What kind of running shoes do you have?

Welcome! Forums Running Forum What kind of running shoes do you have?

This topic contains 24 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  rockinrocker 10 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #10236

    rockinrocker
    Member

    I have New Balances, they are a bit old tho. Thinking of buying a new pair. Any recommendations? I mix my routines with running and walking at a moderate pace thru hills.

  • #25999

    BirdDog
    Member

    Currently in circulation:

    Asics Nimbus 10
    Mizuno Wave Precision 9
    Asics Strikes
    Adidas Response Cushion 17

  • #26000

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    I've been wearing racing flats for over a year now with great success. I currently have two pairs of Adidas adiZero MANA in the rotation, though one pair is looking very rough and doesn't have too many miles left in it.

    What kind of New Balance shoes do you have now and how are they treating you? I'm not sure I can make recommendations but others may have a better chance if they know what works or doesn't work (and what about it doesn't work) for you.

  • #26001

    ed
    Participant

    Even though they are relatively heavy I like the Air Pegasus –

    Mainly due to good cushioning and extra toebox room.

  • #26002

    r-at-work
    Member

    currently I have two pairs of Asics 2130s in rotation, with super feet insoles (taking care of plantar fascia issues)… but in the past I've also run in Addidas, Saucony & New Balance… sad to say some of my favorite shoes changed form as the years went on (why do they mess with success?)… keep in mind we all have different bio-mechanics, different training plans and different histories… best idea is to go to a “real” running store and talk to a salesperson who has the knowledge of the shoe market & enough experience with gait analysis to check out your running… then try on several suggested shoes and pick the one that fits your needs…

    I also gave up on “stylish” shoes for work and now wear good supportive shoes (most women would call them ugly).. made a huge difference…
    -Rita

  • #26003

    Run
    Member

    Currently in rotation:

    Adidas Supernova Cushion
    Adidas Supernova Comps (for longer races)
    Adidas Supernova Control
    Adidas Osweego
    Adidas Adizero RC (for shorter races)

    Obviously I'm and Adidas fan, they fit my feet really well, but lately it's been harder for me to find the good deals on Adidas shoes, so I'm thinking about looking at a pair of Asics.  I know they fit me well too, and for whatever reason, there are always good cheaps Asics around.

  • #26004

    rhq
    Member

    Currently in rotation:

    Adidas Supernova Cushion
    Adidas Supernova Comps (for longer races)

    Obviously I'm and Adidas fan, they fit my feet really well, but lately it's been harder for me to find the good deals on Adidas shoes, so I'm thinking about looking at a pair of Asics.  I know they fit me well too, and for whatever reason, there are always good cheaps Asics around.

    I also have the Supernova Cushion and Adistar Cushion in rotation with another brand (Asics Nimbus, Saucony Triumph). The Adidas fit me the best and they seem to last longer than the other brands. I was able to get 850 miles out of the Supernova 6 against 500 for the Saucony. But I am only 140 lbs at 5 ft 10.
    I have to second Run's experience that you never find deals on them.

  • #26005

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Probably not the wisest business decision to mention this since they aren't an advertiser but check out Holabird. The discounts may not be huge but, at least at the models I've looked at, Adidas tends to run about 20% off MSRP. Even more for closeout models/styles.

  • #26006

    msubobcats
    Member

    An older pair of Asics 2110 that is close to being retired. A nice pair of shoes.
    Two pair of NB 846's and a pair of NB 903's. The NB are comfy and I would buy them again. 😀

  • #26007

    Run
    Member

    I was able to get 850 miles out of the Supernova 6 against 500 for the Saucony. But I am only 140 lbs at 5 ft 10.

    I agree here too, I have gotten upwards of 800 miles on all of my Adidas, so maybe they are worth the extra$$. (I'm about the same size as rhq.)  But the deals I used to find, just a few years ago, were really deep discounts.

    Thanks for the idea Ryan, some of those prices are getting pretty close to my level.

  • #26008

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Honestly, completely unintentional here but I just received an e-mail that Holabird is starting an affiliate program (a very exciting announcement for me as I'm a Holabird fan). Check out the Hillrunner.com homepage if you'd like a link.

  • #26009

    Alan
    Member

    I usually run in Asics (DS) but lately have been running more trail in Salomon shoes.  I got a comp pair of BAR shoes for Badwater and they were awesome.  Thankfully comp though – $320 for a pair, but talk about a wide toe box – 135 miles of foot bliss. 

  • #26010

    XCkyle93
    Member

    Ryan, any suggestions for shoes?  Lately the shoes I've been getting from the specialty running store seem to be motion control shoes/ shoes for heavier runners.  I am a skinny ass kid, and these shoes are starting to feel heavy.  I even told them my last pair felt too heavy, so they gave me a supposedly lighter shoe; it still was too heavy.  I tried it in the store and i liked it, but after running for a week they still are slowing me down.  I honestly think I could run around 6:40 a mile easily for most of my long runs if it wasn't for my goddamn shoes.  Right now I have the Asics Gel Kayano 14; another motion control shoe it seems…still heavy.  I don't know how efficient my stride and footing and such is, but I'm pretty sure I don't severely overpronate or underpronate.  I don't know if I should take the shoes back or not, I certainly can't buy a new pair; they cost around $100 and I do not have a job so my parents have to pay.  I really am looking forward to the xc season and it's a shame that my regular training shoes always seem to suck.  My spikes are holding up quite well, but my coach seldom does workouts…like maybe once a week, so I really don't use them too often.

  • #26011

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    I'm by no means a shoe expert. I know what works for me but, beyond that, don't take the time to keep up much on shoes. Maybe someone who pays more attention to what is on the market could pipe in. To assist them, though, I'd suggest taking a look at an old pair of running shoes and noting where the wear pattern is, especially through the middle and front of the shoe.

    I would suggest asking them why they think you need motion control shoes. For the record, motion control shoes are not just for heavy runners. It's based on how your foot moves when on the ground, not how much you weigh. This is why I'm suggesting taking a look at your wear pattern to get some better advice.

    As for the weight of the shoes, I'm a fan of lightweight shoes but not everyone is and, again, I'm not going to claim to be an expert. Some people say training in heavy shoes and racing in light shoes is like lifting weights but in a way that is much more specific to running. You build strength, then throw on the light shoes and are much more powerful.

  • #26012

    rockinrocker
    Member

    Thanks for the suggestions everyone. I have a question, those shoes with the springs…how good are those to run in? Does it really help put that hop in your heel to run better? Here's an example:

    nike_training_shoe.jpg

  • #26013

    Run
    Member

    looks very HEAVY to me 8)

  • #26014

    XCkyle93
    Member

    I'm by no means a shoe expert. I know what works for me but, beyond that, don't take the time to keep up much on shoes. Maybe someone who pays more attention to what is on the market could pipe in. To assist them, though, I'd suggest taking a look at an old pair of running shoes and noting where the wear pattern is, especially through the middle and front of the shoe.

    I would suggest asking them why they think you need motion control shoes. For the record, motion control shoes are not just for heavy runners. It's based on how your foot moves when on the ground, not how much you weigh. This is why I'm suggesting taking a look at your wear pattern to get some better advice.

    As for the weight of the shoes, I'm a fan of lightweight shoes but not everyone is and, again, I'm not going to claim to be an expert. Some people say training in heavy shoes and racing in light shoes is like lifting weights but in a way that is much more specific to running. You build strength, then throw on the light shoes and are much more powerful.

    Quite true, I forgot that running in heavy shoes would kind of be an advantage because then when you get to lighter shoes, you're a crap load powerful.  It's just sometimes my heavier shoes make runs harder than I think they should be; like I usually like to maintain 7:20-7:40 pace, and at times when I'm wearing my heavier shoes it takes quite a toll on me, even on easy runs.
    I just had a workout today, nothing too much, but faster than last week's workout.  Took out the first lap in 1:23, pretty much stayed there; got slightly faster.  Came through the mile mark in 5:31 (on the track) and ended up running 5 3/4 laps in 8 minuts.  Could have easily went for 6, but I figured if I went any faster it wouldn't really be a tempo run anymore, it'd be more speed.  like 8 second ahead of the guy behind me, and the next guy was 10 seconds behind him.  Then we did a tempo around the hilly part of our course.  This has pretty much proved that I have improved over the summer.  During track I had problems running that pace for a 1200, and if I could which was almost never) it'd kill me.  I never ran faster than a 2:30 800 in practice; I ran around 2:35 and needed a full recovery, yet I still was able to run under 2:30 in  nearly every meet, broke 5 minutes in the mile at the end ( which I have stated a lot).  I usually always did better in races than workouts;  so if the same is true for this season, then wow, looks like this season is going to be good.  Though I just got a few plantar warts on my feet which really sucks… but luckily the place they're in is where I apply the least pressure on my foot.

  • #26015

    GTF
    Member

    Thanks for the suggestions everyone. I have a question, those shoes with the springs…how good are those to run in? Does it really help put that hop in your heel to run better? Here's an example:

    nike_training_shoe.jpg

    Those are not springs, they are nothing more than polyurethane foam columns.

  • #26016

    GTF
    Member

    Ryan, any suggestions for shoes?  Lately the shoes I've been getting from the specialty running store seem to be motion control shoes/ shoes for heavier runners.  I am a skinny ass kid, and these shoes are starting to feel heavy.  I even told them my last pair felt too heavy, so they gave me a supposedly lighter shoe; it still was too heavy.  I tried it in the store and i liked it, but after running for a week they still are slowing me down.  I honestly think I could run around 6:40 a mile easily for most of my long runs if it wasn't for my goddamn shoes.  Right now I have the Asics Gel Kayano 14; another motion control shoe it seems…still heavy.  I don't know how efficient my stride and footing and such is, but I'm pretty sure I don't severely overpronate or underpronate.  I don't know if I should take the shoes back or not, I certainly can't buy a new pair; they cost around $100 and I do not have a job so my parents have to pay.  I really am looking forward to the xc season and it's a shame that my regular training shoes always seem to suck.  My spikes are holding up quite well, but my coach seldom does workouts…like maybe once a week, so I really don't use them too often.

    Being skinny/light is not necessarily an exemption from sloppy biomechanics.  What store did you go to and what other shoes did they have you try out?  How much have you run in them so far?  If you are really unhappy with the shoes and believe that they are more shoe than you really need and you got them from a reputable local running store then they should take them back and at least give you some store credit to get shoes that you might be happier in.  If you are otherwise fine with the Kayano and like the Asics fit/feel/ride then take a look at the DS Trainer.  It is an Asics shoe with a medial post but is much lighter and is priced lower (and a better all-around running shoe, IMHO) than the Kayano.  Another good option could be the GT2K series shoes.  I used to run in the Kayano years and years ago (including the very first model) and once I finally got fed up with running in overpriced bricks I switched to the GT2K series and the DS Trainers with good results. 

  • #26017

    XCkyle93
    Member

    Ryan, any suggestions for shoes?  Lately the shoes I've been getting from the specialty running store seem to be motion control shoes/ shoes for heavier runners.  I am a skinny ass kid, and these shoes are starting to feel heavy.  I even told them my last pair felt too heavy, so they gave me a supposedly lighter shoe; it still was too heavy.  I tried it in the store and i liked it, but after running for a week they still are slowing me down.  I honestly think I could run around 6:40 a mile easily for most of my long runs if it wasn't for my goddamn shoes.  Right now I have the Asics Gel Kayano 14; another motion control shoe it seems…still heavy.  I don't know how efficient my stride and footing and such is, but I'm pretty sure I don't severely overpronate or underpronate.  I don't know if I should take the shoes back or not, I certainly can't buy a new pair; they cost around $100 and I do not have a job so my parents have to pay.  I really am looking forward to the xc season and it's a shame that my regular training shoes always seem to suck.  My spikes are holding up quite well, but my coach seldom does workouts…like maybe once a week, so I really don't use them too often.

    Being skinny/light is not necessarily an exemption from sloppy biomechanics.  What store did you go to and what other shoes did they have you try out?  How much have you run in them so far?  If you are really unhappy with the shoes and believe that they are more shoe than you really need and you got them from a reputable local running store then they should take them back and at least give you some store credit to get shoes that you might be happier in.  If you are otherwise fine with the Kayano and like the Asics fit/feel/ride then take a look at the DS Trainer.  It is an Asics shoe with a medial post but is much lighter and is priced lower (and a better all-around running shoe, IMHO) than the Kayano.  Another good option could be the GT2K series shoes.  I used to run in the Kayano years and years ago (including the very first model) and once I finally got fed up with running in overpriced bricks I switched to the GT2K series and the DS Trainers with good results. 

    If you mean biomechanics in the sense of over pronation or under pronation, I really don't think I do either…I did the wet sand test and checked the wear marks on my shoe etc. and they seem pretty neutral.  I try to emphasize my form at times to; kind of hard without really a proper coach for the majority of the year.  Well I do have a cross country coach, but he really has never made a comment about it so either he's a dud or I'm fine.  And I hear ya' on the overpriced bricks as well…that's what I think of the shoes right now.  $100 plus  for a brick on my foot.  I will try to see if they have either the GT2k/DS trainers and see how I like them.

  • #26018

    GTF
    Member

    It is better to get a foot analysis by a trained professional while running in the shoe.  Any decent running store offers the service.

  • #26019

    sueruns
    Member

    my attitude is much like Ryan's go with the most minimal shoe if you have no idea of your biomechanics and go from there.  I've sinced ponied up a few bucks to see a PT that specializes in biomechanics and found that my years of navigating shoes myself was pretty good.  My endless hours of trying to find the perfect shoe was fruitless, there isn't one for a forefoot underpronator, 90% of shoes are for heel strikers or overpronators, the other 9.9% are racers.

  • #26020

    SBSpartan
    Member

    The Mizuno R&D department spent some time in Atlanta a while back.  I was lucky enough to get some time with them.  They suggested a totally different shoe than I was running in.  At the time I was a Kayano guy. I liked the stable feel even though everyone said I didn't need it.

    Because Mizuno also told me I didn't need the stability I decided to try something else. And because Mizuno spent time with me I figured I would try their stuff.

    Been with Wave Riders ever since.  My only complaint is I don't get a lot of miles out of them.  Maybe 275-300.

  • #26021

    rlana
    Member

    Uhmmm.. Personally I like ADIDAS RUNNING SHOES. They seem to fit my feet well. But always keep this on your mind that each person is going to have unique needs so what is good for one runner, may not be good for another runner. Once you find a pair of shoes you can buy them on the net, or I may also suggest that you must go to a reputable running store to have them check your gait and have them suggest the pair of shoes that will be optimal for you.  ;D

  • #26022

    Mark
    Member

    Asics for me.

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