Training Days per week for 5k

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This topic contains 12 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  cesar 9 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #11613

    USC FAN
    Member

    Hi Everyone!

    I've been training and competing in 5 & 10k's on and off most of my adult life. I'm going to be 46 in a few weeks. My pb's are 15:13 for 5k and 33:04 for 10k. I'm nowhere near those times these days but I hold my own. I have 4 key workouts when training; 2 track, 1 tempo run or cruise intervals and a long run(7-8 miles). My question for you all is How many days a week does everyone run? I run 6 and average about 34-36 miles a week for everthing. Can I get away w/ running 5 days a week? I'm getting to the point in my life where I need some guidance from some of the other experienced runners. Thank you very much! ūüôā

  • #28132

    Andrew A.
    Member

    Can I get away w/ running 5 days a week?

    There is only one way to find out.  You are an experiment of one.

  • #28133

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Can you get away with 5 days a week? Depending on your goals, possibly. You'd most likely be a faster runner on 6-7 days a week but it mostly depends on what you want out of your running.

  • #28134

    Double
    Member

    I think you can if you have hay in the barn.  Then you can crack in down for  2-3 months.  That's basically what I do for marathon training in the summer with something like this:

    M – Off or real short and easy
    T – Intervals of sorts
    W- Medium long run
    R – Tempo
    F – Off or real short and easy

    Saturday and Sunday are a mix of long runs, medium runs, a race, or a longer tempo effort.  I try and do two out of that mix on the weekend.  That's five solid workouts, but I depend on what I did over the winter/spring to pull it off.

  • #28135

    cesar
    Participant

    yea you can, but remember that if you do 6 a week( 4 days extra a month), that adds mileage to the weekly and monthly volume, but if you need an extra day ooff, then go for it.

  • #28136

    Andrew A.
    Member

    yea you can, but remember that if you do 6 a week( 4 days extra a month), that adds mileage to the weekly and monthly volume

    No, not always.¬† If one is truly constrained to a certain volume level then generally one would be better off doing that volume over seven days rather than six or five or four — the greater consistency, the better, within reason.¬† Running more consistently does not have to result in higher volume, though it often is a good way to add volume if one is training well within one's limits.

  • #28137

    USC FAN
    Member

    Thanks for your insight everyone! Yes; I will experiment. As a competitor its crucial  to spend time on the quality of training more so than overall mileage when racing 5k or less.

    Cheers!

  • #28138

    Chris
    Member

    My body used to allow me to run more and at a higher level.  I'd run about 60++mpw during peak training.  I now run 3 days a week at most.   

    I was more a low 16's high 33's guy.  Now I'm a low 17's mid 35's guy or even high 16's.  So even going down to 3 days a week I'm able to run somewhat close to what I used to training at my highest level 7 days a week. 

    I currently do one hard workout a week.  2 easy runs unless I run a race then only one.   

  • #28139

    Andrew A.
    Member

    AKA accumulated (lifetime) fitness + individual variation.

  • #28140

    Andrew A.
    Member

    As a competitor its crucial  to spend time on the quality of training more so than overall mileage when racing 5k or less.

    The 800m has a 60% aerobic contribution, the 1500m has a 77% aerobic contribution, and the 5000m has an 88% aerobic contribution.  Success in the middle distances may not depend as much as the 10,000m (94%) or the marathon (99%) do on aerobic development, but it still depends mostly on it.

  • #28141

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    As a competitor its crucial  to spend time on the quality of training more so than overall mileage when racing 5k or less.

    Personally, that hasn't been my experience. On high volume/moderate intensity, I've gone 15:43. I've never broken 16:30 on moderate volume/high intensity.

  • #28142

    Chris
    Member

    I ran my 10K pr on low volume high intensity.  I was very very fast and sharp at the time.  5:20 pace felt like a jog.  That opposed to very high volume when 5:20 pace is working hard.  I've never run within 30 seconds of my PR in the 10K when training high volume.

    I should also note I ran a very good (for me) half marathon pr on 5K training.  Once again I was fast, but didn't necessarily have super great endurance.  5:40 pace was pedestrian so it was easy. 

    Of course maybe I just haven't had the right day.  I've just never felt quite as race sharp no matter what type of taper off of higher volume training.  Yes I understand all things equal high mileage is better.  I've just never been able to quite put it together when it matters. 

  • #28143

    cesar
    Participant

    i think i am like Ryan,  i do better running more mileage and no intensity( workouts), i ran my 5k PR of 20:32 and my 2 mile PR of 12:26 in my base phase, and when i was doing hard workouts and thought that i could run sub 20:00 , i just ran 20:37 and i was doing 2 wotkouts a week( v02max workout and a tempo workout), so i dont know but when you mention that  , i think that i might do better with less intensity and more miles.

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