ksrunner

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Viewing 15 posts - 226 through 240 (of 243 total)
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  • in reply to: and yet another injury #18969
    ksrunner
    Participant

    Rita,

    You might consider rolfing for your back.

    I’ve never experienced rolfing. My wife has a back injury. (A horse fell on her 20 years ago.) Two years ago she discovered rolfing after someone recommended rolfing to treat another condition. The rolfer learned of her back injury and asked permission to work on that also. The day after that appointment was the first time that my wife had been pain-free since the accident occured. So, she definitely recommends rolfing.

    I am not certain what would be the best method of finding a good rolfer in your area. Our rolfer was recommended by an acquaintance who is a mid-wife. So, you might talk to someone in an alternative medicine field to get a recommendation.

    Steve

    in reply to: July 2005 #18979
    ksrunner
    Participant

    I put in 297 miles in 24 days this month. That’s a new high for me. I started of slowly — missing three days over Fourth of July weekend. After that, I put in 6 days each week. My longest week was 81 miles including my first 20-miler of the season. That was also a new high for a week. It was somewhat remarkable because I only did doubles three times that week rather than 5. It turns out that I may have overdone it a bit that week, because I finished the month in an overly tired state and took a couple of days easy. I plan to get back at it this week though.

    I also ran and won a local 5K over the weekend. My time was not especially fast, but I focused on winning rather than going after a fast time and I didn’t make a move until about a half mile from the finish. I would probably be happier with my race if I would have pushed the pace more.

    in reply to: Any weeklies… #18960
    ksrunner
    Participant

    I am still fairly new here, so I will share some background. I am training for Gobbler Grind Marathon on November 20. This was my third week of marathon focused training. I’ve increased mileage fairly aggressively to this point. I’m feeling good so far.

    My best run of the week was Sunday’s long run. My daughter awakened us at 4:30 and I took advantage and got out the door shortly after 5:00. It was much, much cooler. Sunday’s 20 miles felt easier than Friday’s 12.

    M: 8

    T: 10.5

    W: 4.5 AM / 8.5 PM

    T: 8 AM / 4.5 PM

    F: 12 AM / 4.5 PM

    S: Off

    S: 20.5 AM

    Total: 81

    in reply to: Running 6 miles to and from a 5K race #18957
    ksrunner
    Participant

    Thanks Ryan,

    I hadn’t considered doing the long run prior to the race. I will have to think about that. My wife would probably be willing to come pick me up after the race. I am not certain that I am ready for such a plan, but it is definitely worth consideration.

    I may not do it for this race, but there is another race in September that I could probably handle this way. The start time is a bit later, it will be cooler by then, and it would be a nice way to incorporate new scenery into my long run.

    in reply to: Running in the heat #18940
    ksrunner
    Participant

    Thanks for the reply’s on hydration. I think this morning’s run answered my question for me. I ran 12 miles and it was rather uncomfortable. So, I will definitely be taking something with me for any runs of 90 minutes or more — if only to see if it makes a difference. It may just be increased volume that is getting to me.

    Another thing that I’ve been doing that doesn’t seem to have any negative impact and may be helpful is that I’ve been drinking a smoothie before many of my runs. My wife and daughter usually have a smoothie every day and they freeze one for me. When I get home from work, I put it in the refrigerator to thaw and by morning, it is the perfect consistency. They’re very easy to digest. On Sundays, I usually have one after my run as well.

    in reply to: Running in the heat #18932
    ksrunner
    Participant
    Ryan wrote:
    Yes, you sweat a lot running for an hour or more in that kind of heat but, if you go in well hydrated and drink plenty of water after, I am proof it won’t kill you.

    Is there a point at which one needs to start hydrating in the middle of a run?

    I do not seem to have any problems when I am out up to 2 hours (~16 miles), but as I increase my long runs to 3 hours or more, should I be hydrating during the run? If it helps to answer the question, lately when I’ve run anything over an hour, I’ve returned from my runs with both my shorts and my socks saturated with sweat. I look as if I’ve been swimming rather than running.

    Thanks,

    Steve

    in reply to: when to retire running shoes #18875
    ksrunner
    Participant

    This is a topic that I occassionally wonder about as I feel I get a lot of mileage out of my shoes.

    I started running again about 5 years ago. During part of that time, finances were tight and I started putting a lot of miles on my shoes. Also, during this time, I have never purchased the same brand or model twice. Now, I still tend to put a lot of mileage on my shoes simply because I learned that I can. Of my last 6 pair of shoes, I have comfortably put 700 – 1000 miles on all of them — averaging about 900 miles. I say comfortably because there were two pair I extended their use beyond what was comfortable. I cut my mileage to compensate for the shoes and at one point, I ran in my racing flats for a week or two until new shoes fit in the budget. My last pair of shoes, some Reebok Premier Lites, I put 1002 miles on and retired them for bad odor as much as anything else. I think I will shop for Premier Lites next time around.

    I like to get a new pair of shoes before my current pair is totally worn out so that I can continue to use the old pair occassionally. It is especially useful if my main pair of shoes gets really wet and need some time to dry. After I get a new pair of shoes, the old pair is pretty much retired from long runs, so much of the last 100-200 miles is made up of shorter runs. That probably extends the mileage a bit. Another thing that might contribute to the longevity of my shoes is that I run a lot of miles on dirt/gravel roads.

    During this time, I have had only one significant injury and I cannot say that it was caused by shoes. That injury was a bout with plantar fascitis. After recovering, I put an additional 300-400 miles on the same pair of shoes that I’d been running in when I was injured.

    With all of that said, I still wouldn’t recommend that someone go out and try to put 1000 miles on each pair of shoes. I believe that another part of being able to use my shoes so thoroughly lies in that I was able to recognize when my shoes started causing me problems and either get new shoes or reduce my running until I could get new shoes.

    in reply to: running with a headlamp ? #18758
    ksrunner
    Participant

    You might check with some ultrarunning forums. It would make sense that they would have experience with this since some ultra races last 24 hours or more on trails. There are some ultrarunners that post here too.

    Good luck

    in reply to: Random #18704
    ksrunner
    Participant
    Ryan wrote:
    Actually, don’t government guidelines take it a step further and make whole grains the cornerstone of their recommended diet? This is how it should be, as nutritionists have been trying to tell us for years.

    I thought so too, but I needed to get ready for work and did not take time to look it up.

    Ryan wrote:
    I want to give him a chance to make this work before giving an overall excellent park system a bad reputation because of this issue that I have been told is being addressed.

    I hope things get better with the dog situation. I tried carrying pepper spray once, but the wind made it impossible to deploy it effectively and the dog was smart enough to back off immediately if I made any non-running move. Now, I just avoid running past that particular house. That dog is not necessarily the most threatening. It is just the most annoying as it barked incessantly at my heels for 1/4 mile or more. It was also disconcerting to look down and see the flashing of teeth each time it opened its mouth.

    in reply to: Random #18700
    ksrunner
    Participant

    1. Eat healthy. Generally that should include carbs. Even the government recommended diet includes some emphasis on whole grain foods.

    2. The Nike Free is a bit intriguing. After reading about a local barefoot runner, I gained some interest in it, but my interest waned as I realized that trying to acclimate my feet to running barefoot would take a lot of time. Currently, I prefer to spend my time training to run fast. If I were given a pair, I would try them, but I wouldn’t buy them. If it becomes important to run barefoot, I will find a grassy park and take off my shoes.

    3. Drivers are also a problem for me. Drivers that do not slow down on dirt roads and kick up huge clouds of dust and drivers who do not dim their brights when I’m running at night with a reflective vest. I usually try to make it clear that I am blinded by holding my arm in front of my eyes. In town, I’ve noticed that often the drivers who have made me most nervous have also been talking on cell phones.

    Ryan, The amount of trouble you have with dog owners who refuse to take responsibility for their pets is just incredible.

    Ryan wrote:
    Leash law violators. I can’t go over 1-2 weeks in Minooka Park without a serious incident involving one of these idiots. … After that incident, I’m not going in the park again without pepper spray.

    It’s too bad that it’s the dogs rather than the owners who will get the pepper spray. I know that you’ve said that the police won’t come to enforce the laws. Perhaps the local news station could be interested in doing a story. It would be more interesting than many of the stories that they do on slow news days and it would raise awareness — which could also influence the police action.

    Steve

    in reply to: Base+ #18680
    ksrunner
    Participant

    Have you ever considered taking one of your six month training cycles and training to peak for a shorter race? You could even define a season at the end of the 6 months and run a series of races. One of the advantages of training for shorter races is that if you have an off day, you can try it again next week or the week after.

    Good luck with whatever you decide to do.

    in reply to: Cannot find time or energy to run #18674
    ksrunner
    Participant

    Ed,

    Congrats on the new job. Good luck with pursuing your goals.

    Steve

    in reply to: Cannot find time or energy to run #18672
    ksrunner
    Participant

    Ed,

    This might not be the right time to prepare for a marathon right now. I’ve run two marathons — both were learning experiences, but neither was what I’d hoped for. Prior to the first one, I had moved to a new home, sold one car, and basically turned life on it’s head. It took awhile to figure out where training fit into the new schedule. My training schedule gradually evolved to running to and from work every day.

    The next year, I tried again. I actually tried to plan around work and family life, but, I failed to adjust when a project was delayed such that I was suddenly working tons of hours beginning 1.5-2 months before the marathon. I ended up getting sick about 2 weeks out. Again, my marathon performance was less than stellar. I also got sick again shortly after my marathon as the heavy workload continued.

    Marathon training takes a lot of time. I would advise training as much as you can this year. Run shorter races and save your marathon training for when your life is more stable. It will probably make for a much better experience.

    Steve

    in reply to: Starting line strategy #18582
    ksrunner
    Participant

    Fortunately, despite the number of people, there is less jostling than in a competitive collegiate race. (I haven’t ran in many, but I wasn’t ready for the pushing in the conference 1000m my freshman year so long ago.) I think that the varying abilities and the fact that relatively few runners are truly racing makes it a more amicable event. Still, that is another reason to stay to the outside. I am certain that they’ve had falls. They’ve been doing this since the 80’s.

    I expect to be in the top 2 of the mile and the top 5 of the 800m based upon past performance. The 800m is the most competitive with some fast guys stepping up from the 400m. I should have a good idea of where I stand among the milers after the corporate challenge 5K this weekend.

    To give you an idea of the scope of this event, corporate challenge lasts about a month. It started last weekend with golf, trap shooting, and the fishing tournament. They also have various team sports, triathlon, cycling, duathlon, tennis, darts, pool, bowling, ping pong, and swimming. I am certain that I’ve missed some. Companies also have to provide volunteers for one event. They get points for volunteers and they are penalized if they do not provide enough volunteers.

    It is fun and there are no entry fees for participants since the companies pay the participation fees. Profits go to charity.

    in reply to: April Monthlies #18525
    ksrunner
    Participant

    249 Miles

    25 Days

    46 runs

    April was a good month for me. I had at least two higher quality workouts each week.

    I missed one long run on the third (hangover from a mediocre March), but other than that, I was consistent with my plan. This is probably my second best month ever mileage wise. I ran a pretty good race at the Trolley Run (4 miles, 21:13). On the calculator, that converts to a 16:14 5K time. It appears that I have a good chance of bettering my 5K PR on the 15th.

Viewing 15 posts - 226 through 240 (of 243 total)