Ryan

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  • in reply to: Race report: 2019 South Shore Half Marathon #63883
    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Thanks Steve. I could say the same as you. This was far from my fastest half marathon but it was probably my most well run, simply because I can’t think of much I could have done better. A little slower in miles 10 and 11? Maybe I could have been 10 seconds faster overall.

    in reply to: Race report: 2019 South Shore Half Marathon #63879
    Ryan
    Keymaster

    By the way, for anyone interested, official results are here.

    in reply to: Race report: 2019 South Shore Half Marathon #63878
    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Thanks Aaron. Yes, it was you. To be honest, I was surprised to see you fading. I’ve seen you at enough races to expect when I saw you ahead early that you would stay there. Sorry it didn’t go your way but you fought through well. I know I didn’t hold pace in the last 2 miles but I was expecting/hoping I could still get away from you. You really battled it out and kept me honest.

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Interesting topic. I’m sure you are much like me, with many years of experience resulting in quite the collection of various finisher’s medals and awards, whether age group, overall, or whatever.

    I’m apparently surrounded by people who like to display these things. I’d have most of my old trophies and medals packed up in a box in the basement if it weren’t for my mother always getting on me to display them and my wife backing her up. So I have a collection of various awards on top of the upper cabinets in the kitchen. As for the medals, they are mostly in the closet.

    I have a few awards that do mean something to me. Things like team awards that were either decided by coaches or my teammates. A few things like medals for qualifying for state or winning a conference championship. Things like these have a deeper meaning because they signify more than just another race. They were things people I greatly respect honored me with or they are reminders of major goals accomplished. As for most of the rest, I have trouble parting with them but they just fill the background.

    I do recall once having to throw out a trophy after it fell and broke. Sadly, it was one of the relatively few trophies that meant something to me because it was the one which I earned by winning my hometown road race.

    Beyond that, though, I’m with you. The ones that can serve a practical purpose make a lot more sense. I have a few mugs that can serve some purpose. I have a few ceramic coasters I can put out on end tables. I’ve received gift certificates that I’ve been able to put to good use. These are the things that, these days, I appreciate most. Something that serves a practical purpose and doesn’t just become another dust collector.

    I do like the idea of a traveling trophy or some kind of plaque or something similar commemorating past winners. In fact, the Madison Jingle Bell Run did something like this for teams. The traveling trophy was pretty large with an inscription of each winning team (think of a small time version of the Stanley Cup). I believe the Hank Aaron State Trail 5K does the same for the team trophy.

    As for what to do with them, sadly, I don’t know. For me, they just continue to collect dust on top of the cabinets.

    As for hanging around for the awards ceremony, there have definitely been times when I just wanted to hit the road but I always try to honor the event. I personally don’t feel right skipping out. If they put the effort in to hold the ceremony, the least I can do is hang around to be a part of it.

    Of course, I’m a little more selective in the races I now run and awards is one of the considerations. One of the things I like about the Walleye Run I’ve done the past several years is that they give out things like the coasters they have the past two years. When I did Hank Aaron, one of the draws was the gift certificates as awards. Then again, I just signed up this past weekend for a half marathon with finisher’s medals and age group awards that I believe are medals. But it was only $20 for a well organized low profile event so that was the draw.

    Anyway, I’ve rambled long enough. Interesting topic. Less clutter and more functional awards definitely is a draw for me at least.

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    I have no doubt you’ll make the most of the area you move to.

    I’ve heard of how flat Florida is and it’s no surprise when you fly in and see the landscape from the air. It is pretty crazy to think about, though. Yesterday, on a 12 mile run, I recorded 633 feet of elevation gain and I wasn’t even searching out hills. Getting that in some places would be a monumental task.

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Thanks Steve. It was definitely a different challenge than running. I was told runners tend to make good stair climbers but it definitely is not a direct crossover.

    Much like you, I’m not all that great on hills but I highly value them in training. I’m fortunate to live by plenty of hills but I can imagine your concern. My best guess is that working some stairs into your workouts would be a reasonable alternative. I’ve recommended stairs for people who don’t have good hill options for many years.

    in reply to: Thoughts on the new Boston Marathon qualifying times #54185
    Ryan
    Keymaster

    William, interesting thoughts. As I’ve stated in other places, I personally believe it’s the BAA’s race and they should do what they feel is best. I do think you’d get some pushback over your ideas (sometimes the best ideas get pushback so I’m not saying that’s a bad thing).

    1. “It’s for charity, that’s a good thing!” I totally get that argument and have to admit it was my first thought when I read your idea. Maybe Boston should be an exception? There are a lot of races that raise a lot of money for charity, maybe there should be one that doesn’t? I could go either way with that argument but it’s an interesting idea that I don’t think should be dismissed as quickly as certainly many people would want to dismiss it.

    2. “It’s tradition!” I know some people who go out to Boston every year. It’s part of the tradition for them to do so. I have a little trouble with this. If they qualify and they want to make a tradition of going out there, why shouldn’t they be able to keep that tradition going? That said, as with the charity idea you offer, just because I’m not a big fan of it doesn’t make it an idea that’s not worth considering.

    in reply to: WHY AM I ALWAYS HUNGRY!? #54011
    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Unfortunately, how the stomach reacts while running is a very individual thing. That means the best advice would be to experiment some. Try different foods and different amounts. Try also experimenting with your dinner. Eating a little more then might help hold you over in the morning without leaving you with a full stomach while running.

    Also, don’t forget that sometimes hunger is a sign of dehydration. Make sure you’re drinking some water before starting your runs.

    in reply to: Belated race report: 2018 Walleye Run double #53358
    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Thanks Chris. I do feel bad about falling short of 30 minutes but, obviously, I’m right there. I’m not letting it get me down. Just fuel for the fire to keep me going through the summer so I’m ready to break 30 in the fall with better fitness and hopefully better conditions.

    Besides, I still got my two top 10 finishes and only got beat once in my age group, by someone who was only racing once that morning. I’ll accept that as a good day. 🙂

    in reply to: Very belated race report: Gary's Gallop 5K #53330
    Ryan
    Keymaster

    So much for brief. Oh well…

    in reply to: Track & Field shoots itself in the foot again #53271
    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Interesting. Apparently you’re not the only one who came up with a time penalty idea.

    To be honest, I’m still not sold on that idea. In fact, the conclusion of that article, in my opinion, argues against the time penalty itself.

    Right now, track and field needs every fan it can get. It should bolster its image as a sport that’s beautiful because it is so simple: no esoteric rules or insider jargon. The first person across the line is the winner. At least that’s how it should be.

    Going back to my fear of time penalties the author seems to be promoting, implement them and the first person across the line may not be the winner.

    However, he does bring up a point I do think we should keep in mind:

    It was a contentious decision since, per IAAF Rule 163.4, an athlete should only be disqualified in such an instance if “material advantage is gained” from the infraction, which hardly seemed true in Chelimo’s the case.

    I hate rules that create a gray area of subjective judgement. However, if that’s what the rule currently is, then enforce it that way. Chelimo gained a material advantage? I don’t think so.

    in reply to: Track & Field shoots itself in the foot again #53264
    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Yeah, I could see some method for qualifying rounds making more sense than finals. Still, my personal feeling is that, even in qualifying rounds, first X across the line should qualify. Unless someone is automatically thrown into the time qualifiers field for a minor infraction that results into a time penalty.

    If nothing else, I’m finding this an interesting thought experiment.

    I understand the situation for officials. When do you DQ and when do you not? Where do you draw the line if there is some jostling, which is common on indoor tracks? Stepping out of your lane or inside the track seems like a no brainer but there is something about that Birmingham track. At the very least, athletes should be granted access to the track before competition starts so they can get a feel for it. Not all tracks are the same, especially indoors.

    I’ve never run a race where any awards are decided by age grading and I think I would avoid any that did if I knew before signing up. I’m not at all a fan of that idea. I don’t even like when chip timing changes the order of finish in the results.

    in reply to: Track & Field shoots itself in the foot again #53248
    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Honestly, I think the Chelimo DQ was legitimate. He stepped inside the rail, that should be a DQ. What bothers me is the inconsistency. Why was Farah’s step inside the rail in the Olympics not a DQ? Neither went inside the rail due to being pushed or cut off. Neither used going inside the rail to gain a better position or for any competitive advantage other than the minuscule distance saved. So why the different outcome?

    As for the men’s 400, I saw Seb Coe respond to someone that athletes should in the future be allowed to get on the track before the meet to preview it. Apparently, the banking was challenging and causing even highly experienced professional athletes to run out of their lanes. I saw an interesting chart on Twitter (I’ll see if I can find it and share) on DQs by year in the men’s 400 at World Indoors. The number is generally low, with two big spikes this year and the last time Indoor Worlds was on this track.

    As for the idea of a penalty in the results, I get where you’re coming from but I don’t like it. One of the great things about track and field is that it’s black and white. First across the line wins. Beat your opponent to the line. That’s all that matters. If we start assessing penalties, then you lose that.

    I’m not quite sure how IAAF rules are but, when I was in high school, the rules were clear. A single step completely inside the line is a DQ. Three consecutive steps on the line is a DQ.

    in reply to: Should men and women run the same distance? #53221
    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Now, there’s an interesting idea. Why bother with a set distance. I’m sure anyone who has run high school cross country can think of at least one course where you ran around a baseball outfield or a football field just to get to the standard distance. It’s cross country, why have standard distances?

    Give a set distance range, maybe 4K to 5K for high school and 8K to 10K for college and the pros. Then build a course that makes sense. As long as the runners know ahead of time what the distance is going to be, what’s the harm?

    I really like that, it’s a great idea.

    in reply to: Team HillRunner.com: 2018 races? #53206
    Ryan
    Keymaster

    I’m hearing of some interest in the Hank Aaron State Trail 5K. This is an event I’d love to field a team for.

    They don’t have team information available yet but, in the past, they had a minimum team size of 8. Can we get 8 people who would be interested in joining us for a 5K at Miller Park on August 11th?

    As for scoring, in the past it has been cumulative time of the top 3 runners. PRO tends to run away with it. Looking at last year’s teams, the competition was tougher than when I was on teams in the past but I would think we’d be in the running for a podium finish (third place team last year averaged 19:19).

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 4,865 total)