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This topic contains 9 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  rehammes 13 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #4222

    rehammes
    Member

    1. Last week was a relatively high mileage week for me (~78). As I posted my weekly, I realized that my diet was not at all rich in carbohydrates last week. Not intentionally, it just happened that way. That led me to think back on each individual run. I didn’t feel drained during any of them. My questions are these: Does limiting your carbohydrate intake force your body to use protein and fat more efficiently? When I begin to take in more carbs, will I have a surplus of energy? Should I just shut up and eat more pasta? (meaning: is this a bad habit to get into if high mileage is a goal?)

    2. Has anyone tried out the Nike Free shoes yet? I must say that I was intrigued with the idea at first. I wanted to try them out. I probably went to half a dozen shoe stores and couldn’t find them anywhere. (then I lost interest) I forget in which running periodical I saw an ad for them, but some of the literature they hope you don’t read closely leads me to believe that they are not intended for high mileage. (after wearing them for 6 weeks, you can finally wear them on runs over 5 miles, but only 2-3 times per week. Unless I am reading it wrong.) That struck me as interesting since Nike was pushing them hard at the Boston Marathon Expo.

    3. Finally, during my run through Mequon on Range Line Rd today, just like every other time I run there, I was run off the road by a car that would not yield the right of way. What is your biggest pet peave of running? For me, it is that. Second place would be cars that stop in the crosswalk while waiting for the light to turn green and then third place would be the shouts of ‘Run Forrest, Run!’ from passing cars.

  • #18698

    GTF
    Member

    1. Maybe, but it also limits your ability to recover — so, yes to the final two questions.

    2. Yes, and I was underwhelmed. Interestingly, one can get the benefits from barefoot running by running without any shoes at all.

    3. I enjoy my runs and do what I can to cope with and get beyond things that I cannot control rather than allow them to grate on me.

  • #18699

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    1. Personally, I’d say focus on a healthy diet and, if your running is going well, don’t worry about it. What I would say about carb intake, though, is that it is like high octane fuel for a race car. Would you put the cheap stuff in a race car hoping to make it run more efficiently on that or would you give it the high octane fuel it requires?

    2. I’m not familiar with this but it sounds a big gimicky. Wouldn’t be a big surprise considering the source.

    3. Leash law violators. I can’t go over 1-2 weeks in Minooka Park without a serious incident involving one of these idiots, one of my most recent incidents involving a dog larger than me. The idiot owners of this dog showed such concern, their response was to casually walk up to get the dog while telling me “don’t worry, he’s just a puppy, he won’t bother you” after the dog almost ran me over and then was standing eye to eye with me. After that incident, I’m not going in the park again without pepper spray. I know I will end up using it before this summer is over, I just wonder what response I will get from the owners when that time comes.

  • #18700

    ksrunner
    Participant

    1. Eat healthy. Generally that should include carbs. Even the government recommended diet includes some emphasis on whole grain foods.

    2. The Nike Free is a bit intriguing. After reading about a local barefoot runner, I gained some interest in it, but my interest waned as I realized that trying to acclimate my feet to running barefoot would take a lot of time. Currently, I prefer to spend my time training to run fast. If I were given a pair, I would try them, but I wouldn’t buy them. If it becomes important to run barefoot, I will find a grassy park and take off my shoes.

    3. Drivers are also a problem for me. Drivers that do not slow down on dirt roads and kick up huge clouds of dust and drivers who do not dim their brights when I’m running at night with a reflective vest. I usually try to make it clear that I am blinded by holding my arm in front of my eyes. In town, I’ve noticed that often the drivers who have made me most nervous have also been talking on cell phones.

    Ryan, The amount of trouble you have with dog owners who refuse to take responsibility for their pets is just incredible.

    Ryan wrote:
    Leash law violators. I can’t go over 1-2 weeks in Minooka Park without a serious incident involving one of these idiots. … After that incident, I’m not going in the park again without pepper spray.

    It’s too bad that it’s the dogs rather than the owners who will get the pepper spray. I know that you’ve said that the police won’t come to enforce the laws. Perhaps the local news station could be interested in doing a story. It would be more interesting than many of the stories that they do on slow news days and it would raise awareness — which could also influence the police action.

    Steve

  • #18701

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    ksrunner wrote:
    1. Eat healthy. Generally that should include carbs. Even the government recommended diet includes some emphasis on whole grain foods.

    Actually, don’t government guidelines take it a step further and make whole grains the cornerstone of their recommended diet? This is how it should be, as nutritionists have been trying to tell us for years.

    ksrunner wrote:
    It’s too bad that it’s the dogs rather than the owners who will get the pepper spray. I know that you’ve said that the police won’t come to enforce the laws. Perhaps the local news station could be interested in doing a story. It would be more interesting than many of the stories that they do on slow news days and it would raise awareness — which could also influence the police action.

    As I have stated many times, I would prefer to spray the owners rather than the dogs since it is the owners who are actually creating the dangerous situation. Unfortunately, legally, my only option is to protect myself from the immediate danger, which means I have to spray the dog and only spray the owner if I feel threatened by the owner.

    As for how to deal with the situation, I have thought about taking it to the news but I have also been in contact with my county supervisor about the situation. He has taken a genuine interest in the situation and has ensured me that park employees will be keeping an eye out for loose dogs and, if the owners do not listen to them, calling the police. I want to give him a chance to make this work before giving an overall excellent park system a bad reputation because of this issue that I have been told is being addressed. Now, if the issue isn’t addressed, my next step is to contact any member of the media who will listen.

  • #18702

    r-at-work
    Member

    1. forget what the govenment says and find what works for you… and keep in mind that as you age it will change… I have found that I need carbs most for recovery, that liquid carbs are best for my runs of over an hour and that potatoes do for me what pasta does for others

    2. I LOVE the comment from GTF “…one can get the benefits from barefoot running by running without any shoes at all. “

    3. pet peeve is people who set up something that interferes with my running plans and then either don’t show up or drag getting the thing started to the point I could have run first and showed up late and no one would have noticed…

    -Rita

  • #18703

    randys
    Participant

    I am going to skip ahead to item 3; the pet peeve. This one really gets me.

    How about drivers as they get along side of you blast their horn!

    This happens to me about once a week. I never anticipate it and usually feel like jumping out of my skin.

    Just the other day someone tossed a can of soda at me from a pickup truck! That only happened once so I guess its rare enought to not qualify as a ‘pet peeve’.

    Plus, It may have been an ‘accident’. We passed each other in opposite directions at a curve in the road. Its possible the centrifigal force going around the curve caused the can to bounce around the bed of the truck and jump out. Since it was full and unopened its at least possible.

    Randy

  • #18704

    ksrunner
    Participant
    Ryan wrote:
    Actually, don’t government guidelines take it a step further and make whole grains the cornerstone of their recommended diet? This is how it should be, as nutritionists have been trying to tell us for years.

    I thought so too, but I needed to get ready for work and did not take time to look it up.

    Ryan wrote:
    I want to give him a chance to make this work before giving an overall excellent park system a bad reputation because of this issue that I have been told is being addressed.

    I hope things get better with the dog situation. I tried carrying pepper spray once, but the wind made it impossible to deploy it effectively and the dog was smart enough to back off immediately if I made any non-running move. Now, I just avoid running past that particular house. That dog is not necessarily the most threatening. It is just the most annoying as it barked incessantly at my heels for 1/4 mile or more. It was also disconcerting to look down and see the flashing of teeth each time it opened its mouth.

  • #18705

    jtpaten
    Member

    2. The Nike Free ads are running in a lot of mags right now but sans much info about how they require an extended ‘breaking in” period, which is ironic.

    3. Dogs. Just this weekend, the two of us were running on a rail-trail and could see a dog standing on the bridge as we approached. It stood very still and didn’t bark at all, which made us all the more nervous. As we got closer, we deliberately shuffled are feet and yelled in hopes of scaring it off. Still no reaction from what looked like a young, untrained and unpredictable canine. Only when we were within feet of the bridge and its sentry, the both of us clapping and yelling, did the dog’s owner emerge from under the bridge, call his dog and mutter apologies.

    The dog never did make a move toward us. How were we to know this unsecured puppy was not alone? We just did what we usually do: Confront the animal aggressively, yelling “No!” It usually works, sending a dog bounding back the way it came. But I suppose its risky; such a technique could anger a dog.

    While I’m not one to carry pepper spray, I’m not above picking up a stick as I approach a yard/farm where I know such animals roam free.

  • #18706

    rehammes
    Member

    Thanks for all the response about carbs, your opinions have been helpful. I also enjoyed the comment about running barefoot, I believe I laughed out loud.

    I would like to comment on the dog situation which obviously bothers many people. As a dog owner, dogs causing problems in parks concerns me. The inevitable result will be to close the park to dogs. I live within 1/4 of Brown Deer park, where dogs are not allowed. (although hundreds break this well-posted rule daily) I don’t know the history, but I have a suspicion that it stems from owners failing to control their dogs and the county not wanting to be liable for any problems. Too bad.

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