vision while running

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This topic contains 12 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  shark 13 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #2185

    shark
    Member

    A strange question, but I have recently had an attack of vertigo. Can people advise if when they run and their foot hits the pavement (with resultant vibration through the body ) there is a brief bounce or shake to their vision ahead. I suddenly seem very aware of what I suspect is normal. would be interested in other thoughts. Thanks

  • #17518

    Ed 1
    Member

    Pay close attention to how hard your feet are striking the ground. Remember that you need a smooth running motion – that includes the foot strike, roll through and push-off. Don’t throw your feet down or just let them fall to the ground – place them there in clear thought of landing the heel and rolling through to the ball of your foot for a push-off with your toes.

  • #17519

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    I don’t know. This sounds strange. It may be worth avisit to your doctor just to double check on your health.

    Ed 1 wrote:
    Don’t throw your feet down or just let them fall to the ground – place them there in clear thought of landing the heel and rolling through to the ball of your foot for a push-off with your toes.

    I couldn’t disagree more with “…clear thought of landing the heel and rolling through to the ball of your foot…”. You should not force a heel strike. In fact, it would be wise for people to, within reason, try to avoid a heel strike. This goes back to the shoes discussion. Heel striking is usually a result of wearing overbuilt shoes.

  • #17520

    Anonymous

    There seems to be a lot of debate on foot strike. I think a more natural foot strike is ball-heel-ball then toe-off. Watch children run barefooted, and they all run like this whether they are flatfooted or high arched. The goal of the modern shoe is to make everyone run with the same foot strike which was predetermined by some hocus-pocus person to be the right foot strike. Very annoying. It’s best to just let it come as naturally as possible with all that rubber and foam between you and the road, IMHO. 😉

  • #17521

    stealthycat
    Member

    ….but Guest was me. 😳

  • #17522

    r-at-work
    Member

    gee… the first time I read the initial post I some how got that you were talking about catching your toe and having you vision bounce… and I thought, “no, I fall so fast I never notice anything bouncing”…

    seriously, I like the idea of getting it checked out… I will say that one of my friends had a vertigo problem (not a runner) that ended up being an inner ear infection from untreated sinus problems… I’d almost worry more about the vertigo than the vision ‘bounce’…

    landing ‘lighter’ on you feet always helps, I worry about people who POUND the pavement, hurts me just to hear them… I tell my kids that they should be ‘sneaking’, remember when the rubber soled shoes were called “sneakers”… of course they ‘sneak’ on the balls of their feet… but that is another thread…

    -Rita

  • #17523

    stealthycat
    Member

    😆

    Yes, I completely got off topic with my post. I agree that it could be an inner ear infection. My sister once had one and it caused all sorts of problems with her balance and depth perception. Might want to get that checked out. 🙂

  • #17524

    Ed 1
    Member

    If you don’t land on the heel then you are either running flatfooted or off of your toes – that sounds unnatural to me. Bio-mechanically speaking the bend of your knee and ankle while in the mode of moving the leg forward automatically puts your heel towards the ground first.

    How many ruuners on this site don’t let their heels touch the ground? Or have them hit after their toes?

  • #17525

    r-at-work
    Member

    sounds like we need to take a poll for foot strike… who knows how to do that?

    but (still off topic) Ed1… last year my coach told me to take off my shoes (at home) and jog across the carpet, taking note of HOW I put my foot down… I’m not saying I always run that way, Ryan (and others) are right about shoes changing the way we run… on the other hand, I wouldn’t do a road race barefoot or even with flats, I need more cushion & support… but I admire those who can do it…

    -Rita

  • #17526

    JCWrs
    Member

    For me and some other people I have talked to it depends on how hard I’m running. If I’m doing easy miles I am a heel-striker, but the faster I run, the more and more I land on the ball of my foot. I think this is true for most in the running world. Go watch an elite distance race of 5K or 10K and tell me how many heel-strikers you see…

  • #17527

    Zeke
    Member

    Everytime you land with your heel first you’re putting on the brakes. I’m more of a mid-foot striker.

  • #17528

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    Ed 1 wrote:
    If you don’t land on the heel then you are either running flatfooted or off of your toes – that sounds unnatural to me.

    It sounds unnatural to most people who rely on overbuilt modern shoes. As was already mentioned, though, watch young kids who haven’t been wearing shoes enough to change their natural form.

    Ed 1 wrote:
    Bio-mechanically speaking the bend of your knee and ankle while in the mode of moving the leg forward automatically puts your heel towards the ground first.

    Actually, biomechanically speaking, the bend of your ankle naturally is used as a shock absorption mechanism.

    Ed 1 wrote:
    How many ruuners on this site don’t let their heels touch the ground? Or have them hit after their toes?

    This is a completely different discussion than who heel strikes. I have never suggested that you don’t let your heels touch the ground. My suggestion is ball-heel-ball. In fact, in overbuilt running shoes, which I still wear myself, my heel may still come in contact with the ground first when running slow but my foot plant is still toward the front of my foot, then I roll back to the heel before rolling back forward. The ball-heel motion is your body’s natural shock absorption mechanism. The heel-ball motion is obviously your body’s forward propulsion mechanism.

  • #17529

    Ed 1
    Member

    Maybe I should pay closer attention to where exactly my foot hits the ground. But anyway, back to the original topic – Shark, have you still been experiencing those odd vision issues? Or what have you done about them?

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