Running in the dark

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This topic contains 16 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  randys 13 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #1966

    randys
    Participant

    The clocks have been changed, and here in the north, darkness is coming earlier and earlier.

    I got home late last night and ran my first “after dark” run of the season.

    Ran a very enjoyable 13; had a great time! I ran the same roads I do every day, but the feeling after dark is different than in the light of day.

    Does anyone else enjoy running (on the road) after dark?

    I have only one complaint about running in the dark!

    Cars with their bright head-lights turned on.

    There blinding when heading towards you, and ruin night vision after they pass by. For several long seconds you run without the benefit of sight; not the most comfortable feeling!

    One other after dark complaint: dogs (hate hearing barking dogs as I pass a house; when you can’t see the dog, you can’t tell if they are fenced/chained or free chasing me).

    In the scheme of things both are minor complaints. I still enjoy the different perspective I have of the world when running in the dark.

    Philly update: Still feel good; ran 13 last night at 7:45-8:00 pace. Very comfortable; felt like I did before the leg injury! Looking forward to a long run (23) on Saturday.

    Randy

  • #16608

    ferris
    Member

    Amen to that, brotha! Where I do most of my runing is on a parkway that is full of deer, and people just love to sit and watch them. That’s cool, but they see something running and they get all excited “ooooh Helen, there’s one!” and just friggin blind me with the brights. They are all disappointed that I’m not Bambi, and I get blinded. I HATE THAT! What I have started doing is when I see a car coming, I just stare at the curb and don’t look at the lights……They still see me, and I don’t lose my vision for the next 200m. Just one of those things you gotta deal with as a runner….that and the High school punks famous lines of “run faster” or “nice shorts, fag”

  • #16609

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    I’m with you, I actually love running in the dark. As for bright lights, I would also rank that as the #1 annoyance. The worst is when they don’t have their bright lights on as they are approaching you, then turn them on when they see you. Thanks a lot idiot. As ferris does, I usually end up staring at my feet when those people go by, only glancing up long enough to make sure I’m not dealing with one of those idiots who like to run people off the road.

    The dog thing is a double edged sword. I’ve actually experienced relatively few uncontrolled dogs during the winter. While it is a bit unnerving at times when you can’t tell whether they are controlled or sometimes even where they are, I usually feel safer in the dark because there are simply not near as many loose dogs in the winter as there are in the summer.

  • #16610

    randys
    Participant

    Your probably right about the number of loose dogs in winter being lower.

    The thought was stuck in my mind because of last nights run.

    I was going down a road, darker than most, in a very quite area, when suddenly I heard the angriest, loudest (and what sounded like the largest) dog in the world.

    I looked around but couldn’t locate where the sound came from. For the next several minutes I kept imagining the dog was coming up behind me.

    Felt spookier than those rare occasion when I have to run with my back to traffic. (something no runner should do, day or night, never put your life in the hands of a driver who may be adjusting the radio or busy drinking coffee, or both at the same time).

    And about the high schoolers yelling stuff as they go by. That doesn’t happen offen but at least every week some jerk will drive up along side and suddenly blow the car horn. Sometimes, especially when I am focused, it makes me almost jump out of my running shoes!

    Randy

  • #16611

    ferris
    Member

    OK, I’m glad to hear I’m not the only one who gets scared when the horns blow! Man, that freaks me out, and nothing cold be worse than when it happens during mile 16 of a 17 miler in the heat. You are just at the point of your body completely shutting down, then “HOOOONK”……that sux.

  • #16612

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    How about still getting a “Run Forrest, Run!” I got one of those about a month ago. My response was something along the line of “Get a new line!” I don’t mind the hecklers as long as they come up with something original and creative, I just laugh at it. It’s the ones that I have been hearing for most or all of my running life that need some work. The only ones that really bother me are the obscene ones. A couple of times this summer, people have dropped the f-bomb as I was running by little kids.

    The horns do suck. I swear I’ve jumped higher than I have thought possible, found new max heart rates, sidestepped like Barry Sanders, and done a few superhuman moves when being startled by horns. There’s nothing like being in the zone during a tempo run or a long run, locked into a rhythm and rolling through a great run, and having some idiot snap you out of the zone with their horn as they pass by on the other side of the street.

  • #16613

    Mark5000
    Member

    Yes, the lights… you’d think I’d be safe since I do most of my running on trails, but nope. Even though I have little trouble seeing where I am going on the dark trail (often go as fast as tempo pace), these jerks have to wear headlamps that blind me for a good 30 seconds or so. And if it’s not the headlamps, it’s the flashlights… they have to shine them right at me at least once or twice it seems. To make matters worse, they are sometimes in a group that is stretched out onto my side of the trail. All I see is a bright light, and not the people walking or running beside them. Makes for some interesting near collisions. Throw in some dog walkers with their 8-foot leashes (trip wires) and plenty of groups who hog the hell out of the trail and seem to have no interest in the other runners out there, and maneuvering in a congested road race feels alot easier.

  • #16614

    r-at-work
    Member

    I thought about this thread last night as I did my run and the sun went down… it wasn’t the lack of light it was not knowing when I’d hit the next puddle, lot more standing water than I would have thought on the sidewalks… people turning into the side streets were nice, probably figured anyone out in the rain & the dark was more unpredictable than they cared to deal with…

    last week I was on the track as the sun went down and since no one was practicing they didn’t trun on the lights… that was nice, no traffic to worry about, even surface, even turns and the lines sorta glowing from the distant street lights… no on else but me… really fun…

    -Rita

  • #16615

    Mark5000
    Member

    Oh ya… running on a dimly lit track all by yourself is awesome. I run at 5 AM, so I have it all to myself the vast majority of the time. It’s easy to concentrate, I like being able to run my repeats backwards (easy on the ITB), and it brings back memories of my high school track days.

    Running on the trail is great too… didn’t mean to complain quite that much, hehe.

  • #16616

    Peter
    Member

    Is great in the morning vs. evening for several reasons…

    –Far fewer cars out (and less idiots driving them too 😆 )

    –You get to finish in the morning twilight, as opposed to starting in light and finishing in the dark

    –Usually calmer with less wind

    Only drawback is in the winter time it’s usually the coldest time of day from 5-7 AM. But I’ve been running during that time fram for 8 years now, and I am quite accustomed to it.

  • #16617

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    Peter wrote:
    –You get to finish in the morning twilight, as opposed to starting in light and finishing in the dark

    Not a problem. Just start and finish in the dark or do laps in Frame Park. That place is so lit up, it’s never dark.

    😉

  • #16618

    Anonymous

    Peter,

    How about getting a little more accustomed to the morning running. We have a title to defend man. Don’t go Kooch on us!

  • #16619

    Peter
    Member

    How about getting a little more accustomed to the morning running. We have a title to defend man. Don’t go Kooch on us!

    Not sure who you are ‘guest’, but I suspect it’s a JingleBell Run 2003 teammate. Double? Oh well, My 35 miles this past week included a nice tempo run yesterday where I FINALLY felt like I was able to run fast. I finished up the last 2 miles in 12:25. Ran what I consider to be a pretty good dynamic tempo run — 7:50, 7:20, 7:00, 6:50, 6:23 and 6:02. It’s been 3+ months since I’ve been able to do something (anything) like that! And I ran a nice 5 mile recovery run this morning. Maybe 39:00 is not out of the question in 5 weeks….

    That being said, I just found out my son has a Basketball tourney in Monroe on the 11th! 😡 SO I need to figure out how to get to both run and go to his games. I know I can do it, the Q is will the evil Cathy allow it? 😈 I’ll keep you posted….

    And, hey, if you’re relying on me to get hillrunner.com to keep the title, we’s in trouble… Need the whole team to get up, show up, stand up and be counted. Then run like hell and kick some serious a*s!

    btw, what did Kooch do to get in the proverbial doghouse?

  • #16620

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    Peter wrote:
    Not sure who you are ‘guest’, but I suspect it’s a JingleBell Run 2003 teammate. Double?

    Sounds like a Pski comment to me. The Kooch reference is a giveaway.

  • #16621

    Linz
    Member

    Didn’t mean to get Kooch in trouble… just giving him a hard time for taking a full three weeks off after LFM. Someone’s just jumping on the bandwagon I think. 😀

    Mark

  • #16622

    Anonymous

    Hi, I have to say I have enjoyed the comments on this thread on night running. Two nights ago as I ran a new route for me to get in a 6 mile run I passed a house where the thunderous barking forced me to turn around and run back the way I had come. Just as I turned a dog came bounding out towards me setting off one of those house lights that come on when something passes it. I thought I was dead. But it turned out that the barking dog was tied up and the running dog was as quite as a lamb. I have found that you should only run a route at night that you know well by day.

    On the lights thing; I run in a very country area in Ireland which is mostly inhabited by farmers.They are so delighted to see somebody new in their area that they stop to offer to bring you where ever you are going. One guy stopped beside me and said that if I was in that much of a hurry he’d bring me!

    Its so hard to hide from the guys cos’ the luminous jacket shines out.

  • #16623

    Ed 1
    Member

    You are very right about running a route you know well if you are going to try it in the dark – unless of course you like the mystery, terror and other stuff that comes with it. I hate getting charges at by dogs in the dark – not a good thing. But running that well known route where you can trust your surroundings in the dark can be so peaceful and allow for immersion into the run.

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