Nike Zoom Miler

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This topic contains 23 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  stealthycat 13 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #2223

    stealthycat
    Member

    Can I trust the reviews on RRS on this shoe? Anyone try ’em?

  • #17659

    G8torunner
    Member

    I was about to buy them, but according to my local running store, they will not last very long (even if called a ‘high-mileage shoe’) and Nike gets quite a lot of returns of these shoes. I got the Nike Pegasus 2004 instead.

  • #17660

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Which reviews? The ones that say it is a nice, lightweight shoe or the ones that say the soles blow out between 100 and 200 miles? 😉

  • #17661

    stealthycat
    Member
    G8torunner wrote:
    I was about to buy them, but according to my local running store, they will not last very long (even if called a ‘high-mileage shoe’) and Nike gets quite a lot of returns of these shoes. I got the Nike Pegasus 2004 instead.

    Yes, I have noticed that sometimes their idea of high mileage and my idea of high mileage are 2 different things. I think RRS considers anything over 25 mpw “high mileage” 🙄 So that would put me in the “very high” bracket, while I consider myself in the “low” bracket, mileage-wise…. 😕

  • #17662

    stealthycat
    Member
    Ryan wrote:
    Which reviews? The ones that say it is a nice, lightweight shoe or the ones that say the soles blow out between 100 and 200 miles? 😉

    That’s what I’m talking about. Which reviews are more accurate? 🙄 I went ahead and ordered them since it was free shipping and I can send them back after 60 days (surely the soles will blow out within that timeframe) 😀 By that time I will have put over 400 miles on them.. ha ha ha … They’ll be trash. LOL

    I’m only kidding. I’m not that dishonest, but I’m not afraid to send back a pair of shoes that don’t work for me… 😉

  • #17663

    Zeke
    Member

    I think they look nice in the catalog and have been tempted to buy them but haven’t. Let me know how they work for you.

    I like RRS, but don’t really care for the copy in their catalogs. All they ever mention is mileage, frame and arch. I like Eastbay’s running-specific catalog and website, for copy on shoes.

    http://www.runtheextramile.com

  • #17664

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    stealthycat wrote:
    Yes, I have noticed that sometimes their idea of high mileage and my idea of high mileage are 2 different things. I think RRS considers anything over 25 mpw “high mileage” 🙄 So that would put me in the “very high” bracket, while I consider myself in the “low” bracket, mileage-wise…. 😕

    I remember calling RRS once and asking them what they considered low, medium, and high mileage. If I remember, high was something like 30 or 35 and above. Ahh, yeah, that’s high mileage. I guess it’s all relative.

    stealthycat wrote:
    Which reviews are more accurate?

    Maybe both are accurate. It’s a nice, lightweight shoe for the first 100-200 miles, then the midsoles blow out. 😉

  • #17665

    Zeke
    Member
    Ryan wrote:

    Maybe both are accurate. It’s a nice, lightweight shoe for the first 100-200 miles, then the midsoles blow out. 😉

    Wouldn’t it be even lighter after blowing out the midsole? 😉

  • #17666

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    Zeke wrote:
    Wouldn’t it be even lighter after blowing out the midsole? 😉

    Possibly better ventilation, too. The cushioning may not be as great, though.

  • #17667

    stealthycat
    Member

    Zeke, I will let you know how they work out… I’m not expecting a miracle, I’ve been through a lot of shoes. Currently in the NB 833 which is a good shoe, but I guess I am still dissatisfied…. 🙄

    Ryan, I also went to a podiatrist once who considered 25 mpw high mileage, so I guess it’s all relative… For a runner who is looking to up their game, become more competitive 25 seems pretty low to me, but it might be considered high to a social runner… To each his own, I guess. 😉

  • #17668

    Anonymous

    As a middle distance runner running high school xc in the fall and 300m IH and up to the 800 in the spring, I usualy get around 45-55 mpw on my training schedule. I’m not sure what kind of races you guys run, but during xc season i usually hit 50 or 55 when racing 5k’s

  • #17669

    stealthycat
    Member
    CBNA Runner wrote:
    As a middle distance runner running high school xc in the fall and 300m IH and up to the 800 in the spring, I usualy get around 45-55 mpw on my training schedule. I’m not sure what kind of races you guys run, but during xc season i usually hit 50 or 55 when racing 5k’s

    That’s about the mileage I run, but these other guys are running 70-100+ 🙂

  • #17670

    Anonymous

    70-100 mpw is more collegiate level running anyway. Guys who get to 100 too early burn themselves out and they are only fast for a few weeks of peaking. My coach still runs in the 15’s and he only hit 100 miles once or twice during college (and he said he was crazy then) haha. Most college runners i know are goin 70-80 mpw. Well that’s all I have to say.

  • #17671

    Anonymous
    CBNA Runner wrote:
    My coach still runs in the 15’s and he only hit 100 miles once or twice during college

    15 meaning 15 minute range for a distance of 5 kilometers

  • #17672

    stealthycat
    Member
    Anonymous wrote:
    CBNA Runner wrote:
    My coach still runs in the 15’s and he only hit 100 miles once or twice during college

    15 meaning 15 minute range for a distance of 5 kilometers

    Well, I think these guys are training for marathons, etc. Good for your coach on his 5K times, that’s awesome. 😀 You’re right in that a slow build is a better one. I’m not afraid of going up in mileage, but as I only hit the 50’s for the first time last fall, I’m in no hurry. 😉 You’re doing great yourself, keep up the hard work. 🙂

  • #17673

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    CBNA Runner wrote:
    Guys who get to 100 too early burn themselves out and they are only fast for a few weeks of peaking.

    It’s more about how you get there and what you do once you’re there than the number itself. People can burn out running 50 mpw or less if they don’t do it right, others benefit greatly from 150 mpw or more because they do it the right way.

    CBNA Runner wrote:
    My coach still runs in the 15’s and he only hit 100 miles once or twice during college (and he said he was crazy then) haha.

    Sounds like your coach is a good runner. I hope he’s as good at coaching as he is at running. Yep, that’s about right. You have to be a little crazy to spend 1.5-2 hours a day on average running.

  • #17674

    Zeke
    Member

    I’m not really sure what difference a low, medium or high-mileage runner has on a pair of shoes. Do my shoes need a break between each run?

    What’s the difference between someone wearing the same pair of shoes for 25 mpw or someone running 50 mpw but alternating shoes? If the life span of a pair of trainers is roughly 500 miles, it doesn’t matter how many miles per week I run. The only difference would be how quickly I wear them out.

    Also, keep in mind that the NB 833 and Nike Zoom Miler are light weight trainers. You’re probably not going to get 500 miles out of them.

  • #17675

    Zeke
    Member
    CBNA Runner wrote:
    70-100 mpw is more collegiate level running anyway. Most college runners i know are goin 70-80 mpw.

    I figured Ryan would jump in on that one. Those are pretty generalized statements. I’m sure if you went to a Footlooker meet and asked what everyone’s weekly mileage is, the majority would be over 70 mpw. Same for a D1 national meet, they’re probably all over 80 mpw. If you’re talking about the local high school conference or the area D3 school, then your probably right. However, there’s nothing wrong with setting your sites a little higher.

    Guys who get to 100 too early burn themselves out and they are only fast for a few weeks of peaking.

    Isn’t that when you want to be fast, when your peaking? I’d bet you like to run “fast” in the very first meet of the year, then just gradually improve a little as the season progresses. The guys doing 100 mpw don’t care about the early season dual meets. They’re training through them and looking forward to the meets that count, conference, regionals, sectionals, state, nationals, etc.

  • #17676

    stealthycat
    Member
    Zeke wrote:
    If the life span of a pair of trainers is roughly 500 miles, it doesn’t matter how many miles per week I run. The only difference would be how quickly I wear them out.

    Well said. 😆

    How many miles do you expect out of a pair of lightweight trainers? Mine seem to hit around 250-300 miles…. I’m not that happy with it, but I don’t want a huge shoe on my foot either. 😕

  • #17677

    Agree w/ Zeek. Another important factor to consider in the mileage you should expect from your shoes is your weight. I’m 150-155 and put 400-500 miles on trainers before they’re done. My friend is 125 and can get 200-300 more out of the same shoes.

  • #17678

    Zeke
    Member
    stealthycat wrote:
    How many miles do you expect out of a pair of lightweight trainers? Mine seem to hit around 250-300 miles…. I’m not that happy with it, but I don’t want a huge shoe on my foot either. 😕

    I probably get 350-400. Steve’s right about weight too. I’m about 145 lbs and I run a lot on trails. I could probably get more than 500-525 out of my trainers, but I figure, “why chance it?” Besides, I like shoes.

  • #17679

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    Zeke wrote:
    The guys doing 100 mpw don’t care about the early season dual meets. They’re training through them and looking forward to the meets that count, conference, regionals, sectionals, state, nationals, etc.

    As my coach in college used to say, everything before Conference is just the Burning Stump Invite. Nobody will remember who won the Burning Stump Invite a month from now. They will remember who won Conference and Nationals years from now.

    Also of note is the fact that the high mileage runners seemed to beat the low mileage runners throughout the season when I was in school. They just beat them by more at the end of the season. I also remember Chris Solinsky, training at 100 mpw as a high schooler, dominating the competition all the way through the season and finishing by winning Foot Locker. That seemed to me like pretty consistent high level performance with a peak in December to beat a field full of the best high schoolers in the nation.

    Steve From NJ wrote:
    Another important factor to consider in the mileage you should expect from your shoes is your weight.

    Yet another important factor is your form. Regardless of weight, those who look like they glide over the ground when running tend to get more mileage on their shoes than those who look like they pound into the ground with a lot of vertical motion.

  • #17680

    Anonymous
    Zeke wrote:
    Isn’t that when you want to be fast, when your peaking? I’d bet you like to run “fast” in the very first meet of the year, then just gradually improve a little as the season progresses. The guys doing 100 mpw don’t care about the early season dual meets. They’re training through them and looking forward to the meets that count, conference, regionals, sectionals, state, nationals, etc.

    What I meant was a few weeks of peaking too early in the season. I saw quite a few high mileage seniors come into the season going 100 mpw. The rest of us runners had a hard time touching them at first, but these 100 mpw’s slowed down dramatically by the time New Englands came around. I also agree that it depends upon how you approach high mileage. With the correct training, 100 mpw can be very beneficial.

  • #17681

    stealthycat
    Member

    I just had to laugh because I had picked up RW out of pure boredom, and was reading the article about Paula Radcliffe…. What do I see but the picture of her on the sidewalk when she quit at Athens, and what shoes is she wearing? The Nike Zoom Miler. 😆 Cracked me up.

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