long run for shorter races

Welcome! Forums Running Forum long run for shorter races

This topic contains 4 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  cesar 9 years, 10 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #10515

    cesar
    Participant

    hey everyone,

    how important is the long run for 5ks and 10ks,?? my PR in the 10k is 44:38, this year i have run 44 minutes in 10k ,3 times, but haven't broken my PR, My workouts tell me that i am capable of running 42-43 minutes for the 10k, but i can't, i do all the T pace stuff , all the i pace stuff , but i don't do long runs so often, and when i do them are  10-13k.

    cesar

  • #26307

    GTF
    Member

    5Ks and 10Ks have 88% and 94% aerobic contribution, respectively.  From that, it should be obvious that aerobic development plays a huge role in how successful one will be in racing those distances.  That comes more out of aerobic volume and (ideally) not just one run from the entire week — to focus on one run to the exclusion of its training context is unwise.

  • #26308

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    The long run plays a role but, as pointed out, it's also the total volume of the entire week. I would recommend a long run of around 10-15 miles, give or take depending on total volume, for someone focusing on a 10K but more important than that is getting out for a good chunk of distance at least nearly every day.

  • #26309

    ed
    Participant

    I've stepped up my overall distance recently.  I used to run 3-5 miles 5 days a week.  I have changed that to 7-8 miles a day 6-7 days a week.  I am going to add a long run this weekend and aim for 12 or so miles. 

    I have noticed over several on and off attempts at running that the more daily miles I build -the better I do at medium distance races.

  • #26310

    rlana
    Member

    May your body don’t used to running long distance, unless it has run those distances on a regular basis that is why many coach advices 2 runs every week. I think you should set a mileage then increasing it gradually. For example, if you are running 10 miles a week increase it to 20 miles a week. To the point of increasing do not jump to 20 miles right away. Work your way up a little over time. After you increase your mileage and maintain than you can do the intervals.

    check this out for further tips
    http://www.marathon-training-schedule.com/training-for-a-marathon.html

    i hope it helps.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.