ksrunner

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 243 total)
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  • in reply to: Personal and Team HillRunner.com race report: 2019 Al’s Run #64602
    ksrunner
    Participant

    Ryan, Thanks for sharing your race reports and challenges. Great effort at Al’s Run.

    Sadly, though I read them at a perfect time, I did not learn from it and I went and made my own bad decisions which have set me back. I’ve been struggling with Achilles issues. While I’ve been waiting to get back up to speed, I decided I would start by walking. The approach that I took was to decide how much time I would like to spend running and walk for that amount of time. Gradually, I would incorporate running into my walks — increasing the run/walk ratio until I am running the full time. I started with just 3-4 30s runs over the course of 60-90 minutes of walking and progressed to approximately 90s run / 90s walk. I’ve gotten excited about the progression and my goal of running a sub-5 mile in 2020. But, on Monday (I read your posts on Sunday.), I tried 2 min running with 90s walk and over did it. In hindsight, I recognize that my body was telling me that I should back off from the 90s run/90s walk ratio, but I wanted to progress. I ended up aborting my plan and just walking home the last two miles. I’ve taken a couple of days off and tomorrow I will start again with 100% walking. It is frustrating, but I need to remember that I can only do what my body will currently allow and that I should back off at the first hint of distress to avoid future setbacks.

    Good luck with your remaining races this year.

    Steve

    in reply to: Is Eliud Kipchoge the Yoda of running? #64025
    ksrunner
    Participant

    I agree that he seems very wise like Yoda. He is definitely a Jedi master of running.

    I watched the short video about him that they made ahead of the London Marathon. In it he speculated that eventually, marathons might have teams similar to cycling some day and indicated that he could not do what he does without his training group. He spends 6 days a week in the training camp living a simple, running-focused life and one day a week with his wife and family.

    He’s so easy to like. I was happy to learn that he has won his fourth London Marathon this morning. I wish him continued success through 2020 and as long as he continues competing.

    in reply to: Race report: 2019 South Shore Half Marathon #63881
    ksrunner
    Participant

    Nice report, Ryan.

    Some of your report sounded eerily similar to a half marathon that I ran several years ago, but you finished stronger than I did at the time. I enjoyed both reading about your experience and remembering my own. Mine wasn’t my fastest half marathon, but it was one of my best race efforts.

    Aaron, nice job fighting to the end. It’s often hard to fight back after losing contact. Flu is no joke. I was totally down for three days this past week.

    ksrunner
    Participant

    Actually, even if Florida lacks hills, I will likely get fitter and maintain fitness better simply because I will have fewer farm/property maintenance responsibilities and more time for other pursuits. Time is definitely the limiting factor right now and will probably remain so until after the move. If there is an open stadium near where I move that would allow me to run bleachers, I might try that.

    Interesting fact: The difference between the lowest elevation (sea level) and the highest elevation (345 feet, Britton Hill on the panhandle) in Florida is less than the difference between lowest and highest elevation in Washington D.C. In Kansas, where I live now, the difference is 1,682 feet and Kansas is considered a flat — mostly by people who’ve never been here or who have only been in southwestern Kansas. Most of Kansas is rolling hills. Also, much of Kansas has very few trees. There is an ultra race that warns that some people have a phobia that makes them uncomfortable under such a wide expanse of open sky. I actually find it beautiful when driving on I-70 and I top a rise where I can see for miles including the large shadows from clouds passing between the sun. Though I live in a hillier/more treed area near Kansas City, I rarely go downtown and I feel claustrophobic when driving between tall buildings or in the mountains where I cannot see even a sliver of sky between the car roof and the enclosing walls of buildings or mountains. If I had to drive downtown often or if I lived in the mountains, I would probably own a car with a sun roof. Outside of the car, I am fine and I actually enjoy mountains (not so much downtown).

    ksrunner
    Participant

    Interesting race report. I can imagine that it would be brutal. I remember a time when I was in pretty good shape, running to and from work each day, and racing well when I raced. I was at work, late for a meeting and I hustled up 2-3 flights of stairs. I remember feeling much more winded than I might have been if I had sprinted the same amount of time. I can only imagine how it might have been pushing at race effort up many flights of stairs.

    The timing of your post is also somewhat interesting for me. My family and I will be moving to Florida this year. I’m concerned about the lack of hills. Though I haven’t always been good at running up hills, I have always felt that I needed hills in my workouts in order to be a decent runner. Perhaps stair climbing would be a good alternative. I did do a few stair workouts at work during a period when an injury bothered me while running, but not while going up and down stairs.

    Good job, Ryan.

    Steve

    in reply to: WHY AM I ALWAYS HUNGRY!? #54164
    ksrunner
    Participant

    My first thought is to have more fat in your diet. I find that fat helps to satisfy hunger longer.

    I’ve never had problems running on an empty stomach whether I was eating a carb-centric diet or a higher fat, lower carb, Paleo-like diet like I’ve been eating for the past 6 years. When we ate the carb-centric diet, I ate three sizable meals each day and snacked nearly constantly. Now that we get more fat in our diet, I’m eating twice a day (11 AM and 5 PM) and rarely snack between meals. Though fat has been vilified for a long time, we never went out of our way to avoid fat. Even when our diet was centered around breads, pastas, and baked goods, we used real butter, truly whole milk from our own dairy goats, cheese, avocados, olive oil. We did not buy low fat or reduced fat anything. If a food naturally had fat, we ate it that way.

    Anyway, good luck with finding a solution. I just wanted to offer something for consideration whether you use it or not. Diet can be such as sticky subject.

    Good luck,

    Steve

    in reply to: Track & Field shoots itself in the foot again #53268
    ksrunner
    Participant

    I’ve given some more thought with regards to age-graded races. I’ve ended by realizing that it really doesn’t matter how a race allocates awards whether it be gun time, chip time, age grading, raffle, costume judging, or some other method. I have been disgruntled in the past when the raffle prizes were better than the winner’s prize or when a prize that I thought I had earned went to someone else via age-grading, but now I see it as a problem with my perspective rather than a fault on the part of race organizers.

    Right or wrong, USATF also awards masters awards based upon age grading at some of its races. Given that is the governing body of our sport I can accept that as the standard.It is not a perfect solution, but it does provide some incentive for older runners to keep training to run fast.

    For the races that I remember most, I don’t recall what, if anything that I may have won. The things that I remember are how I ran, the runners who I competed with on that day, the tactical decisions that I made, and satisfaction of having given my best effort. Some of those races I won. Some I did not. In one case, I was injured, but came within 150m of winning a tight race after having finally created some space between myself and the competition. Prior to catastrophic hamstring failure, I had been experiencing feelings and situations that I had not enjoyed since college or maybe even since high school. Even the injured hamstring couldn’t completely dampen my euphoria on that day.

    So, I have come to the conclusion that I should not concern myself with awards when scheduling races. I’ll just look for races of the desired distance with good competition and let the awards fall where they will. I am sure that that is a healthier attitude that reflects what I think is important in racing.

    in reply to: Track & Field shoots itself in the foot again #53263
    ksrunner
    Participant

    It has been awhile since you responded, but I think that I agree with you. When I typed my response, I was thinking primarily of qualifying rounds. Really, asking that athletes stay on the track and within their lanes (if applicable) is a minimal requirement. Most sports have some sort of “field of play” that athletes need to stay within. The penalty in track and field may be harsh, but it is not unreasonable.

    Still, a race where the end results are decided by anything other than the sequence in which people cross the finish line will always feel unsatisfactory unless the DQ’d runner clearly impeded another runner or gained an clear competitive advantage.

    Do they use age grading to allocate masters awards in your area? I find age grading to be similarly dissatisfying when it alters the results from the finishing sequence. Fortunately at the race I ran this weekend the guy who won the masters award also was the first over-40 runner across the line, but that’s not always the case.

    in reply to: Track & Field shoots itself in the foot again #53247
    ksrunner
    Participant

    Though I would have liked to have seen Donavan Brazier and Paul Chelimo racing in the finals, I don’t feel that I can really complain about those DQs. They and several others broke the rules and the officials enforced those rules. Per Colleen Quigley’s comments, it may have been more challenging to stay on the track with the steeply banked curves, so, I think that athletes should have had access to the track prior ot race day to familiarize themselves with track conditions. As for Farah, perhaps he should have been DQd. It does suck though when outcomes are decided by officiating.

    Perhaps instead of a DQ, they could assess a penalty in the results. The simplest method would be to asses a fraction of a second penalty and then adjust their finish time and place by that amount and disallow that performance for any record consideration. They could also assess a distance penalty (maybe 1m? how much advantage could really be gained with 1 step?) and apply it using finish line photos. A distance penalty would scale better across different running velocities.

    I also thought that athletes could maybe have one free step inside during each race, but then I imagined everyone taking a step inside as they come out of the final turn and that seems ridiculous.

    in reply to: Should men and women run the same distance? #53220
    ksrunner
    Participant

    I would say that the answer is yes, men and women should run the same distance. After reading some of the comments from elite women, I am not certain that in every case women should adopt the men’s distance. It’s cross country. I am not even certain that the distance needs to be standard. Why not let geography rather than round numbers dictate the course length. If a great course measures 7.6K, run that. If the meet is hosted somewhere else next year and the course measures 9.2K, great! So long as all of the competitors run the same course and the same distance, it can be a great race. Perhaps just have a distance range as a guideline and let meet organizers set up a great course.

    in reply to: 2017 running recap, 2018 goals #53149
    ksrunner
    Participant

    Update: After the first of the year, the running store updated their site to open up registration for the Irish Mile on St. Patrick’s day. I’ve signed up and now I just need to continue training and stay healthy until race day.

    in reply to: 2017 running recap, 2018 goals #53111
    ksrunner
    Participant

    2017

    The first 2/3 of 2017 started about how most of the last three years have gone. I was coming off some fairly consistent, but low-mileage trainiing at the end of 2016, but in January, I started having some plantar fascia issues and then injured it fairly severely when I got caught far from home on a cold, miserable day. (Note to self: It’s okay to back track 1/4 mile and wait in the warm convenience store for a ride home.)

    So, I ended up taking 1-2 months completely off and then resuming training very gradually. It was more gradual than absolutely necessary because though I needed a day off between runs initially, I often to 2-3 days off betwen runs. Gradually though, it got to where my PF did not bother me after every run and I could start increasing the mileage and running on consecutive days. But, I still remained inconsistent until I started getting motivated and committed in September. At that time, I dusted off the spreadsheets that I used for logging in the past and added some features to allow tracking goals. I set two goals for each of the remaining months of the year. The primary goal was simply a “days run”. I set my goal to run 20 days in September. The secondary goal was a mileage goal. In the end, I did not hit even one of those goals, due to a weird knee injury that the chiropractor was able to fix, a couple of farm-focused weeks while I was on vacation from work, and a couple of weeks due to illness. Nevertheless, I consider the goal setting to have been a success since this has been the best block of training that I have had in years. I will handle the goals a bit differently in 2018 though.

    One of the workouts that I started enjoying at the end of 2016 was a hybrid workout where I would run an interval workout (short or long intervals or a ladder going short to long to short), jog about a mile, and then run 1 mile hard. I would log the time for the mile so that I could see the progression over time. I had gotten that time down under 6 minutes consistently at the end of 2016 and had run a 5:43 in January.

    Highights since September:

    • 100 miles in November
    • 5:49 mile yesterday (I skipped the intervals and ran it like a time trial. I wanted back under 6 before 2018.)
    • long run of 12 miles

    2018

    Now that I’m starting to feel fit again, I have started thinking about racing. Last year, before I was injured, I had seen a St. Patrick’s Day road mile advertised and I was immediately interested. Quite awhile ago I had thought that it would be cool to run a sub-5 mile after I turned 50. I will only be 49 in 2018, but it would be nice to see where I’m at and then have another year to train to try again at 50. The only problem is I do not yet know if the race will become and annual event or not. I have not seen it advertised. I’m giving them another week or two before I contact the organizers to ask about it. If that race is no longer offered, I will need to find another opportunity to race a mile. Unfortunately, my company no longer participates in an Olympic-style corporate challenge event which includes a 1-mile race on the track. I used to look forward to that every year. Until I know about the state of the mile race, I do not have specific race plans for spring. I will likely run a 5K that a friend coordinates in late March or April. It is small and I have run it (and won it) twice though I have never been happy with my performance. They changed the course last year to use a new section to the trail system that the race supports. The old course was somewhat slow. The surface on the new course is likely the same, but I wonder if the new route might be less hilly. On the old course, I never ran under 19, but I probably wouldn’t be happy unless I ran under 18. I’ve never been very good at soloing a fast time. Beyond that, I have no plans for spring. I might see if there is some way to get into the Corporate Challenge races (1 mile, 5K, and half marathon) as an individual. I think that they may have a team made up of individuals who chip in to pay the entry fees. I would likely skip the half unless my long runs are going especially well.

    For the fall season, I would like to run my hometown road race at the end of August for the first time since high school. It is a hilly five mile race. I would like to be under-30 which would definitely have me in contention most years. There is also a Labor Day 5K that is a fast 5K that will likely be the week after the hometown race. That is likely the best opportunity for hitting a 5K goal because it is a fast course that usually includes several fast runners. There would likely be stiff competition in the over-40 crowd as well. I would like to run under 17 there. I may also consider a fall half marathon. For that my goal would be low 1:20s. If I don’t feel that I could run low 1:20’s, I would probably skip it. If I’m not doing a half marathon, I will likely find 1-3 other fall races to run.

    Training wise, I would like to continue to progress. For 2018, I will continue setting training goals, but unlike in 2017, I will not increase the goal for the next month unless I met (or very nearly met) the goal for the previous month. Then maybe I will be able to meet my goals more regularly. For my hard workouts, I will gradually increase the duration of my interval sessions. Once I get up to around 20 minutes of hard effort in longer intervals, I may shift to doing tempos every other week. I also plan to keep doing a session of shorter/faster intervals with longer rests at least once every other week. I will likely continue finishing some of my workouts with 1 mile hard as it is fun to have something measurable to track. Currently my long run is at 10-12 miles. If I find that there will be a 1-mile road race on St. Patrick’s Day, I will probably maintain it at that level through February and then start increasing my long run again after that race. Otherwise, I will progress and mostly train through any spring races with just a slight cut back the week before a race.

    in reply to: 2017 running recap, 2018 goals #53108
    ksrunner
    Participant

    Nice job, Cesar. Keep running.

    in reply to: KCCC 5K #32784
    ksrunner
    Participant

    Thanks for the running feedback and the garden/livestock interest.

    With regards to the latter, I am willing to post about it, but I in this partnership with my wife, I am more of the laborer than the brain, but I am learning. She has shared much of her knowledge at our website.

    Right now, we are reading Joel Salatin's books and trying to figure out how his lessons can apply to us in our smaller context. He's running a business, but we're mainly wanting to feed ourselves and through cutting costs and perhaps a bit of selling to allow my wife to quit her work away from the farm.

    In the short term, we are moving our goats to different pastures more frequently. Ideally, we would do this with electric fencing, but we did not have funds available for purchasing anything, so we are making do by repurposing cattle panels that had been in use elsewhere. Joel likes to move his animals everyday, but in our case, we actually want our goats to destroy some of the shrubs and things that they like to eat to make room for more grass. So we might let them stay in the same area longer. We also have many fewer goats than he has cows.

    Now that the goats are settling in again, our focus is shifting to the gardens. This weekend we planted broccoli, cauliflower, strawberries, and some flowers. I also scavenged some lumber from an old barn on our property (It was too far gone to salvage when we moved in.) to build some small raised beds. The first was a hexagon bed 1' on a side for an ornamental herb. The second is a 2'x2' bed that will be the top tier of a tiered strawberry bed. The bottom tier was already built it was part of my daughter's flower garden last year and this year is being reallocated for strawberries.

    I'm also working on digging up the post for an old satellite dish. It is in space that we intend to use for gardening. I've dug down about a foot below the concrete all the way around and cannot move the post at all. I would have thought that I should at least be able to create a little wiggle. I'm beginning to despair about how deep or heavy this thing might be.

    In the future, I will post garden/sustainability related stuff in the non-running forum or a blog entry (should those be running related too?), but I thought I could get away with some non-running here since it is in response to previous posts and also related to why I'm reducing my racing schedule this year.  🙂

    in reply to: Help! Running Gear suggestion – Running Buddy? #32777
    ksrunner
    Participant

    That looks interesting, but it does not appear that it would hold enough to suit me. I run to and/or from work and I often pack breakfast, snack items, or some item that I may have forgotten to bring with me when my wife dropped me off with my week's worth of supplies on Monday.

    My pack is an Eddie Bauer pack that I bought quite some time ago. It has three pockets. A main pocket that is fairly large. A smaller outside pocket that I always leave empty now because the zipper is broken. It also has a flat pocket with an outsize zipper. That flat compartment sits right against my back and if I don't have enough stuff to fill the large compartment, I will put it in that flat compartment and it will be held snug against my body with minimal or not bouncing. When I am only using this pocket there is very little bouncing. The empty part of the pack probably bounces a little, but since it is carrying no weight, it is not noticeable.

    Nevertheless, I do wear the fanny pack snugly to prevent bouncing. The heavier I pack it, the more snugly I have to wear it. When I am only using the flat pocket, it does not have to be quite so snug because there is little weight and all of the weight is held close to my body.

    From appearances, the running buddy might work. If it were just ID and keys, I would think that it would work fine, but I think that an iPhone will make it heavier and more prone to bouncing (and perhaps dragging your shorts down). 😮 You might need very good elastic on your shorts or to tie the drawstring fairly tightly which would defeat the purpose.

    I have run with three different fanny packs and with a lightweight, framed backpack. From my experience, I find that I always need to have my pack secured snugly to my body. The lighter the weight and the closer it rests to my body the less snugly I need to secure it to prevent bouncing. Also, if you're using a belt or fanny pack, a wider belt makes the snug fit more comfortable.

    If you could find some compression shorts with a pocket in the middle of the back that is large enough to accommodate your iPhone, that would probably be the least bouncy option available. I have some compression shorts with such a pocket that I wear for long runs when I am on call for work. It carries the cell phone with absolutely no bounce, but my particular pair of compression shorts would probably not accommodate an iPhone. The smaller, non-smart phone that I carry for work is a tight fit.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 243 total)