Marathon recovery?

Welcome! Forums Running Forum Marathon recovery?

This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Run 13 years, 11 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #1309

    Run
    Member

    I am running a marathon, my first, April 25. My question is how to bounce back in time to run in a big local 5 miler about 1 month later. Assuming I can walk, what kind of training should I do in those 4 weeks to sharpen my speed for a 5 mile race? Thanks for any and all advice,

    Tim

  • #13817

    r-at-work
    Member

    I’m a slow, older woman, but I would think that some principles apply across the board… the best way to recover fast is to do the marathon at your current level of training, hydrate & fuel correctly (before/during and after)… then there are are a few things that have worked for me, ice bath as soon as possible after the race (I wear a sweatshirt during this process) and walking after the race… the best recovery I have had was one where I didn’t wait for the bus & walked two miles to the parking lot…

    walk/jog the next few days, get lots of sleep.

    when you can start back into training is very personal, I usually do okay but last fall I ran a second marathon four weeks after one that slowed way down because of the heat and found it took lots longer to recover from the second one than from anything I’ve ever done…

  • #13818

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    The ice bath and keeping moving are two key points. Ice baths are becoming more popular all the time but a lot of people still say complete rest for the first X days (usually a week). I prefer the idea of some walking after the marathon and getting out for some kind of run or walk the next day. If you want to take a few days off, make it after the first day after the marathon. Get moving on that first day after, it will help your recovery.

    As for what to do from then on, your first goal should be full recovery. Whatever you need to get that in. Depending on your goals with the next race, I would possibly mix in some strides to get the turnover up and trust that the marathon training built up enough fitness to run well in that race also.

  • #13819

    Anonymous

    Am I crazy?? I ran my first marathon Sunday and feel great. I’m a little sore and tired but am quite surprised how good I feel. Am I crazy to run the San Francisco Women Nike 1/2 marathon this weekend? It’s a dream of mine to cross the finish line in San Francisco (oh, and I want the Tiffany necklace :)!

  • #13820

    Peter
    Member

    I am running a 5 miler on Nov. 6, Five weeks after my marathon. The past 15 days have been ok, I have run 12 of the days, and most runs have been 5-7 miles at moderate pace. Your overall fitness from your marathon training will serve you well in any distance race after the 26.2, and you should be fine a month later.

    My feeling is – I’ll run fast when I feel up to it, and not sweat any structured workouts between the marathon and the 5 mile race, because the marathon was my goal race. I’d like to run as fast as I did for the 8k race I did eight days before Lakefront (29:07). We shall see……..

    Good luck!

  • #13821

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    SF Bound wrote:
    Am I crazy?? I ran my first marathon Sunday and feel great. I’m a little sore and tired but am quite surprised how good I feel.

    No but you’re doing quite good. Actually, I ran Chicago only 10 days ago and I’m already having trouble holding myself back so I can get in a true recovery period. Within 3-4 days, I felt like I hadn’t even run a marathon. I was shocked by how quickly I was recovering and it sounds like you’re doing equally well.

    As for the half marathon, I personally wouldn’t do it. In fact, I didn’t run that many miles total in the week following the marathon. However, in 2002, I ran a 5k only 13 days after a marathon that beat me up very badly. While it wasn’t as fast as I would have been capable of 2 weeks earlier, it wasn’t nearly as bad as I thought it would be. All I’ll say is proceed with caution. I doubt you’d be able to really race it but, if your recovery is going as well as you say, you could probably get through the distance.

    Of course, none of us really knows. Only you know how you feel. Marathon recovery is a very individual thing. While it would be extremely unexpected, maybe you’ll surprise me and be able to race the half. Just be aware that the other extreme could also be a reality.

    Is my answer enough on the fence?

  • #13822

    Anonymous

    Thanks for the “food for thought.” I will think it through and decide on Friday.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.