I would  be very happy to see an American Winner of Boston

  • #24918

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    The stated reason for Hall running London last year was to fly under the radar. That would seem to go against the idea that finishing well at London would result in more attention than running well at Boston.

    As for what the average person sees and hears, all I can say is that, whenever an American finishes in the top 5 at Boston, at least a couple of people at work are asking me about that. I haven't heard a word about Hall's performance in London at work. Maybe that's because Boston results actually make a couple of the local papers. I don't think I've ever seen any London results anywhere in the local media and I question whether even running an AR or winning would get an American in the local media if it was accomplished in London.

  • #24919

    tgrunner
    Member

    seems one upside to London for Hall as well, is that it is one more opportunity to race against more of those who he will likely be in the mix with at Bejing. If/when Wanjiru is appointed to the team, I think it will be safe to assume that having toed up once before with him as a pusher will only benefit hall both tactically as well as mentally before this summer.

  • #24920

    GTF
    Member

    I do not speak for Hall's thought process – just his actions – He ran London and not Boston.

    Well, you were certainly implying that you surmised what his logic was in choosing Flora London over John Hancock BAA.  I stated what could be a likely result if he chose differently and that is a result I believe would be better for both Hall and the sport in the US — it would mean greater risk for Hall, though.

    I am having fun with this discussion and hope no one is taking offense – We are all running fans –

    It is all good, it is better to have this than nothing!

    The only they – I meant about his 1/2M AR is I seen it everywhere – Paper / 6 o'clock news and tons of internet stuff – I have to admit I had to search out information on Hall after London.

    It really made televised national news?  I was there when it happened so I only know how it was covered in Houston, at least in print.  The bulk of the stuff that I saw on the 'net regarded Hall's marathon potential based on that 1/2 marathon performance (especially to dust Keflezighi like that) and where he might run his marathon debut.  I do not recall the 1/2 marathon AR being such a huge deal in and of itself, not like perhaps the marathon AR or the mile AR.  Anyway, as I have long contended, (outside of baseball) records are overrated.  8)

    and …

    I would  be very happy to see an American Winner of Boston

    Unless and until John Hancock BAA achieves more equality with the other WMM races in terms of appearance fees, do not count on that ever happening. 

  • #24921

    Chris
    Member

    My thoughts on Hall are as follows.  In my opinion he's a 2:05 LOW marathoner at worst.  The pace he ran in London was sick.  I believe if he wouldn't have bombed the last mile he would have run what….2:05:45ish??  Make the first half of the race honest and the second half nice weather and he might have cracked 2:05!  Are the guys ahead of him capable of 2:03 high?  I believe it's possible in the perfect race.  Not likely, but possible.  

    Now as far as competing I'm not sure he can beat some of the guys with slower PR's because it may come down to closing speed.  That's my concern with Hall.  I'm not a huge follower, but I've not seen him lay down a big finish at any race.  I think he may need to try to string the big finishers out early in a championship race and we saw how that tactic didn't work in London so????????

  • #24922

    GTF
    Member

    Yes, that makes sense.  There is no way Hall would have it easier at John Hancock BAA than he did at Flora London.  Even guys with PR's a minute or two slower than Hall's could use their veteran seasoning to wage tactical warfare with Hall, especially in the absence of rabbits.  Hall's 'poor' finish at Flora London was a function of mistakes earlier in the race. 

  • #24923

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Chris, good point. Hall hasn't really shown a big finish, especially in the marathon (outside of the Olympic Trials where he was simply head and shoulders above the rest of the field). Of course, part of that in the marathon I think has to do with the fact that he was racing with guys who were simply better than him. Both times in London, he hung with them until he couldn't any more, then he faded. If he keeps working at this thing, one of these times, he might find himself not fading. However, whether Boston or London, he can't simply run with the lead pack and not fade if he wants to win. Maybe it's only a matter of time until he develops the ability to go 2:05 pace, then drop the hammer in the final 2 miles. Until then, though, he's probably not going to be winning whether he's in Boston or London.

    As for his AR half marathon, I didn't see any coverage in the general media locally or nationally. The only coverage I saw was what I found in the online running media.

  • #24924

    Run
    Member

    I do not speak for Hall's thought process

    this isnt why he ran the race, but here he explains his thoughts during the race, interesting…

    https://web.archive.org/web/20080421195222/http://www.flocasts.org:80/flotrack/flotrackr/profile.php?u=6875&v=blog&id=2911

  • #24925

    WI MTP
    Member

    Hall

    “briefly I entertained the thought of letting the leaders go and running an even paced race on my own but this was not the reason why I trained so hard and traveled all the way out to London. My purpose in coming was to learn how to race against the worlds best by going out with them from the beginning. I was, what they call in poker, “pot committed.”

    Kindof an answer from the blog – Thanks for that link

  • #24926

    GTF
    Member

    So he would not have faced as much of a challenge in Cheruiyot, Kiplagat, Bouramdane, and co.?  What about in the field of non-WMM Rotterdam?  The point is that Flora London should not be considered unique in fulfilling that purpose for someone of Hall's level . . . yet.

  • #24927

    WI MTP
    Member

    I wonder if I will see Ryan as we spectate the Womens' Trials ? 

    GTF – If I happen to see him, should I let him know to run Boston next year or suffer your wrath  ;D

  • #24928

    GTF
    Member

    Though I would not look for him, since you are now on a first-name basis with Hall be sure tell him to skip Beijing and run with tougher fields on faster courses like INGNYCM or Chicago, while you are at it!  8) 

  • #24929

    WI MTP
    Member

    Nothing trumps a Gold Medal

    TTFN

  • #24930

    GTF
    Member

    What a keen grasp on the obvious that is.

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