Modifications to Pfitz plan

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  randys 13 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #1569

    randys
    Member

    I am training for an October marathon and looking to lower my PB (from 4 weeks ago) of 3:29 into the low 3:20’s (even better a sub 3:20).

    I have run 7 marathons and have always trained according to my own schedule (based on ideas from several authors). I am still over 18 weeks out and have been reviewing several books (Daniels, Lydiard and Pfitz) to see if I can more closely follow a ‘formal’ plan this time around.

    Of the 3 I feel Pfitz ‘Advanced Marthoning’ best fits my needs but I have 2 issues that need to be resolved.

    I am running around 70 mpw and my weekly milage has been consistant for over 2 years. I add only about 5 or 10 mpw every 6 months (after each race, spring and fall) so either the 70 mpw schedule (best match) or the over 70 mpw (which maxs at 92) may work for me. My issues are:

    The schedule calls for as many as 3 easy days a week of 10 miles split between 6 in the AM and 4 in the PM. Because of work and family I can only get out for a single run every day. Doing the entire 10 as a single run would allow me to maintain the weekly milage but may make the run less ‘easy’ then is intended. What would you do it if you didn’t want to run doubles?

    My current milage is in line with the 70 mpw schedule but I run a 7 day schedule. The over 70 schedule is 7 days but may be too much of a milage increase this quick (max of 92 mpw). How would you modify the schedules. Make the 70 mpw schedule into a 7 days schedule (perhaps add a 5 mile easy run on the ‘off’ day) or lower the milage on the > 70 mpw schedule to something I could handle easier?

    Randy

  • #14918

    ferris
    Member

    here’s my thoughts…

    1. if you cant do the 2 a days to toal 10, just run 1 time that day and try to hit about 7-8 miles. I have the same situation, and really can’t get out for 2 runs in a day, unless run #1 is at the crack o’ dawn, and thats just not my thing. It’s always better to run 7 instead of thinking about running 10.

    2. I wouldn’t suggest adding a 5 mile run on the off day. The off day is there for a reason…to take it off and rest. If you are at 70 mpw, a 5 mile run instead of an off day, in my opinion, isn’t really doing all that much for you. The rest is probably more important so you can make sure you are ready for the more intense days, and with a family, thats 1 day where you dont have to get in a run so you can spend more time/attention on other things.

  • #14919

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    1. I agree with ferris on this. Before I read his post, I was actually thinking just do a single 8 miler if you decide 2 a days are out of the question.

    2. I was actually going to say no schedule in a mass produced book should be expected to be followed to the letter. If you really want to run on that off day, just make it very easy. Don’t fall into the “no days off allowed” trap but I think just as bad as that trap is the trap of scheduling days off when you don’t need them. No single run is going to make that much of a difference but doing an extra 5 miles every week for 18 weeks is an extra 90 miles of aerobic conditioning. Even taking the day off half of the time and running 5 on that day every other week results in an extra 45 miles of aerobic conditioning. It may be small but, if you can handle it, it could be one of the many pieces of the puzzle.

  • #14920

    NBB
    Member

    I did exactly what you’re suggesting – added a 5-6 mile run on the scheduled day off. If I was tired or too busy, I skipped it, but I figured that as long as I was feeling good, an easy run the day after the weekend’s long run actually loosened me up a bit.

    I also changed doubles into singles, added a mile or two to runs when I felt good – I stayed between 70-80 mpw for most of the training cycle (rather than maxing out at 70 as the program calls for).

    At one point I started feeling the strain on my ‘hard’ days, and cut back a bit, which worked fine.

    In sum, I think it’s completely possible to follow the 70mpw plan & adjust it to your current training level & life schedule.

  • #14921

    pski
    Member

    Randy, I’ve done the 18 week over 70 plan. I did the doubles very easy about two hours apart or just half, the 6 or 4 and left it at that. It’s plenty. If your already at 70 mpw, starting with this table and going to 92 is not going to be a stretch. If I did this again, I would jsut do the easy 6 part of the 2 a days and skip the evening session. 2nd shift doesn’t help this plan either. The up to 70 will leave Sunday’s off as we’ve adjusted the days, and makes all the wives happy!! PSKI

  • #14922

    Anonymous

    Sounds like your well prepared to handle the volume. I followed the 70 mpw plan and modified the mid week distance runs. I just couldn’t find the time to fit the first few in and replaced them with 8-10 mile easy runs. I was able to get in a few 90 minute semi long runs during the last 6 weeks that helped me a bunch.

    I’d agree with the others and do one 8 mile run on the easy days to fit in with your schedule. If things change and you can get in the double, all the better.

    From my experience with the Pfitz plan, the important thing is adhering to the overall philosophy. The first time I did intervals according the plan I was worried, they were too slow. I also had a tough time with a 30k race one month out, again it felt much harder than I felt it should have. Things eventually picked up at the right time. Roll with the mesocycles, trust the plan and focus on the end game.

    Steve

  • #14923
    pski wrote:
    Randy, I’ve done the 18 week over 70 plan. I did the doubles very easy about two hours apart or just half, the 6 or 4 and left it at that. It’s plenty. If your already at 70 mpw, starting with this table and going to 92 is not going to be a stretch. If I did this again, I would jsut do the easy 6 part of the 2 a days and skip the evening session. 2nd shift doesn’t help this plan either. The up to 70 will leave Sunday’s off as we’ve adjusted the days, and makes all the wives happy!! PSKI

    If you were just taking 2 hours between the runs, why not do the run in one fell swoop? That makes no sense to me unless there is a time constraint issue or scheduling issue.

  • #14924

    pski
    Member

    sub3marathon,

    I got your question about the 2 hours in between those doubles in the over 70 MPW Pfitz plan. When I did cover a total of 10 hours first these were all recovery type slow miles. I was averaging 82 to 84 mpw for 18 weeks leading up to Boston. I trained like an animal, and then to put in a 6mile 4 mile two a day was brutal already. I still liked the idea of seperating those runs by at least 2 hours, or I’d occassionally skip the 4 mile shot. Several factors as to why, kids not off to school til 8:00 am. I’d get moving by 8:30 or 9:00 and I work second shift, 3-11 pm with the possiblity always looming to work much longer than that. When I was in the throws of this training, at the paces it demanded, I welcomed even two hours between runs. I never fooled myself into thinking I could get rolling at 11:00 pm after work and just did what I could do. 2 hours of recovery was as good as 8 to 10 for me, and I came eeriily close to me goal at Boston, within 52 seconds. Not bad for a 39 year old slow as molasses runner of 5 1/2 years. Hope this answers the ? Regards, PSKI

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