USADA asking athletes to report others: good or bad idea?

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Ryan 14 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #1544

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Kelli White of the U.S., one of the world’s top female sprinters, not only accepted a two-year ban from the sport for using performance-enhancing drugs but agreed to turn stool pigeon and help the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) nail some of her fellow athletes.

    White, who was stripped of all of her victories and records going back to 2000, including the 100- and 200-meter gold medals from last year’s World Championships, is hoping to apply for early reinstatement to the world track and field governing body (IAAF) in accordance with the organization’s bylaws. White’s attorney, Jerrold D. Colton, said he expected USADA to seek bans against others caught up in the BALCO scandal.

    SI.com editorial

    This is an interesting topic but I’m not sure I’m totally sold on the author’s viewpoint.

    First, the Marion Jones thing. She says she is going to sue the USADA if they take action against her without a positive drug test. Well, if she was paying attention, she would realize that they do have the right to ban her if they have enough evidence that she took drugs, whether or not that evidence includes a positive test. After at first stating they didn’t have any evidence, her lawyer now admits that there was “some” evidence, whatever that means.

    Second, White helping out the USADA. I agree that her “helping out the sport” talk is a little weak when you think about the fact that she is preaching about helping out the sport by catching people who were doing the same thing she was doing. I doubt this new attitude would have come forth if she wasn’t caught. It looks like she’s really just interested in saving face and/or getting on the good side of people who can help shorten her ban. However, if she can help with information that will help catch more drug cheats, is this a bad thing? With the current state of the sport, where there is a cloud of suspicion hanging over nearly every athlete who can run at the world level, I’m not convinced that anything that could help clean up the sport and hopefully at least lessen that cloud of suspicion is a bad thing for the sport.

  • #14808

    Schpeff
    Member

    It will be interesting to see how the whole thing plays out. The whole “tattle tale” thing seems like something out of the McCarthy trials of the 1950s…..now people who doped may want to rat out their counterparts to save themselves. Maybe not, but that’s my 2 cents….

    I agree with Ryan though, just get the sport cleaned up. When you compete at that level, why would you ever want to jeopardize years of hard work by doping?

  • #14809

    Scattershot
    Member
    Schpeff wrote:
    When you compete at that level, why would you ever want to jeopardize years of hard work by doping?

    For the same reason athletes in every other sport do the same thing; you want that edge and will go to almost any length to get it. It’s a sad person, in my view, who is so consumed with competition (and let’s face it, money) that they will break the laws of their country and their sport to achieve ‘greatness’. I have a rather liberal view on steroids, but if you compete in an organization who explicitly outlaws it, not to mention your country, it becomes moot as to whether it’s right or not. The laws are as they are and until they are changed, doping is cheating.

  • #14810

    runnerdude
    Member
    Schpeff wrote:
    It will be interesting to see how the whole thing plays out. The whole “tattle tale” thing seems like something out of the McCarthy trials of the 1950s…..now people who doped may want to rat out their counterparts to save themselves.

    or, they may make up stories about their counterparts if they see that hearsay evidence and speculative information is enough to get people banned/disqualified. If the USADA stoops to such a level, then the sport will go downhill.

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