Missing Boston Runner

Welcome! Forums Running Forum Missing Boston Runner

This topic contains 16 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  SwampTiger 13 years, 3 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #2444

    SwampTiger
    Member

    Wasn’t there a third poster on this site that said he was running Boston? Zeke posted a spring race list and someone else replied that they were running Boston. I don’t remember who though.

  • #18406

    Anonymous

    It was not me hoever I ran boston with verry little training 358 miles to be exact since Lakefrount. I wont bor you with why.

  • #18407

    Anonymous

    OOPS!!!

    I did manage to get 4 weeks in a row 6 weeks out.

    week 1 – 38 miles with a long run of 12

    week 2 – 49 miles with a long run of 18

    week 3 – 58 miles with a long run of 23

    week 4 – 42 miles with a long run of 21

    Most of my running was at 8 – 9 min. pace.

    My first Boston

    miles 1- 14 around 7:30 pace

    miles 15-16 7:45

    miles 17-26.2 8:35

    Final time 3:29:26 3420 Place

    I am happy with my run !!!! It was a great time

    Da KOOCH

  • #18408

    cameron
    Member

    kooch…you can do more with less than most of the general running population…unreal.

    what’s next?

    (also, bounce me an email from your road runner account when time permits)

  • #18409

    Anonymous

    Every year the family goes to Green Bay for some fun and run time. Last year my doughter Katie ( 5 years young ran the 1/2 mile race in 4:20 and brought home a trophy YOU GO GIRL !!!! So that is next for sure I may run Ice Age if I can bounce back soon from Boston.

    KOOCH

  • #18410

    Peter
    Member

    HUSKER was to have run Boston. I do not remember his name, only that he had a Bib # in the low 4000 range. Hope he did well and posts here sometime soon.

  • #18411

    Anonymous

    Dan said he was going to break 2:40 at Boston and has yet to check in. I hope he doesn’t keep us in suspense too much longer.

  • #18412

    Husker
    Member

    It’s probably me. I ran Boston and was shooting for sub-3:00. I was about 1:30 exactly halfway but the heat and hills caught up with me on Commonwealth and I struggled mightily the last few miles to end up over 3:09 – missed a PR by about 40 seconds. There’s a lot I learned from this race, and in hindsight I probably should have adjusted my goals for the conditions, but I decided to go for it and see what happened. Well, I did and I’m glad that I have nothing to regret, but my legs took a hell of a beating out there. I’ve been taking ice baths almost daily to aid in the recovery which seems to be helping. Done a few short runs recently and the soreness is slowly working its way out. Boston was really cool though, I highly recommend it. Probably won’t go back next year as I want to do a local marathon next spring, but someday I’ll return to Boston; I’ve got a score to settle.

  • #18413

    GTF
    Member

    This comment is not intended to be at all personal in nature, but rather a general observation based on several sources of input. Considering how 2003 and then 2004 went, one would think that those heading for Boston would start to give some thought to preparing for the heat in their training. I do not know if there were similar stretches of warm weather for Boston twenty years or so ago (though the previous year’s infamous ‘Duel in the Sun’ may indeed have been considered a premonition) yet Benji Durden, for one, knew to prepare for the possibility and it paid off in a big way.

  • #18414

    Linz
    Member

    I posted to that earlier thread and did run Boston, if that’s what you want to call it. With less than 40 miles logged in the four weeks prior to Boston due to a shin splint (or worse… never got it checked out), my legs were not ready for the hills. Heat was also a factor, though that was not something I could really train for in our climate. Adding insult to injury, I felt my knee ‘pop’ at 24… luckily it was right in front of an aid station. After a 20 minute ice break, I limped (quite literally) home for a glorious 4:48 finish (3:11 qualifier) in my first Boston. 🙁

    The ‘pop’ was originally thought to be torn cartilage (per ER analysis in Boston), but may only be a medial meniscus strain (per orthopedic analysis today). Needless to say, I’ll be back training as soon as I can so I can qualify again and avenge my less than stellar performance. 😈

    At least I can take a little comfort from the fact that I persevered and completed what I started. Next time will be much better…

    Mark

  • #18415

    GTF
    Member
    Linz wrote:
    Heat was also a factor, though that was not something I could really train for in our climate.

    Untrue. Durden did it through very simple means: overdressing. Too bad about the injury, it is good fortune that it is not more serious.

  • #18416

    Peter
    Member
    GTF wrote:
    I do not know if there were similar stretches of warm weather for Boston twenty years or so ago (though the previous year’s infamous ‘Duel in the Sun’ may indeed have been considered a premonition) yet Benji Durden, for one, knew to prepare for the possibility and it paid off in a big way.

    According to a historical account of the 1983 race, where Durden ran his PR:

    “Despite predictions of dire weather in Boston, and a foot of snowfall as near as Pittsfield the day before the race, marathon morning dawned sunny and cool with an aiding tailwind. As race time approached, clouds began to fill the skies, and by the time BAA governor Tom Brown fired the shotgun at noon in Hopkinton, there was a drizzle falling in Ashland and east of Framingham. When the field gushed out of Hopkinton, the weather was ideal: 49 degrees, clouds and a gentle tailwind.”

    I am aware of the unorthodox way that Durden trained, where he wore several layers of clothing, even in warm weather. It undoubtedly was beneficial for him and his success, but your inference of how it helped him at Boston because of warm weather does not seem to be exactly relevant in this case.

  • #18417

    SwampTiger
    Member

    Husker……You gotta take your shot and sometimes you get it, sometimes you don’t. Still, within a minute of a PR at Boston is impressive. Way to tough it out.

    Linz….too bad about the injury. It had to be discouraging and I imagine most people wouldn’t have finished. Hopefully you’ll have a quick recovery. Let us know how it goes.

  • #18418

    GTF, appreciate your comments and I’m far from a Boston veteran having run only two but I think training for the weather is tough to do at Boston. There is no way to tell what you’re going to get. You hope for 50 and a tail wind but we all know that’s the impossible dream. The reality of Boston is that it’s tough to predict even the day before the race.

    Waiting for the race to start, the temp felt like it was approaching 70 though I expected the headwind to keep us cool for awhile. It was supposed to get cooler when we turned at Newton Lower falls but I didn’t notice any difference.

    Going in, I felt I would take my shot as long as the weather wasn’t ridiculous. In my mind 80 was ridiculous and cause for considerable adjustment. I thought I could deal with 70.

    In retrospect, I probably would have done better had I gone out slower but I’m glad I went for it. Maybe warm weather training may have helped but I doubt it. Warm weather training would have done nothing for my screaming quads at the 22 mile mark. I will prepare for this race again and my focus will be to hit the hills harder and more often.

  • #18419

    GTF
    Member
    Peter wrote:
    It undoubtedly was beneficial for him and his success, but your inference of how it helped him at Boston because of warm weather does not seem to be exactly relevant in this case.

    You are indeed correct, except that you mean “implication” and it was my poor choice of phrasing that led to that. If one talks to Durden, he will tell that heat preparation helped him mightily in his racing.

  • #18420

    GTF
    Member
    Steve From NJ wrote:
    GTF, appreciate your comments and I’m far from a Boston veteran having run only two but I think training for the weather is tough to do at Boston. There is no way to tell what you’re going to get. You hope for 50 and a tail wind but we all know that’s the impossible dream. The reality of Boston is that it’s tough to predict even the day before the race.

    This is why one who is armed with foresight prepares for the possibility of heat, considering how prevalent warm conditions have been in recent years. If it turns out to be 40s or 50s, then there is no negative affect from having prepared for the possibility of heat, if anything such conditions will feel even more comfortable. However, if one prepares only for the possibility of cooler temperatures and such expectations do not come to pass and conditions turn out to be warm, then one has hurt one’s own chances at a decent performance by choosing to not prepare.

    Going in, I felt I would take my shot as long as the weather wasn’t ridiculous. In my mind 80 was ridiculous and cause for considerable adjustment. I thought I could deal with 70.

    Was this not disproven? It would be wise to use it as a learning opportunity.

    In retrospect, I probably would have done better had I gone out slower but I’m glad I went for it. Maybe warm weather training may have helped but I doubt it. Warm weather training would have done nothing for my screaming quads at the 22 mile mark. I will prepare for this race again and my focus will be to hit the hills harder and more often.

    True, no amount of warm weather training would matter when one is neglectful in another aspect of training which is specific to the race course. However, this is like deciding that in training speedwork is more important than basework, when each has its appropriate place in successful race preparation. Overlook the impact of either and ignore distinct possibilities at one’s own risk. As I tried to indicate initially in this thread, these words are not intended as some kind of chastisement directed at anyone at all, merely some thoughts worth considering for those who wish to perform well at this particular marathon.

  • #18421

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Bottom line: when preparing for the heat, overdressing is an effective technique if you live in a cold place. When training for Boston, especially given the conditions at recent editions of the race, it would make sense to prepare for the heat.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.