What are poeple thinking…

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This topic contains 14 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 14 years ago.

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  • #1538

    Anonymous

    …the first 2 minutes of a 5k?

    Let me explain.

    I ran Sarah’s Stride 5k saturday. I ran 16:34, 11th place…splits were 5:23, 5:21, 5:17…I was pleased but I still have a way to go to get where I want to be in September, but for the training I have been doing,I was pleased, especially with the negative splits. I felt great, like I was attacking the whole time. I honestly think I could have run another mile at that same pace.

    Anyway, thats not my point. My question is, why do people feel it necessary to run the first 600-800m of a 5k like its Pamplona?

    At where I estimated was the 800m mark, I was behind at least 40 people, maybe more. About 15 seconds later, you could almost SEE over half of them go into Oxygen Debt. They looked like they were running in sand, and I just rolled right by.

    Are they hoping for some magical leap of fitness and to hold that pace for the whole race and get a 2 minute PR? I can safely assume that MOST of these people are pretty experienced runners, so its not like they are first timers making rookie mistakes. There was prize money for the top 5…..so maybe they WERE hoping for that miracle.

    Maybe I am missing something, maybe its FUN to make the 3.1 miles as painful as possible and get into O2 debt the first 2 minutes, maybe struggling is fun for them, maybe the enjoy going from 5 minute pace to 7:30’s over the course of 3 miles. It just doesnt look like its fun, and it can only lead to frustration and an AWFUL experience.

    I know sometimes its a pride thing. 16:34 is about 90 seconds slower than my PR, but there was NO WAY I was getting after that Saturday…..I’m just not into self abuse.

    I will say that I do run pretty smart and even paced, so that does throw in some bias, but If you saw what I saw Saturday, you would agree with me.

    I know people make mistakes, but when will they learn.

  • #14764

    ferris
    Member

    btw…that was my post, I forgot to login

    -ferris

  • #14765

    ferris
    Member

    ok….I know I spelled PEOPLE wrong….so lay off that!!

    -ferris

  • #14766

    Scattershot
    Member

    I have a similar problem. I have to repeat several times, “Stay within yourself, stay within yourself, stay within yourself…” whenever I’m running with or against other people. The temptation as a fairly inexperienced runner to sprint off the line is abundant, but I have a good idea, certainly within the first mile or so of any race, if I jumped the gun or not. I think there’s a certain group mentality that occurs. You see one person fly by and start to think, “Wow, if they keep that up I’ll never catch them”, so you turn on the burners. Someone behind you sees you do the same thing and does likewise, and so on. I think it takes a disciplined, focused runner to stick to their gameplan and not get drawn into these little games, especially in the shorter races.

  • #14767

    Peter
    Member

    Do you get your nickname b/c your last name sounds like “Bueller”?

    I agree that it seems ridiculous that that many people went out that fast. It makes more sense in a CC or trail race, where positioning is important, but not in a road race. I can also understand if it was a downhill 1st mile, since 20 or so years ago I ran the 1st mile at Al’s run in something like 4:48!! (Finished around 27:30). I, like most people, run best when I do even or negative splits. I’m really good at it in workouts, but not always so in races. Adrenelin does sometimes get the best of people.

    Congrats again on a very nice race!

    -Peter

  • #14768

    ferris
    Member
    Peter wrote:
    Do you get your nickname b/c your last name sounds like “Bueller”?

    thats about 1/2 of it.

  • #14769

    Anonymous

    😈

  • #14770

    Anonymous

    Most people lack the confidence to hold back.

  • #14771

    r-at-work
    Member

    I think it’s just enthusiasm and lack of planning… I’m okay for the shorter races but my first half and the first bunch of marathons I REALLY had to tell my self to start slowly…

    the last 10K I did (5-9-04) a friend who runs and my son both agreed that I should take it out at a pace better than I usually do… just to see if I could… would have worked if it had been a five miler… and really wasn’t too terrible, except for the hill at about 5.5…

    but even then LOTS of people shot ahead of me at the start and I passed them between the first and second mile markers, which surprised me since I almost never pass anyone…

    -Rita

  • #14772

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Somewhere along the line, I picked up the term “start line champions” for these people. These are the people who believe they will look like hot stuff because they were leading the race for a few seconds, even though they ended up finishing in the middle of the pack. Some actually believe they will look like hot stuff to start line spectators and in start line photos because they were leading. Really, all they look like are idiots because it’s easy for even a novice to pick them out.

    When I run a race where I expect to finish in the top 10, I will almost inevitably be around 50th at the quarter mile. At that point, I can pick out around 90% of the 40 people, give or take, who I will be passing before the finish. At the half mile, even as I’m settling into pace, I have already passed at least half of them. By the mile mark, I’m at worst up to 15th to 20th place and ready to race the people who are actually capable of thinking of a top 10 spot. The worst part of this whole situation is that it stretches out the amount of time you have to deal with traffic and delays the point at which you can actually find your real competition and focus on racing.

  • #14773

    Schpeff
    Member
    Ryan wrote:
    Somewhere along the line, I picked up the term “start line champions” for these people.

    Same here, only my teammates and I coined the term “flunkies.” These are the kids who during cross-country races sprint the first 100 meters across a big field and then die. I mean, I can understand pre-race adrenaline and such, but doing that is just plain stupid! The race is 5k, not 100 meters.

    Ryan wrote:
    The worst part of this whole situation is that it stretches out the amount of time you have to deal with traffic and delays the point at which you can actually find your real competition and focus on racing.

    That is also very true….although I was not in the lead pack during cross-country races, fighting with the second or third group and hunting down jerseys of certain colors was delayed until you passed the flunkies. Sometimes you’d hit the mile mark and say “uh oh I gotta get moving!” Usually all the flunkies have been passed by that point though, and you can get into your rythm and race.

    As someone who is not at the front of the pack, but back in the second/third group (say top 30 in a race of 300 kids)…..that’s my two cents. I can’t imagine how the leaders must feel while passing flunkies. 😉

  • #14774

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    Schpeff wrote:
    That is also very true….although I was not in the lead pack during cross-country races, fighting with the second or third group and hunting down jerseys of certain colors was delayed until you passed the flunkies. Sometimes you’d hit the mile mark and say “uh oh I gotta get moving!” Usually all the flunkies have been passed by that point though, and you can get into your rythm and race.

    This reminds me of the conference meet my senior season of collegiate cross-country. Our conference was loaded as usual, I believe 5 or 6 of the teams were ranked in the top 25 of the national polls and 3 or 4 finished in the top 10 at nationals. I was definitely a midpack runner. With 12 runners per team, I was hoping to finish in the top half of just over 100 runners. At the half mile, I was around 100th. At the mile, I was probably around 90th. I finished right around 50th, just making it into the top half of the race.

    Now, I understand that you sometimes have to get out good in cross-country in order to avoid getting boxed in. However, this seems a bit extreme. The course was wide open almost the whole was and passing was not a problem at all. I passed around 40 guys in the middle 3 miles of the race and only two passed me in the final 4.5 miles, one being a teammate who I caught up to at 1.5 miles and ran with until 4 miles before he left me and the other being someone who outkicked me after I passed him earlier.

  • #14775

    Ed 1
    Member

    I have made this mistake due to inexperience in my first 10K race after having run a 5K and a half marathon. I think that part of the problem was that the half marathon the week before provided pace areas to group people and the MadCity 10K did not. I had no idea where to begin so I paid the price for that by thinking that I was keeping a good pace but was over 30 seconds per mile faster than I was training at – boy did I get passed at the end 😳

  • #14776

    ferris
    Member

    This reminds me of the conference meet my senior season of collegiate cross-country. Our conference was loaded as usual, I believe 5 or 6 of the teams were ranked in the top 25 of the national polls and 3 or 4 finished in the top 10 at nationals.

    …and which team won that day?!

    sorry man…couldnt resist!! 🙂

    btw……count me in on the Al’s Run team!! Can’t wait, should be fun.

  • #14777

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    ferris wrote:
    btw……count me in on the Al’s Run team!! Can’t wait, should be fun.

    Excellent! It should be a blast! I just got something from Al’s Run earlier this week, some invite to a team captains kick-off. Of course, they do it right during the work day so I won’t be able to make it.

    BTW: Those punks from UWL won. Sorry man, couldn’t resist. 😈

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