weight

Welcome! Forums Running Forum weight

This topic contains 12 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  cesar 10 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #7152

    cesar
    Participant

    hey everyone,

    i am 19, i started running at 14, i have kept my weight the same 144-150 pounds, if i keep running , it is possible to keep this weight for 20-30 years more? if so, how?

  • #24737

    GTF
    Member

    Why does it matter?

  • #24738

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    I've been roughly the same weight since my high school years. In fact, I was in my high 140s for my senior year HS T&F season and 13 years later, I actually still tend to top out in the high 140s and even drop down into the high 130s or low 140s when in peak condition.

    Is it possible? Depending on several factors, yes. Is it advisable/desirable? Depends on the individual.

  • #24739

    r-at-work
    Member

    Is it possible? Depending on several factors, yes. Is it advisable/desirable? Depends on the individual.

    and it's all relative… that is, look at your relatives… they may give you a clue if you carry similar genetics…
    -Rita

  • #24740

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    One thing I would say about looking at your relatives is that you also have to consider their lifestyles. I have relatives who are quite a bit larger than me but they also don't live the same lifestyle. The minority of my relatives who do live similar lifestyles look quite a bit different from the majority of my relatives who don't.

  • #24741

    r-at-work
    Member

    One thing I would say about looking at your relatives is that you also have to consider their lifestyles. I have relatives who are quite a bit larger than me but they also don't live the same lifestyle. The minority of my relatives who do live similar lifestyles look quite a bit different from the majority of my relatives who don't.

    exactly!! you can use your relatives with different lifestyles (and similar genetics) to see what might happen if you slack off in your training and take up the 'fast food' habits of many people… I have a set of seriously LARGE people in my family who enjoy eating and never exercise, keeps my motivation up there everytime I see them… as you age and you metabolism slows you have to be a bit more vigilant, well I do at any rate..

  • #24742

    SBSpartan
    Member

    If you keep the same lifestyle I don't see why not.  I have been abotu 130-135 for as long as I can remember.  In college I tried to gain a bit of weight but I just couldn't do it.

    The real question is…

    At age 19 you have a lot better things to spend time thinking about!

  • #24743

    ed
    Participant

    Way back in 1990 when I joined the Army at 20 I weighed about 120 pounds – after OSUT (Basic and AIT combined) I weighed in at 145 with very little body fat.

    Well fast forward 17 years  ::) and I am now at 158 – however my running has never been consistent – once stretch was 6 months and one was 4 months.  Other than that it has been 2 months here and there.  Add on top of that medication that is prone to cause weight gain and I ballooned up to 170 pounds. 

    As you age beyond the age of 30 it will take more work and attention to your diet to maintain your weight.  I just heard on the news that a study found that the average person's metabolism slows by 5% each decade after 30 years of age. 

  • #24744

    Run
    Member

    the average person's metabolism slows by 5% each decade after 30 years of age. 

    The question then becomes how much does running speed up your metabolism?

    I'm just glad when I read about such studies that I'm not an average person 😉

  • #24745

    GTF
    Member

    At age 19 you have a lot better things to spend time thinking about!

    As implied above, I agree — cross that bridge when you come to it.

  • #24746

    ed
    Participant

    Hey Tim – we all know that you are not even close to average 😉

    From the articles that I have read – running only boosts metabolism on the short term.  Both during your run and for a while afterward.

    The permanent increase comes from adding lean muscle mass – which can partially be achieved by running.  The running will give you a “lean” factor but you will need strength training to build the muscle.

  • #24747

    Run
    Member

    I think that just about all the people who post on this site fall well beyond the “average” category.  The average person in this country is fairly sedentary, is at least a little over-weight, and probably doesn't eat too well on a daily basis.  When reading stuff like that it's important to look around to see what has become the norm.

  • #24748

    Corrado33
    Member

    I have an old coach that has run everyday for some 11,000 days now, and he's still thin as a twig.  I'm sure he doesn't do any strength training or anything, but he still looks very good ad he has to be in his 50s or 60s by now.  It's funny, whenever I stop running, I lose weight, and whenever I start running, I gain about 5 or 6 pounds.  I'm sure it's all muscle mass but still, I always found that interesting.

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