Registration for the 2009 Boston Marathon is now closed

Welcome! Forums Running Forum Registration for the 2009 Boston Marathon is now closed

This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  GTF 10 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #10869

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Initial thought: if registration is filling up nearly 3 months in advance and this trend continues, does that warrant a tightening of the qualifying standards which have been loosened over the years in order to allow field sizes to grow? Or does it warrant reducing the number of charity entries allowed? Both? Neither? Some food for thought.

    Registration for the 2009 Boston Marathon has closed as the race has reached its capacity.

    The Boston Marathon does not have a waiting list, late registration on race weekend, or race day registration.

    The names of all official entrants are published on the B.A.A. web site.

    Please note that bib numbers are not transferable. Those attempting to transfer their bib numbers, as well as those in receipt of a transferred entry, will be disqualified.

    The 114th Boston Marathon will be run on Monday, April 19, 2010; the B.A.A. tentatively plans to begin accepting applications for the 2010 race in September 2009.

    Qualifying times obtained after September 27, 2008, can be used to compete in the 2010 Boston Marathon.

  • #27034

    Neither, what could they gain from less lax standards?  I can think of only one group of people who might benefit from tighter standards and it would be neither race organizers nor the hordes of current entrants (i.e. customers) who are able and willing to pay ever-increasing entry fees (months ahead of race day) as well as whatever it costs to fly in and stay in the city. 

  • #27035

    ed
    Participant

    It may take a long time but eventually a lot of big races will lose their repuatations as premier events and been knopw as high participation events.  It does not do much for the nostalgic people but for the average one and done runner that is just fine.

  • #27036

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    It may take a long time but eventually a lot of big races will lose their repuatations as premier events and been knopw as high participation events.

    This has already begun in some regards. Take a look around and a lot of experienced runners have already begun shunning the mega events in favor of smaller, well organized events.

  • #27037

    Neither, what could they gain from less lax standards?  I can think of only one group of people who might benefit from tighter standards and it would be neither race organizers nor the hordes of current entrants (i.e. customers) who are able and willing to pay ever-increasing entry fees (months ahead of race day) as well as whatever it costs to fly in and stay in the city. 

    well…….are you going to tell us who that “one group” is, you're leaving me hanging  ???

    Another thought is that if they loosen standards so much, would they lose the people that have to go every year as a “bragging rights” at what point are the time standards not worth bragging about?  I have friends that just “have” to go every year.

  • #27038

    Neither, what could they gain from less lax standards?  I can think of only one group of people who might benefit from tighter standards and it would be neither race organizers nor the hordes of current entrants (i.e. customers) who are able and willing to pay ever-increasing entry fees (months ahead of race day) as well as whatever it costs to fly in and stay in the city. 

  • #27039

    Well, if you have to ask . . .  😉
    The point was that any other “group” is immaterial to the “haves.” It used to be that this race was the marathon for elite and sub-elite US distance runners.  Compare it with Fukuoka, which does not have the entrant numbers (and is male-only), but has a couple of rather tight entry standards, brings in an incredibly deep competitive field, and for a long time was the de facto world championship marathon and is at least still a de facto national championship.  Competitively speaking, outside of the invited (i.e. paid) elites, it now is a regional marathon.  The race has gone the direction that its organization wants to take it and clearly that has little at all to do with quality of performances or, as you note, prestige.  All things being equal and given that I am not among those who live within a day's drive from Boston, I would sooner fly to Japan and run one of the great marathons there than bother with John Hancock BAA as it now exists.

  • #27040

    Well, if you have to ask . . .  😉
    The point was that any other “group” is immaterial to the “haves.” It used to be that this race was the marathon for elite and sub-elite US distance runners.  Compare it with Fukuoka, which does not have the entrant numbers (and is male-only), but has a couple of rather tight entry standards, brings in an incredibly deep competitive field, and for a long time was the de facto world championship marathon and is at least still a de facto national championship.  Competitively speaking, outside of the invited (i.e. paid) elites, it now is a regional marathon.  The race has gone the direction that its organization wants to take it and clearly that has little at all to do with quality of performances or, as you note, prestige.  All things being equal and given that I am not among those who live within a day's drive from Boston, I would sooner fly to Japan and run one of the great marathons there than bother with John Hancock BAA as it now exists.

    make sense.  thanks for answering. 

  • #27041

    It is simply true of any standard-based measure, it tends to become diluted and loses luster anytime it is lowered.  Qualifying for John Hancock BAA presents absolutely no challenge to me and in my view it should not for anyone else with an appropriate approach to performance-based distance running.  In a lowered standard that is more inclusive for something that has limited space, inevitably the result will be shutting out those who could have easily met even the old standard yet (unlike a good portion of those who could only get in under the new standard) do not have the luxury of being able to financially commit to a significant race fee with a significant amount of training time between when registration closes and race day.  The chasm between invited elites and the uncompetitive masses grows.

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