when to retire running shoes

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  sweet runner 13 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #4305

    jtpaten
    Member

    I’ve put just shy of 400 miles on my current running shoes. They’re feeling a little thin, but I may be imagining that because I’m between marathons and automatically thinking it’s time to switch, whether I really need to or not.

    I thought the rule of thumb was a pair of running shoes should last 500 miles.

    I’ve got a new pair of the same shoes waiting in the basement. I expect to be wearing the new ones for the July 30 trail marathon, but how far ahead should I be breaking them in?

    Should I put them on now, mid-week, so I’m accostomed to them before my longest run over the weekend? And is it completely unadvisable to go back and forth between the new and the old pairs for awhile if only to get more life out of both pairs?

    And whatever happened to Shoe Goo? My frugal father probably ran too long in too few pairs of shoes by relying on that stuff.

  • #18874

    Ryan
    Keymaster
    jtpaten wrote:
    I thought the rule of thumb was a pair of running shoes should last 500 miles.

    That’s an often stated rule of thumb but remember that the term “rule of thumb” implies that it is no hard and fast rule. Some people can’t get to 500 miles before their shoes are history, I personally couldn’t afford to buy a pair of shoes every 500 miles so it’s a good thing I can usually get around 600-800 miles on a pair of shoes.

    jtpaten wrote:
    I’ve got a new pair of the same shoes waiting in the basement. I expect to be wearing the new ones for the July 30 trail marathon, but how far ahead should I be breaking them in?

    Different people will tell you different things. I personally would like to have around 50-100 miles on them.

    jtpaten wrote:
    Should I put them on now, mid-week, so I’m accostomed to them before my longest run over the weekend?

    Again, different people will tell you different things. Again, personally, I seem to have a habit of “breaking in” shoes with a long run. Remember that modern running shoes don’t really need the “break in” period that the shoes of 20-30 years ago needed.

    jtpaten wrote:
    And is it completely unadvisable to go back and forth between the new and the old pairs for awhile if only to get more life out of both pairs?

    I would say it is completely advisable to do so.

  • #18875

    ksrunner
    Participant

    This is a topic that I occassionally wonder about as I feel I get a lot of mileage out of my shoes.

    I started running again about 5 years ago. During part of that time, finances were tight and I started putting a lot of miles on my shoes. Also, during this time, I have never purchased the same brand or model twice. Now, I still tend to put a lot of mileage on my shoes simply because I learned that I can. Of my last 6 pair of shoes, I have comfortably put 700 – 1000 miles on all of them — averaging about 900 miles. I say comfortably because there were two pair I extended their use beyond what was comfortable. I cut my mileage to compensate for the shoes and at one point, I ran in my racing flats for a week or two until new shoes fit in the budget. My last pair of shoes, some Reebok Premier Lites, I put 1002 miles on and retired them for bad odor as much as anything else. I think I will shop for Premier Lites next time around.

    I like to get a new pair of shoes before my current pair is totally worn out so that I can continue to use the old pair occassionally. It is especially useful if my main pair of shoes gets really wet and need some time to dry. After I get a new pair of shoes, the old pair is pretty much retired from long runs, so much of the last 100-200 miles is made up of shorter runs. That probably extends the mileage a bit. Another thing that might contribute to the longevity of my shoes is that I run a lot of miles on dirt/gravel roads.

    During this time, I have had only one significant injury and I cannot say that it was caused by shoes. That injury was a bout with plantar fascitis. After recovering, I put an additional 300-400 miles on the same pair of shoes that I’d been running in when I was injured.

    With all of that said, I still wouldn’t recommend that someone go out and try to put 1000 miles on each pair of shoes. I believe that another part of being able to use my shoes so thoroughly lies in that I was able to recognize when my shoes started causing me problems and either get new shoes or reduce my running until I could get new shoes.

  • #18876

    Adimal
    Member

    I would say run ’em until you think it’s time to change. They say once you start seeing breakdown on the outer part of the shoe, the inner workings are breaking down too.

    While shoes do get pricey, especially if you’re running 3 marathons a year, why not eliminate one factor in the overtraining/injury/equipment dilemma. 😈

  • #18877

    Double
    Member

    800 – 1000 miles

  • #18878

    MarkRunner
    Member

    I run in light weight trainers (NB833) and get between 300-400 miles. When I start to see the midsole under the balls of feet, it is time for new shoes.

    Mark

  • #18879

    On the subject of shoes, I picked up a new pair of Asics Cumulus 7’s and love them. They are a little lighter, cushier and more durable than the older versions of the Cumulus I’ve warn. I’m up to 500 miles which is good for me. Give them a shot if you like Asics.

  • #18880

    Personally I am not very heavy [110 lbs.] so I tend to get a lot of miles out of my shoes. Between 800-1000. For me it’s feel. My shins are sensitive so I can feel when the shoe starts to break down to a point of being bad for me. So I say go by feel. I currently use AVIA shoes and find their cantilever plate system is very durable and comfortable. Actually the most comfortable I’ve ever tried. I highly recommend them. Check out their site for their running shoes.

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