New runner looking for a little advice

Welcome! Forums Running Forum New runner looking for a little advice

This topic contains 30 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  Bulldawgrunner 9 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #10615

    Hello ! Great forum with lots of info!

    I'm a new runner looking for a little advice.  I live in north Georgia (metro ATL) and started running about a monthe ago.  I have always been active (tennis basketball), and I have seemed to adapted to running fairly well.  THis past weekend I ran 4 and half miles Saturday, just over 5 on Sunday. This is up from 2 miles on my first run.  My neighborhood that I run is veryy hilly as well.  I also have a treadmill for rainy days.

    I'm going to be entering my first 5K on 11/22.  Wanted to see if you experienced runners had any advice to help me not embarass myself, and make sure I know proper race etiquette.

  • #26409

    Run
    Member

    Number one piece of advice for your first 5K, line up according to where you think you'll finish, fast people up front, slower people in the back.  Other than that, just pay attention to whats going on around you and enjoy yourself.

  • #26410

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Lining up is a big thing. Lining up too far forward will be both embarrassing and dangerous, especially in a 5K when, depending on the quality and size of the field, you could end up with a large mass of runners trying to go very fast and get around you in any way possible. If you're not sure where to line up, figure out what time you will be expecting to run and ask some people who are lining up what they are aiming for. Find the area where the typical person is right around your range.

    Other than that, you're doing the right thing by choosing a 5K. There's not too much that can go drastically wrong. Don't start out too fast. If you do by accident, correct yourself asap. Even if you do start out too fast and don't correct yourself, though, it's not like you're going to be walking for 10 miles. Everything else would be the standard logistics you've probably gotten in the habit of doing on your training runs (double knot your shoes, make sure you've used the facilities, etc).

  • #26411

    SBSpartan
    Member

    I would add two things. 

    One – Make a time goal.  If that time goal means running faster than your training pace make sure you have practiced at your goal pace so you know what it feels like.  Don't be like me and go out there running by guessing (although it's fun and semi effective for a 5k).  If you ask me for a 5K you should be uncomfortable almost the entire time.

    Two – Stop posting.  I should be the only guy from GA here.  😉

  • #26412

    Run
    Member

    If you ask me for a 5K you should be uncomfortable almost the entire time.

    I don't agree 100% here.  I think the first mile, even if its a fast one, usually doesn't feel uncomfortable (a little adrenalin goes a long way ;))  During the second mile is when I start to feel concerned, thinking, “maybe I did go out too fast?” (this is when the discomfort starts for me)  And then by the third mile its just pain, and trying to hang on.  Thats one of the things I like about the 5K, for me at least, the pain is only lasts a few minutes.

    But now that I re-read the above quote, I guess I do kind of agree, there is some discomfort for most of the race ;D

  • #26413

    thanks for the responses!  I really dont want to be “that guy” who pisses everyone off because I don't have a clue!  Will keep in mind where to line up, and will most likely just stay way back.

    I guess I'll do 5K training run tomorrow to see where I stack up. I'm hoping to get under 30 minutes pretty easily.  From the feel of my runs I dont think this will be problem, won't know until I clock it though.

    Funny thing is I started running to try an lose 10 pounds or so.  Now, I'm doing it for enjoyment, and the weight thing is just a bonus. 

  • #26414

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    While I take some heat in some circles for it, I also do like the idea of having a time goal. Some people say you shouldn't for your first race but you should at least have an idea of what you're capable of and setting a goal gives you incentive to determine what you're capable of, then stick to the plan to get there. If you don't know what you're capable of, how do you know you're not going to get in over your head or sell yourself way short?

    Funny thing is I started running to try an lose 10 pounds or so.  Now, I'm doing it for enjoyment, and the weight thing is just a bonus.

    That's great that you found the enjoyment in running. In doing so, you just greatly increased your chances of both meeting and maintaining your original goal but also living a healthier and, hopefully, happer life. I love it when people state what you just did.

  • #26415

    rehammes
    Member

    You've gotten some great tips from great runners, good luck with the 5k!  I would also suggest to focus on the runner in front of you.  Many 5ks are void of much stilmuli between the start and finish, and it is easy to fall into a slower pace than you are capable of running.  Try to get closer to the runner in front of you with every step.  I find the race goes by much faster, and I don't focus on running out of my comfort zone.  Also, crowds like a strong finish.  If you've got anything left in the tank for the last mile, give it hell.  Be sure to let us know how it goes.

    Rob 

  • #26416

    Anne
    Member

    Hopefully this will be the first of many races in your future. The important points have already been mentioned.
    Give yourself plenty of time before the race so you're not in a rush to get to the start line. Wear clothing & shoes that you've already tested out on training runs, you don't want any surprises on race day.
    One thing I notice novice runners doing is stopping in the middle of the race course to take water, this can make for some quick footwork if you're behind them.
    If you need water, run to the side of the course by the water tables so those not stopping can get by.

    Enjoy the experience & the people, with each race you'll learn something new that you can keep in mind for your next race.

    Best of luck to you! 

  • #26417

    Ed
    Member

    Congrats on joining a great group of people “runners”!  If you are goignt o take a hit of water on the 5K do NOT do what I did in my first race.  Do NOT inhale the water so that you are choking for a mile and a half.  Practice grabbing a cup and drinking it on the fly – I sure wish I did that. ::)

  • #26418

    LOL !  I hope I can make it without a sip.  Would I be better off getting an estimate for speed on the treadmill, or should I stick to running it outside?  I guess I could drive my route to get an aproximate distance.

  • #26419

    Ed
    Member

    Now I do my 10 miler morning runs with no water – I drink a bunch the night before and get a drink after – but none during.  Of course I am not racing those 10 mile morning runs and it is way cooler in WI than GA. 

    Stick to running outside, the wind, the surface and a miraid of other intangibles make a big difference. 

    I started with a real cheap radio/timer thing that I set to beep every 4 minutes and that was my goal each and every 1/2 mile.  I drove around and made mental notes of what each 1/2 mile was so that I knew when the 4 minute beep sounded I knew where I had to be. 

    I wouldn't worry to much about pace – though – Only a month or two of running will give you a good taste for getting ready for a race but not enough.  I am still learning that.  Take this first race as a lesson in how to race – when to make moves, when to hold back and when to make a go of it.

  • #26420

    Ed
    Member

    OH by the way.

    Welcome to Hillrunner.com!!!

  • #26421

    OH by the way.

    Welcome to Hillrunner.com!!!

    Thanks!  Going to time my run tonight, first time I have timed myself.  I have two routes, one is a 3.1 miles (5k)  and the other is 5.1 miles.  I let you guys know how I do, both routes have some decent hills, but I have been training on them.

  • #26422

    I'm not sure which one I will run yet ???

  • #26423

    Ed
    Member

    Since you are planning a 5K race I would run the 5k route tonight.

    A time trial like what you are doing is great to help you determine the paces you should train at.  Also, as you get closer to your race try and find a route that mimics the race route.  Hills, number of turns etc . . .

  • #26424

    well, 32:38 …  Something I can build on!  This route is very, very hilly.  How much of a difference could that make?  I think I'll 
    give it a whirl on the treadmill and see how they compare.  Should I do that on a 1 percent incline?

  • #26425

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    If you're going to try a treadmill time trial, I'd definitely set the incline to 1%.

    What is the race course like compared to the routes you're running? Less hilly, I'm guessing based on your comments. If so, maybe a goal of breaking 30 flat would be attainable. In your first, though, I'd suggest a conservative goal. Get your feet wet before diving right in with the big goals.

  • #26426

    Double
    Member

    I never agreed with the setting the incline.  I figured if I was on the mill I wanted my legs moving as fast as I could get them to go.

  • #26427

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Double, interesting thought. However, if trying to approximate what you could do on solid ground, wouldn't you want to set the incline?

    Then again, leaving the incline at 0% may help account for the race day excitement/adrenaline factor that you will not experience doing a treadmill time trial. OK, I take back the “definitely”. I could see arguments for either way.

  • #26428

    Ed
    Member

    You still need to account for the lack of wind resistance on the mill.  Plus a mill has more of a lifting effect with the legs than a pushing effect like on the ground.  Minimal differneces but differnces just the same.

  • #26429

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Ed, I think Double's point is that you just accept those factors and take advantage of them. Kind of like running on a slight downhill for some overspeed training. Double put me on the fence as to whether it would make sense for a time trial type of workout, seeing as those factors may be balanced out by not having the race day adrenaline or motivation of chasing people down, but it's a very interesting thought when it comes to training runs as a way to pick up the turnover and speed things up a bit.

  • #26430

    If you're going to try a treadmill time trial, I'd definitely set the incline to 1%.

    What is the race course like compared to the routes you're running? Less hilly, I'm guessing based on your comments. If so, maybe a goal of breaking 30 flat would be attainable. In your first, though, I'd suggest a conservative goal. Get your feet wet before diving right in with the big goals.

    THe course is not nearly as Hilly. What I ran yesterday has a full mile beginning stetch all up hill and pretty steep in spots.  I get winded everytime I run that stretch, its the opening mile.  Then recovering the rest of the way.  I might try to hit the park by my house this weekend, they have a nice mile loop with very little elvevation changes. I just starting out, so I know time is not of the essence.  I am actually more satisfied with my ability to run over 5 miles with out stopping.

  • #26431

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    I just starting out, so I know time is not of the essence.  I am actually more satisfied with my ability to run over 5 miles with out stopping.

    For a beginner, you sure seem to have the wisdom (if that's the right word) of a veteran. It takes some people years to settle into that mindset and only then do they make big gains.

    Whatever happens in the short term, I get the impression that things are going to go real well for you in the long term.

  • #26432

    Thanks!

    Anyone ever use mapmyrun.com?  Well, I mapped last nights 5k, It came up 3.43 miles.  I dont know how accurate that is vs. the odemeter on my car?

  • #26433

    msubobcats
    Member

    8) Welcome to the forum. Many years of great running is ahead of you, 😀

  • #26434

    Ed
    Member

    If you have the exact size tires your car rolled off the assembly line with and they are properly inflated – the odometer should be pretty close.  I have tried mapmyrun and use it all the time and find that it is close as long as you zoom in very close and very carefully place your markers.

    There are almost no guarantees of exactly measured distances – even at sanctioned/certified courses.  Always be prepared to go longer.

  • #26435

    heres the run.  207 feet of elevation?

    http://www.mapmyrun.com/route/us/ga/canton/404423796494 

  • #26436

    SBSpartan
    Member

    Good job on your first race.  It can take a while to figure out how to race rather than train.  You will get it though.

    My thought on the treadmill is simple.  You live in the south and really don't ever need to run on that thing.  It's very rare when the weather is so bad I can't get outside.  Running in the hills and elements will do you good.  Call it karma from the running gods. 

    PS – I hate treadmills so I am a bit biased.  But seriously the weather down here is great most times so why be indoors?

  • #26437

    Well,

    I ran 30 miles last week, the most by far for me!  Saturday, I ran 5.1 miles in 43 minutes 13 seconds.  Little less than two weeks to my first 5K.  My route(nieghborhood) is very hilly and doesnt give me much of a grasp of what I can expect to run.  Still hoping for  high 20's???

  • #26438

    SBSpartan
    Member

    Bull –

    You are a new runner.  Try to go out and NOT worry about timing everything you do.  Just go run and build your base.  Everything else will come. 

    I NEVER clock a mile when I train.  Now, I am not lightning fast, but I can place in my age group (30-34) in most 5K's (about 19:45 usually) and 10K's (PR 41:50).  The most important thing right now is building your base.  After a while you can start doing the other things like speedwork and learning pace(s).

    Just go out and enjoy yourself.

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